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Old 01-25-2013, 11:46 PM
 
1,682 posts, read 2,720,616 times
Reputation: 713

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A competition for a < 400 sq ft "micro apartment" was held in NYC and a winner recently selected.

New York City's Future Micro-Apartment Revealed! - Microdwellings - Curbed NY

Meet the Five Finalists in NYC's Micro-Apartment Competition - Runners-Up - Curbed NY

Architects Imagine Housing Alternatives for New York City - Beyond Microdwellings - Curbed NY

This Micro-Apartment Exhibit Is So Enticing, You'll Want to Move In - Housing - The Atlantic Cities

The winner in particular has 55 units (40% affordable/subsidized) with apartments that range from 250-375 sq ft and:

•Includes a gym
•Laundry room
•Nine to ten foot ceilings
•Juliette balconies
•Social/Entertainment spaces on most floors
•A deck
•Multi-purpose lounge for dinners and events
•Bike storage
•General storage area
•Rooftop garden/patio
•Ground floor retail (A cafe in this case)
•Multiple use primary room (Hybrid Living/Bedroom)
•Storage innovations in each unit

In an urban, very dense, prime location neighborhood. Built adjacent to SBS (BRT) bus service and nearby walking distance to a subway station, and tons of amenities like restaurants, museums, schools, nightlife, parks, ect.

Thoughts?
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Old 01-26-2013, 12:14 AM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,714,031 times
Reputation: 2538
Quote:
Originally Posted by nykiddo718718 View Post
A competition for a < 400 sq ft "micro apartment" was held in NYC and a winner recently selected.

New York City's Future Micro-Apartment Revealed! - Microdwellings - Curbed NY

Meet the Five Finalists in NYC's Micro-Apartment Competition - Runners-Up - Curbed NY

Architects Imagine Housing Alternatives for New York City - Beyond Microdwellings - Curbed NY

This Micro-Apartment Exhibit Is So Enticing, You'll Want to Move In - Housing - The Atlantic Cities

The winner in particular has 55 units (40% affordable/subsidized) with apartments that range from 250-375 sq ft and:

•Includes a gym
•Laundry room
•Nine to ten foot ceilings
•Juliette balconies
•Social/Entertainment spaces on most floors
•A deck
•Multi-purpose lounge for dinners and events
•Bike storage
•General storage area
•Rooftop garden/patio
•Ground floor retail (A cafe in this case)
•Multiple use primary room (Hybrid Living/Bedroom)
•Storage innovations in each unit

In an urban, very dense, prime location neighborhood. Built adjacent to SBS (BRT) bus service and nearby walking distance to a subway station, and tons of amenities like restaurants, museums, schools, nightlife, parks, ect.

Thoughts?
Great solution for those who want to live urban, are young and have few possessions, do not want a lot of space to maintain and ony require their abode be in the middle of the thick of things. I can't imagine why someone woukd object to these being built.
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Old 01-26-2013, 01:07 AM
 
Location: Southern California
15,087 posts, read 17,558,796 times
Reputation: 10299
Quote:
Originally Posted by nykiddo718718 View Post
A competition for a < 400 sq ft "micro apartment" was held in NYC and a winner recently selected.

New York City's Future Micro-Apartment Revealed! - Microdwellings - Curbed NY

Meet the Five Finalists in NYC's Micro-Apartment Competition - Runners-Up - Curbed NY

Architects Imagine Housing Alternatives for New York City - Beyond Microdwellings - Curbed NY

This Micro-Apartment Exhibit Is So Enticing, You'll Want to Move In - Housing - The Atlantic Cities

The winner in particular has 55 units (40% affordable/subsidized) with apartments that range from 250-375 sq ft and:

•Includes a gym
•Laundry room
•Nine to ten foot ceilings
•Juliette balconies
•Social/Entertainment spaces on most floors
•A deck
•Multi-purpose lounge for dinners and events
•Bike storage
•General storage area
•Rooftop garden/patio
•Ground floor retail (A cafe in this case)
•Multiple use primary room (Hybrid Living/Bedroom)
•Storage innovations in each unit

In an urban, very dense, prime location neighborhood. Built adjacent to SBS (BRT) bus service and nearby walking distance to a subway station, and tons of amenities like restaurants, museums, schools, nightlife, parks, ect.

Thoughts?
What is the rent per month and/or cost per square foot?

[the critical question]
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Old 01-26-2013, 01:32 AM
 
1,682 posts, read 2,720,616 times
Reputation: 713
Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKEETC View Post
What is the rent per month and/or cost per square foot?

[the critical question]
"Affordable" units range from $940 to $1800 per month with income caps. The other 60% are only listed as market rate. Keep in mind:

•Rent controlled apartments reduce the area median contract rent.
•High end luxury apartments increase the area median contract rent.
•In this community, zip code 10016, studios are hard to find.
•The average contract rent in Manhattan is now $3,418.
•Consider the available amenities you find inside the building.
•New construction.

http://www.city-data.com/zips/10016.html

Also consider:

Quote:
At the moment, New York City has 1.8 million one and two-person households, but only has one million studios and one-bedroom apartments. And according to the city’s projections, the population is expected to grow by 900,000 residents by 2030, and most of those residents won’t be part of traditional nuclear families.

Consider the following statistics determined by the American Community Survey in 2009:

•33 percent of New Yorkers live alone
•24 percent of NYC households share their home with an additional adult or family
•9 percent of New York City households are single parents with children under 25
•17 percent of NYC households are a couple living alone, with no children
•17 percent of NYC households are a nuclear family with children under 25
http://www.thirteen.org/metrofocus/2...housing-needs/
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Old 01-26-2013, 01:57 AM
 
Location: Southern California
15,087 posts, read 17,558,796 times
Reputation: 10299
Quote:
Originally Posted by nykiddo718718 View Post
"Affordable" units range from $940 to $1800 per month with income caps. The other 60% are only listed as market rate. Keep in mind:

•Rent controlled apartments reduce the area median contract rent.
•High end luxury apartments increase the area median contract rent.
•In this community, zip code 10016, studios are hard to find.
•The average contract rent in Manhattan is now $3,418.
•Consider the available amenities you find inside the building.
•New construction.

http://www.city-data.com/zips/10016.html

Also consider:



Who'd Live Here? Micro-apartments and NYC Housing Needs | MetroFocus | THIRTEEN
My monthly house payment is about $1200. I have 1945SF of space which matches or exceeds the attributes in red:
Quote:

•Includes a gym
•Laundry room
•Nine to ten foot ceilings
•Juliette balconies
Social/Entertainment spaces on most floors
•A deck
Multi-purpose lounge for dinners and events
Bike storage
General storage area
Rooftop garden/patio
•Ground floor retail (A cafe in this case)
Multiple use primary room (Hybrid Living/Bedroom)
Storage innovations in each unit
The other attributes are inconsequential.

[i probably doesn't help that I hate studio apartments]
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Old 01-26-2013, 02:22 AM
 
1,682 posts, read 2,720,616 times
Reputation: 713
Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKEETC View Post
My monthly house payment is about $1200. I have 1945SF of space which matches or exceeds the attributes in red:


The other attributes are inconsequential.

[i probably doesn't help that I hate studio apartments]
Your neighborhood doesn't compare in land value, so obviously it's much cheaper.

Your comparing apples and oranges. The type of people who would move into these micro-apartments are singles and couples not seeking a home in Southern California. They want a car free, walkable, diverse, dense, energetic urban neighborhood with an unlimited number of nearby cultural, nightlife, restaurants, museums, schools, ect. Most of those structural amenities I pointed out are normally only found in newer high end luxury condos here.
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Old 01-26-2013, 02:23 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,070,870 times
Reputation: 12635
Comparing the afforded by someone else rent levels on these micro-apartments to market rent is irrelevant. All that matters from a public policy standpoint is what the real cost of them is, which is generally quite expensive. As an example, the Maydestone Apartments was refabbed with $4.6 million in public money, half of which ($2.3 million) forgiveable loan and the other half a low-interest loan. It's a 32-unit building, so that's $72,000 in gift money and another $72,000 in low-interest loans. Rents range from $700-1500 with most of the units being very small (300 sq foot range). It's not all that difficult to find market rate apartments in the area for $700/month. Given, they won't be nearly as nice... but given the shortage of welfare housing funds, I question the point in giving away $72,000 per unit and tying up another $72,000 per unit to provide welfare housing that has the same rents as market rate apartments in the same area.

San Francisco has a pilot project for 220 sq. foot apartments with rents ball-parked in the $1200-$1500 range. It's an interesting idea, but I'm not sure I really see the appeal.
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Old 01-26-2013, 03:02 AM
 
Location: Southern California
15,087 posts, read 17,558,796 times
Reputation: 10299
Quote:
Originally Posted by nykiddo718718 View Post
Your neighborhood doesn't compare in land value, so obviously it's much cheaper.

Your comparing apples and oranges. The type of people who would move into these micro-apartments are singles and couples not seeking a home in Southern California. They want a car free, walkable, diverse, dense, energetic urban neighborhood with an unlimited number of nearby cultural, nightlife, restaurants, museums, schools, ect. Most of those structural amenities I pointed out are normally only found in newer high end luxury condos here.
Fair enough. But I'm single and can be in downtown LA in about 1.5 hours if I needed to (and I have done this many times without issue); I'll take the orange over the apple anytime.

[because money is money]
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Old 01-26-2013, 06:45 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,098,346 times
Reputation: 3117
Without comment on subsidy and what a better deal it is to live somewhere 90 minutes away:

I've seen some very creative designs for this type of place. The small square footage serves as an inspiration to use every available inch, and also as a deterrent to accumulate lots of stuff.

I once lived in a ~125 sq foot place in a renovated SRO hotel. It was not fancy but laid out in such a way that it wasn't cramped for one person. I really liked it.

This was my favorite of the Youtube bunch:

http://youtu.be/8RbxkrmuQ5E

It's all about location. Would I live in such a place in downtown Ames Iowa? No. San Francisco? Sure. It's a good way for folks who are perhaps fans of spartan living already to spend within their means and still get to live where they want.

Obviously being childless helps
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Old 01-26-2013, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,366 posts, read 59,807,408 times
Reputation: 54006
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Obviously being childless helps
Spouseless and catless, too.

Those are some pretty clever ideas; kinda makes me want to go minimalist.

My first apartment out of college was 15 x 20, not counting the bathroom -- which, ironically, was the largest bathroom I've ever had.
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