U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-10-2014, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,407,579 times
Reputation: 2581

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
Walkability is important, density not as much. Density is just a good gauge at quickly finding possible walkable places, it can be dense and not walkable. People want to live in cities where they can walk to places and built around people. Many downtowns were very walkable, but density fairly low, albeit growing in last 10 years. Many rich old home historic neighborhoods are walkable and not dense. Many dense suburban areas that are living lots of multi families are dense on paper but not walkable.
This.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-10-2014, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,407,579 times
Reputation: 2581
Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
It seems like people care more about density and walkability than things like cost of living, wages, median household income, unemployment rate, etc...

So what makes Density and Walkability so important?
Living in a place that's pedestrian-friendly and/or bike friendly can convince an individual to give up on the car and not have to deal with the hassles of car insurance (Which is often included in many COL stats) and car maintenance and of course, traffic and gas prices that can climb high during certain overseas events, seasonal weather activity, and holiday travel seasons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2014, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,407,579 times
Reputation: 2581
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
Generally speaking, I think density and walkability have become much more in vogue in the US in recent years due to several different factors:

Cost-Benefit Reasons

- The growing expenses of owning a car (fuel and insurance).
- Traffic congestion/commuting times beginning to severely affect quality of life.
- Cost of building/maintaining auto infrastructure is simply not sustainable at current rates.

Cultural Reasons

- Placing higher value on unique, historic places (which by and large are our urban cores) in an era of "sameness" and globalization.
- Valuing more social interaction/connection/experiences and "cultural enrichment" -- this is much better facilitated by in an urban/walkable environment than a less-dense environment.

It's important to note that prior to the great era of suburbanization in the US, density/walkability weren't seen as "trendy" -- it was the norm. It just seems that we are finally returning to those roots.
Agreed fully with this post, especially with the part in bold as the population continues to get bigger. Essentially doubling or even tripling the amount of cars on the highways, turning them into massive parking lots stretching for miles upon miles upon miles.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2014, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,335,763 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
There is a pretty wide selection of affordable eco friendly cars now days
Traffic is worse in cities that are more dense compared to spread out cities
Building roads and freeways is much cheaper than building rail lines and train cars
Building roads for private car transit is WAY more expensive than building mass transit for the masses! I've heard that argument before too but it has no weight when u consider the apples to apples comparison of building both networks to support 80% or more of the population.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2014, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Earth
1,307 posts, read 1,259,528 times
Reputation: 1436
Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
Walkability is important, density not as much. Density is just a good gauge at quickly finding possible walkable places, it can be dense and not walkable. People want to live in cities where they can walk to places and built around people. Many downtowns were very walkable, but density fairly low, albeit growing in last 10 years. Many rich old home historic neighborhoods are walkable and not dense. Many dense suburban areas that are living lots of multi families are dense on paper but not walkable.
You could compare Boston and Miami to illustrate your point. Both cities have roughly 12,000 people per square mile, but Boston is much more walkable. Sometimes it depends on how the city is set up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2014, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Earth
1,307 posts, read 1,259,528 times
Reputation: 1436
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post

I'm not sure what is so enticing about the density of New York City where all the streets are teeming with people, you'd be hard pressed to find a spot in the city where you can enjoy peace and quiet. There's something to be desired about living in the suburbs, a small town, out in the country, or just a more spaced out neighborhood right by the city. Space, peace, land of your own, a car, less noise, less stress, less busy. I don't know, perhaps that way of thinking and the people who clamor for that kind of life is shrinking.
I have to respectfully disagree with you on your last point. Sure, there are a lot of people all over NYC, there are still plenty of places to get some peace and quiet. Even Manhattan has some nice parks uptown where there are very few people, and lots of peace and quiet. Plus, Staten Island has more of a suburban feel and there are many places that most people would never believe were NYC. Same with with Queens and parts of the Bronx and Brooklyn.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2014, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,335,763 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by bolehboleh View Post
You could compare Boston and Miami to illustrate your point. Both cities have roughly 12,000 people per square mile, but Boston is much more walkable. Sometimes it depends on how the city is set up.
That's a perfect illustration of "walkable" vs. "densely populated" and how they are not always two of the sme thing!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2014, 09:24 PM
 
9,524 posts, read 14,881,852 times
Reputation: 9769
Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
It seems like people care more about density and walkability than things like cost of living, wages, median household income, unemployment rate, etc...

So what makes Density and Walkability so important?
Well, this is the urban planning forum and not the economy forum. Density and walkability are a lot more directly a part of urban planning than cost of living, wages, median household income, etc. Everyone agrees cost of living should be low and wages and household income should be high, of course :-)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2014, 09:31 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,100,107 times
Reputation: 14811
Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Well, this is the urban planning forum and not the economy forum. Density and walkability are a lot more directly a part of urban planning than cost of living, wages, median household income, etc. Everyone agrees cost of living should be low and wages and household income should be high, of course :-)


This was moved from the General US forum to the Urban Planning forum.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2014, 09:36 PM
 
Location: San Jose
2,179 posts, read 657,533 times
Reputation: 2326
Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
It seems like people care more about density and walkability than things like cost of living, wages, median household income, unemployment rate, etc...

So what makes Density and Walkability so important?
For a few years I lived in a medium density area that was very walkable, I walked to work, to the store, to eat, to bars, etc. After my first 6 months there I lost 25 pounds, and this is without changing my diet. To me, walkability means there is a lot to do and see within a relatively short walking distance. So walkability is healthier, more social, better for the environment, cheaper, more engaging etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top