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Old 04-03-2016, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Tim Cook took a pretty strong position regarding Apple's commitment to protect the sanctity of our iPhone data in his recent keynote address. Apple Event - Keynote March 2016 - Apple

So now that the the FBI has managed to hack into that encrypted 5s iPhone I'm wondering if Apple doesn't feel an obligation to build even stronger encryption into its future iPhones?
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Old 04-03-2016, 07:32 PM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
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From what I've read, the encryption process itself was not hacked. What they did was somehow bypass the password protection of the "10 bad tries wipes the data" process. It's that process that may need tightened up, rather than the encryption of the data itself.
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Old 04-04-2016, 10:17 PM
i7pXFLbhE3gq
 
n/a posts
Simple solution - don't use a numeric passcode.

A good alphanumeric password (with special characters) is essentially impossible to guess by brute force.
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Old 04-04-2016, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Ocala, FL
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Keep in mind that it appears that the Isreali-based corporation Cellebrite was the one who cracked the code. Not too much details of how it was actually done. This was not the result of some amateur hackers. I don't think Apple has any fault and I believe they believe in the privacy of their customers.
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Old 04-16-2016, 11:48 AM
 
1,153 posts, read 1,414,038 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CptnRn View Post
Tim Cook took a pretty strong position regarding Apple's commitment to protect the sanctity of our iPhone data in his recent keynote address. Apple Event - Keynote March 2016 - Apple

So now that the the FBI has managed to hack into that encrypted 5s iPhone I'm wondering if Apple doesn't feel an obligation to build even stronger encryption into its future iPhones?
Yeah, this may become the phone of choice for Islamic radicals.

I am selling mine today on Swappa. Got a Samsung to replace it.

With his anti-government, pro-terrorist, anti-Christian, pro-LGBT stance, this guy and his company doesn't get another dime from me, even a 99 cent app or song. And I certainly won't give them free advertisement by having one of their disgusting phones. I hope the company suffers the worst losses in its history after these terrible mistakes they are making. I hope Cook resigns or is fired over this.

Steve Jobs would have never done these stupid moves getting into patriots and Christian's faces about his views. Many of us couldn't care less about his self-righteous views on these topics. He's discriminating againist people of faith using tolerance as a disguise.
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Old 04-16-2016, 12:15 PM
i7pXFLbhE3gq
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hobo7396 View Post
Yeah, this may become the phone of choice for Islamic radicals.

I am selling mine today on Swappa. Got a Samsung to replace it.

With his anti-government, pro-terrorist, anti-Christian, pro-LGBT stance, this guy and his company doesn't get another dime from me, even a 99 cent app or song. And I certainly won't give them free advertisement by having one of their disgusting phones. I hope the company suffers the worst losses in its history after these terrible mistakes they are making. I hope Cook resigns or is fired over this.

Steve Jobs would have never done these stupid moves getting into patriots and Christian's faces about his views. Many of us couldn't care less about his self-righteous views on these topics. He's discriminating againist people of faith using tolerance as a disguise.
Hmm...

You're going to need to avoid Airbnb, eBay, LinkedIn, Meetup, Reedid, Amazon, Box, Cisco, Dropbox, Everynote, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Mozilla, AT&T, etc.

Best throw that Samsung phone in the trash since Google isn't on board with gross violations of American's privacy either. Don't forget you can't get a Windows phone either. Oh and stop using your computer.

Pretty much the entire tech industry took Apple's side in this. Only ignorant people and those who hate privacy oppose them.

There's nothing "patriotic" about invading end user privacy.

Oh, and Google doesn't hate gay people either...
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Old 04-18-2016, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
13,058 posts, read 15,170,579 times
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I'm not ignorant. I'm not anti privacy. I do think Apple should have helped.

Although I at no time thought they would find a thing on the phone..so far that is correct.

I think saving lives trumps all...
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Old 04-18-2016, 06:56 PM
 
41,823 posts, read 44,977,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CptnRn View Post
So now that the the FBI has managed to hack into that encrypted 5s iPhone I'm wondering if Apple doesn't feel an obligation to build even stronger encryption into its future iPhones?
It's unclear if they have actually been able to extract decrypted data. None of these news releases specifically mention them accessing readable data.

This is two part system and is present in one form or another on many systems, it simply makes using very strong encryption easy. The data itself is encrypted using an extremely long encryption key, no one is going to remember it and keeping it accessible such as on a USB stick is really not a good idea.

The other part stores this encryption key. You can use short passwords because it can be set to do a variety of things when the wrong password is entered. Destroy the key, destroy the data, slow down entries etc. This also performs a variety of security checks such as checking the integrity of the system by talking to the data storage etc.

Speculation is they have only managed separate these systems allowing them to extract encrypted data from the phone. If that is the case the key is still locked away and the data is still encrypted, they might as well be at square one.
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Old 04-18-2016, 06:58 PM
 
41,823 posts, read 44,977,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reed303 View Post
From what I've read, the encryption process itself was not hacked. What they did was somehow bypass the password protection of the "10 bad tries wipes the data" process. It's that process that may need tightened up, rather than the encryption of the data itself.
That specific phone incorporates the OS, the newer versions are all hardware based.

https://www.quora.com/What-is-Apple%...s-it-important
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Old 04-18-2016, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Sierra Nevada Land, CA
9,303 posts, read 10,411,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonF View Post
Simple solution - don't use a numeric passcode.

A good alphanumeric password (with special characters) is essentially impossible to guess by brute force.
Better solution: have nothing to hide. My iPhone is not used for anything nefarious or important financially. Plus I am not a nefarious sort of guy. I don't even have it passcode protected. Why? No need. If it gets lost or stolen I can turn it into a brick, or at least locked via Mrs5150's iPhone at will and visa versa. 15 second process. Wonderful app is Find My iPhone!

And yea, my Apple account password is alphanumeric with eight characters.

Banking: done on the desktop at home

Purchases: done with cash or plastic. Credit/Debit cards are incredibility thin and take up less space than a set of keys. Cash is nice. No chance of identity theft or if you are nefarious, no paper trail.

I think that people who use their phone for everything are setting themselves up for trouble should their phone get lost, stolen or subpoenaed.

And to those who are monitoring my posts, please note that I am a retired government employee, who worked with LE.

Last edited by Mr5150; 04-18-2016 at 07:30 PM..
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