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Old 11-25-2018, 06:43 AM
 
7,803 posts, read 4,399,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar 77 View Post
I could not do that (rent it out), my home is my safe place, my peaceful place, my retreat from the noise and aggravation of the world. I need it to be neat and clean with everything in it's place, placed by me. I would feel creeped out if anyone lived in my home without me being there.

I do envy you, however, that you could do that. I wish I could.
I'm not that attached to any material possession and expect to be even less so in retirement/as I age. After all, we can't take it with us? Especially if my future home is a vacation-type property, I'll keep it pretty generic, storing any last, lingering personal effects in a "safe place" within the property or outside it.

"When he died, although it took me awhile, I realized I no longer had a reason to stay in Minnesota. So I moved to Arizona."

I, too, have been tied to where I'm living for decades due to personal obligations -- first as a family member, eventually a caregiver and then as an employee securing my pension. When it all comes to an end and I really have no reason to stay here, I often wonder if I'll be like a lifelong caged animal whose cage door has finally opened, but has no idea what to do with that unaccustomed freedom! I'm sure it must be an adjustment in thinking and feeling. Hope I make good use of it.
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Old 11-25-2018, 06:48 AM
 
7,803 posts, read 4,399,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
I've seen these vehicles on the road. In fact, I've got one parked next to me right now.


They're converted Dodge Grand Caravans. It's really clever how they pack so many features into a small space.


https://www.jucyusa.com/rvs-for-sale/


They'll buy it back from you if you try it and find you don't like it. No idea what the buyback percentage might be.
The camper van has many advantages for travelers. It's great for providing a place to overnight while on the road, but too compact for full-time living, IMO.
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Old 11-25-2018, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,981 posts, read 3,468,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
The camper van has many advantages for travelers. It's great for providing a place to overnight while on the road, but too compact for full-time living, IMO.
I agree. I have until September to make any decisions as I renewed my lease this past September. This allows me the opportunity to explore options.

Regardless I will be buying camping essentials as I do plan to explore this beautiful state. I get excited thinking about it as I haven't spent a lot of time outside of Minnesota. I'll probably invest in a good tent as I don't relish the thought of sleeping in the car. I've been researching different options and there are some that are remarkably easy to put up, yet strong enough to withstand the wind.

One woman who spends a lot of time traveling in her car mentioned that she bought most of her essentials at thrift stores. I'm going to check those out before I buy anything new. If need be I'll buy new.
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Old 11-25-2018, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,981 posts, read 3,468,620 times
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Another thing I think about is checking for someone who is upgrading to a larger space and wants to sell what they are using now. I assume I would do something like that if/when l was ready.

There's so much to think about, so many options to explore. I want to be careful and make the right decision. If I did this, I would probably have to borrow from my investment account to buy something decent. At first that thought scared me but I realized I could pay it back quickly with what I would normally pay for rent.
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Old 11-25-2018, 09:18 AM
 
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I'm just back from a road trip to visit relatives. It was 3 hours on the freeway each way. Sometimes it was ok, mild traffic. Coming into cities, it was much worse. In St. Louis, the freeways are nuts. It is maybe not as bad as LA, but it is up there. I mean 6 lanes and people driving like crazy. And I did it both early evening and late evening. At 9 PM it was still insane near St. Louis. Now we were in an SUV. Think about driving in that with an RV. That is not for me, no way. And then when you get to a campground setting up and all that. I salute those that want to try this lifestyle, but I'm not doing it.
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Old 11-25-2018, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,706 posts, read 4,738,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmp61616 View Post
I'm just back from a road trip to visit relatives. It was 3 hours on the freeway each way. Sometimes it was ok, mild traffic. Coming into cities, it was much worse. In St. Louis, the freeways are nuts. It is maybe not as bad as LA, but it is up there. I mean 6 lanes and people driving like crazy. And I did it both early evening and late evening. At 9 PM it was still insane near St. Louis. Now we were in an SUV. Think about driving in that with an RV. That is not for me, no way. And then when you get to a campground setting up and all that. I salute those that want to try this lifestyle, but I'm not doing it.
There are a few differences.

Typically RVers aren't in any kind of a hurry. Traffic awful? Pull off.and take a nap. Or fix a snack. Or use the bathroom. Or use your iPad to get an overall view of regional traffic and where it's snarled. Or watch a movie.

When you have an RV, you have options. I'm on my way to Arizona but currently I'm parked at a place called the Oasis, 40 miles west of Needles. I'm working at this stop because this is my busy season and the van is big enough for me to work in. I couldn't do that in a car.

Campground set up and take down is tough, it must take all of 20 minutes. Connect shore power to the van. I don't bother connecting fresh water because any I use from my tank I will just replenish before leaving camp. Don't really need a sewer connection; I just dump the tanks before leaving. And I'm good for another month or so.
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Old 11-25-2018, 11:45 AM
 
2,446 posts, read 2,076,017 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
There are a few differences.

Typically RVers aren't in any kind of a hurry. Traffic awful? Pull off.and take a nap. Or fix a snack. Or use the bathroom. Or use your iPad to get an overall view of regional traffic and where it's snarled. Or watch a movie.

When you have an RV, you have options. I'm on my way to Arizona but currently I'm parked at a place called the Oasis, 40 miles west of Needles. I'm working at this stop because this is my busy season and the van is big enough for me to work in. I couldn't do that in a car.

Campground set up and take down is tough, it must take all of 20 minutes. Connect shore power to the van. I don't bother connecting fresh water because any I use from my tank I will just replenish before leaving camp. Don't really need a sewer connection; I just dump the tanks before leaving. And I'm good for another month or so.
Wow you only empty your sewer tanks once a month or so?
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Old 11-25-2018, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Mexico City (at the moment)
1,345 posts, read 471,972 times
Reputation: 1963
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
Form the Washington Post:

"""The Meinhofers and a dozen others who spoke with The Washington Post about this modern nomadic lifestyle said living in 200 to 400 square feet has improved their marriages and made them happier, even if they’re earning less. There’s no official term for this lifestyle, but most refer to themselves as “full-time RVers,” “digital nomads” or “workampers.”"""


https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/other...%99/ar-BBPCBc5

My brother and his wife will be doing this next year when they retire, selling their home and hitting the road full-time in their RV.
My wife and I have discussed doing this. I went to Youtube looking for lifestyle tips, pros and cons, etc....

I quickly realized Youtube is full of hypocritical e-beggars that want you to fund their lifestyle, and there is all sorts of in fighting between the e-beggars themselves, so take that into consideration if you have an interest.

There are some videos with very practical advice though.

My wife and I will likely rent an RV and try it out first. No "B" class for us though, we would want a decent "C" class with shower, likely try the boondocking route first.
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Old 11-25-2018, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,981 posts, read 3,468,620 times
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Otterhere,

Although I had been researching different places for retirement prior to my son's demise, it took me awhile for it to sink in that I could move anywhere. Arizona wasn't even on my list and it was through reviewing and corresponding with other cd folks that I started looking at it.

I always thought I would settle down on the other side of the map; Tennessee, Missouri, maybe Florida. But, I came to visit and I stood open mouthed and in awe of the mountains and the sunsets. I always thought I would hate living in a desert climate. To my surprise, I fell in love with it.

You'll never know until you try what you will like. Start researching now and by the time you're ready to go somewhere you will have a basic knowledge of where you want to visit and see if you like an area. I know I totally surprised myself.

Now, after researching nomad living, I'm pleasantly surprised that there are so many people doing this in Arizona. A lot of people follow the weather, moving lower in the winter and higher in the summer but staying in Arizona. There appears to be a lot of free camping areas in this state.
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Old 11-25-2018, 02:20 PM
 
6,307 posts, read 4,752,208 times
Reputation: 12914
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
The camper van has many advantages for travelers. It's great for providing a place to overnight while on the road, but too compact for full-time living, IMO.
Maybe not for a couple, but I have seen a great many singles full timing in a camper van. The biggest downside is no shower. A sponge bath could substitute for a day or two and there are often other options: campgrounds, community centers, etc.
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