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Old 03-13-2011, 07:25 PM
 
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I know it's a Ford...but anyone know what the model is?

Wondering if it may be a good buy...
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What tractor is this?-tractor.jpg  
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Old 03-13-2011, 07:28 PM
 
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Looks like a Ford 601. Built in the 50s after the run of the 8N. I think the 601 was the replacement for the 8N if I remember right.

It would be a decent little acreage tractor. I think it lacks live PTO power but they are still a useful machine.
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Old 03-13-2011, 07:33 PM
 
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I have about 6 acres, but assuming this is a "Jubilee", doesn't it have only 32hp? If so, can't you get about the same hp (those little riding lawnmowers) at the local hardware store at the same price?
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Old 03-13-2011, 07:41 PM
 
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No, the Jubilee was built in 53 to celebrate 50 years of the Fordson tractor. It was a special labeled 8N. The next year the 601 came out.

It should have a 3 point hitch that allows for moderal attachments to be used, so a mower to mow the acreage. A bush hog to mow the rougher areas. A blade to grade the land and maintain the roads.

Now a hardware store lawn mower only does one thing with varying degeres of success and are not going to hold up like real tractor.
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Old 03-13-2011, 10:27 PM
 
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PTO might be turned on and off with a lever that might not be readily accessible when seated in the driver's seat. Hydraulics might be passive, meaning that the weight of the tool is what drops it down. Might not be a problem for mowing, but a definite minus for scraping or excavating.
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Old 03-13-2011, 10:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rrtechno View Post
PTO might be turned on and off with a lever that might not be readily accessible when seated in the driver's seat. Hydraulics might be passive, meaning that the weight of the tool is what drops it down. Might not be a problem for mowing, but a definite minus for scraping or excavating.
If I recall on the old Fords they are right down at the left hand side of transmission housing below the seat. The 3 point is on the right hand side at the seat. There is a draft sensing to control the implement position while working.
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Old 03-21-2011, 11:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasNick View Post
I know it's a Ford...but anyone know what the model is?

Wondering if it may be a good buy...
That's the Ford 9n or 2n. They were made from 1939 to 1947. It is not a model 8n.


Whether or not it's a good buy depends entirely on why you want to buy it. If you just want a cool old collector tractor, and the price is right, I'd buy it. If you want a "working model" you'll want to go a different direction. These tractors did not have live hydraulics or live pto. They were also a bit quirky mechanically (some did not have pressurized radiators).

Remember - some of these tractors are over 70-years old! They're simply not like modern tractors.
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Old 03-25-2011, 05:06 AM
 
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We had a Ford 900 from 1958 to 1999 and used it on our commercial farm. We kept it because it was a nice enough tractor. It had some limitations like a non-live PTO but an over-running clutch will take care of that for 30 bucks, though a lack of 4x4 is what really limited it for logging work. For 6 acres, and a perfectly geared 4 speed tranny, you will be just fine.

As for your comparison to your lawn tractor...you are comparing apples to oranges. One has to understand the concept of torque and horsepower to appreciate the difference. The old steam driven tractors of 1900 had only 12 HP yet could pull a 10 bottom plow. On our farm we now pull a 7 bottom plow with a 200 hp tractor. Why? Because the old tractors had a 2 ton flywheel that once was in rotation, had incredible torque that was hard to stop. It turned slow, but it was hard to stop. Your lawnmower derives it HP rating from moving light weight, really fast. Compare torque specs on the old Ford 600's with the torque specs on your lawnmower and you will see a wide gap between the two.
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