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Old 10-15-2014, 04:21 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by chirack View Post
I grew up in an city therefore the whole area was walk able and anyone who didn't have an car was expected to use public transit and most high school kids rode the bus. I find it hilarious when people think walk ability is small stores, cafes, and the like and not things like sidewalks and crosswalks.

Colleges are walk able because it does not make sense to drive between buildings that are close together. It also is not the first experience of walk ability unless you grew up in an very auto-centric burb. My guess is that for some the ability to get anywhere without an car is so shinny and novel they haven't been around long enough to know the downsides or why people might very well choose to drive.
Because sidewalks and crosswalks are such a basic they're a given. No, it's not my first experience of walkable (besides suburban downtowns, visiting big cities), but the first living long-term. Obviously, I understand why people might choose to drive, but most of the time I was (and often still am) happy not driving.
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Old 10-15-2014, 04:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Because sidewalks and crosswalks are such a basic they're a given. No, it's not my first experience of walkable (besides suburban downtowns, visiting big cities), but thue first living long-term. Obviously, I understand why people might choose to drive, but most of the time I was (and often still am) happy not driving.
They are not given in the burbs. I know lots of places that lack sidewalks and crosswalks and are very dangerous or messy to cross or walk in. Those places are truly not walk able. There are also lots of nice residential areas where you could be far from retail but are very walk able due to sidewalks, cross walks, or streets that are not through streets.
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Old 10-15-2014, 04:36 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
They are not given in the burbs. I know lots of places that lack sidewalks and crosswalks and are very dangerous or messy to cross or walk in. Those places are truly not walk able. There are also lots of nice residential areas where you could be far from retail but are very walk able due to sidewalks, cross walks, or streets that are not through streets.
Given in the sense they're basic it's assumed any place in the slightest walk able would have them. If it's far from retail, I can't see how that'd can't be walk able, but that's a topic for the thread
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Old 10-15-2014, 04:39 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Given in the sense they're basic it's assumed any place in the slightest walk able would have them. If it's far from retail, I can't see how that'd can't be walk able, but that's a topic for the thread
Well you could want to walk to an friend's house or to an church or gasp to an park or for your kids to walk to school. However what people want here are city style amenities which are the coffee bar, restaurants, and boutique stores.
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Old 10-15-2014, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
I grew up in an city therefore the whole area was walk able and anyone who didn't have an car was expected to use public transit and most high school kids rode the bus. I find it hilarious when people think walk ability is small stores, cafes, and the like and not things like sidewalks and crosswalks.

Colleges are walk able because it does not make sense to drive between buildings that are close together. It also is not the first experience of walk ability unless you grew up in an very auto-centric burb. My guess is that for some the ability to get anywhere without an car is so shinny and novel they haven't been around long enough to know the downsides or why people might very well choose to drive.
One is things you walk to, the other is things you walk on, both are relative when it comes to walkability.
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Old 10-15-2014, 04:43 PM
 
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
One is things you walk to, the other is things you walk on, both are relative when it comes to walkability.
Not really. An example of an lack of walk ability is when I have my car in the shop in the burbs and am forced to walk to an restaurant to get something to eat. Simple enough in the city but downright dangerous in the burbs due to lack of side walk, cross walk, lights that give enough time to get across the road and so on.
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Old 10-15-2014, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Not really. An example of an lack of walk ability is when I have my car in the shop in the burbs and am forced to walk to an restaurant to get something to eat. Simple enough in the city but downright dangerous in the burbs due to lack of side walk, cross walk, lights that give enough time to get across the road and so on.
Yes, they go hand in hand. If you don't have sidewalks and crosswalks, it isn't a walkable place. If you have nothing to walk to nearby then it too is an unwalkable place.
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Old 10-15-2014, 04:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Yes, they go hand in hand. If you don't have sidewalks and crosswalks, it isn't a walkable place. If you have nothing to walk to nearby then it too is an unwalkable place.
I don't buy the second part at all. There can be all sorts of things to walk to parks, schools, other people's houses, bus stops and train stations all of which are useful.
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Old 10-15-2014, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by chirack View Post
I don't buy the second part at all. There can be all sorts of things to walk to parks, schools, other people's houses, bus stops and train stations all of which are useful.
If bus stops, train stations, schools, or any other thing that is a destination, then the area isn't walkable.

My parents live in the suburbs with nothing in walking distance other than a neighbor's house. The nearest bus stop is a couple miles away for a bus that comes once an hour. I live in a walkable neighborhood that has schools, churches, parks, shops, restaurants, and transit all within walking distance.

Both have sidewalks and crosswalks, but only one is a walkable neighborhood.
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Old 10-15-2014, 05:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
If bus stops, train stations, schools, or any other thing that is a destination, then the area isn't walkable.

My parents live in the suburbs with nothing in walking distance other than a neighbor's house. The nearest bus stop is a couple miles away for a bus that comes once an hour. I live in a walkable neighborhood that has schools, churches, parks, shops, restaurants, and transit all within walking distance.

Both have sidewalks and crosswalks, but only one is a walkable neighborhood.
That is the part I don't agree with. If you can walk or bike the an bus station, you can use it. There are lots of places in the burbs where either biking or walking to the bus isn't safe or is not possible. If you can walk to an neighbor's house likewise.
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