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Old 07-07-2012, 12:42 PM
 
1,072 posts, read 2,404,269 times
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I'd definitely be concerned and think pulling police reports for both address is a good idea. I would also try to find the neighborhood busy body, every neighborhood has one. She should be able to give you all the details the police can't about the former owner and this kid. Have you introduced yourself to the neighbors? It's amazing what people will tell you if you just ask as few simple questions.

This kid doesn't seem inherently dangerous. The gun thing is worrisome, but it isn't loaded, and you have no reason to believe he has access to bullets or a desire to use it. It's definitely a cause for concern, but if you really feel this is a great house for you and your family I would investigate further before backing out. Typically disabled adults are just looking for acceptance and to please. If you establish ground rules and are clear with this kid, I'm sure you could peacefully co-exist.
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Old 07-07-2012, 12:46 PM
 
Location: El Dorado Hills, CA
3,670 posts, read 7,974,554 times
Reputation: 3748
Ask your agent about cancelling the contract. Have all your contingencies been released? With bank-owned homes, it is usually a passive release (you don't have to sign a release, just the passing of the date releases it). Here in CA, during the inspection period you can cancel for almost any reason. "Upon further inspection, I don't want the house". Where you are located and the contract you signed will determine if you can cancel without penalty.

I wouldn't choose to live next door to someone I felt was a danger to me or my family. Your red flags are flying, listen to them. Trust your instincts on this.
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Old 07-07-2012, 01:07 PM
 
3,404 posts, read 4,138,299 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NinaN View Post
Ask your agent about cancelling the contract. Have all your contingencies been released? With bank-owned homes, it is usually a passive release (you don't have to sign a release, just the passing of the date releases it). Here in CA, during the inspection period you can cancel for almost any reason. "Upon further inspection, I don't want the house". Where you are located and the contract you signed will determine if you can cancel without penalty.

I wouldn't choose to live next door to someone I felt was a danger to me or my family. Your red flags are flying, listen to them. Trust your instincts on this.
This is good advice. Though I tend to think he likely isn't dangerous it sounds like you would be having to be deal with his behavior, because his parents don't and the fact that he thinks he can be there is really inconvenient. I have lived next door to inconsiderate neighbors before and at the very least it is a real pain. It's something to consider.
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Old 07-09-2012, 02:55 PM
 
1,349 posts, read 4,364,223 times
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I would try and understand the situation better before bailing. First off, although it sounds menicing on the internet, I really don't know how creepy this guy is.

It could be a terrible situation that you want to avoid or not. The other issue really is, you don't get to choose your neighbors, they could sell tomorrow to wonderful people, you could pick a different place and this guy could buy the house next to you there. putting too much emphsis on the neighbors can be a mistake, since they aren't part of the house.

but once you get a better idea about the kid, trust your instincts.
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Old 07-09-2012, 05:14 PM
 
3,777 posts, read 7,165,585 times
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Talking to the father and the neighbors and checking with the police are all good ideas, but I didn't see anything in your original post that indicates the young man is dangerous.

You're probably in more danger from some more "normal" neighbor that you'd never suspect. Or you might have a group of great 10-12-year-olds who, five years from now, bring drugs and crime to your neighborhood.
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Old 07-10-2012, 09:18 AM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,175 posts, read 14,253,018 times
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First thing I'd do is head to the neighbors' houses across the street and on the other side. Find out what the story is with this "kid".
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Old 07-10-2012, 04:51 PM
 
Location: under the beautiful Carolina blue
15,728 posts, read 23,957,202 times
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If this guy is truly just slow, and not mentally ill, you can probably deal with him. It's like a child. Just explain to him that he can't come over whenever he wants, etc etc.

However, the fact that he brings up the former owner and then screams that he can't talk about him tells me he is either mentally ill or possibly has some form of autism. Then you've got a problem, if you can't control him. You may think you love this house. My sister lived next door to a guy who was mentally ill...he lived with his parents. The whole town knew him. He went from being "crazy Tommy" as a young guy to "crazy Tommy". My sister said she didn't even realize till she moved how stressed out she was living next door to him. My sister sold her house to a cop, LOL.
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Old 07-11-2012, 05:54 AM
 
205 posts, read 566,234 times
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If I hadn't even moved in to a house yet but had already had several encounters with a neighbor - "slow" or not - including one that involved a gun - loaded or not - I wouldn't feel to great about my chances of a harmonious relationship with the neighbor. Is he going to tell creepy stories of suicide in front of your child? If the kid is harmless but tends to wander and chat with people, why didn't his parents pre-warn or come over afterward and explain that? The first rule of real estate is location, location, location. You may love the house and the price but that means nothing if its next to a neighbor that makes your life hell. You get what you pay for.
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Old 07-11-2012, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
22,533 posts, read 46,067,135 times
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Your offer will have a financing clause in it. I was a real estate agent at one time and I've never heard of a contract that didn't. So there you were, rushing around to get FHA approval, when that was your "out" all along. Maybe you were able to do something with the radon levels issue but it was so much simpler to say that you couldn't get funding. I wish I had seen this thread earlier. If you haven't done everything on the FHA's list, don't. They won't approve you and you are out and can get your money back. If you did, undo one then tell the FHA that your fix didn't take and it can't be remedied.

The agent didn't tell you this because she wants to get paid and to heck with you. It's one of the reasons I got out of the business. I wanted people to be happy in their new home. I would have found you a different house. Now you know the real reason the house was at a great price. There was a suicide and the neighbor is a nuisance at best.

And by the way, you CAN tell BOA that you are not comfortable with the radon levels, even if they attempt to remedy them. You can back out due to that. Tell them you think there is residual effects even if it is fixed. That stinking agent of your wants you to move forward, no matter what. For shame.

If BOA balks at handing back your earnest money - and they will, they are my mortgagor and enormous tools - tell them that even though it is a loophole, they didn't present the house in good faith. An absentee owner like a bank can say they had no knowledge of the death. However, the selling agent - please don't tell me your agent has a dual alliance! - must disclose if it occurred within the past three years. You have the power in this situation, but no one told you.

http://www.legalzoom.com/everyday-la...t-home-sellers

http://homebuying.about.com/od/homed...q2Disclose.htm
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Old 07-11-2012, 12:12 PM
 
1,784 posts, read 2,877,367 times
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Also, does your contract have a clause about receiving HOA rules and regulations? Usually you have X days from receipt to approve of them, so you can always just say you're not satisfied and bail at that point.
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