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Old 09-10-2013, 03:25 AM
 
Location: Past: midwest, east coast
603 posts, read 736,439 times
Reputation: 623

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Originally Posted by Tekkie View Post
Which only contributes more to the fragmentation and death of the entire region. As 313Weather mentioned, the population decline speaks volumes about how well this region is doing. The people who are here now have been here for decades (old money). People eventually die though. And there aren't a whole lot of young, vibrant professionals moving to this region and setting up shop, at least from outside the state. That'll only lead to more population decline and ultimately more trouble for the entire region years down the road.
The region as a whole is not attractive to young graduates and even established professionals from around the country because it has such a poor reputation due to the city of Detroit. People like thriving urban cores. Every respectable metro in the country has a decent downtown with retail, shopping, tourists, and corporate offices. Detroit's urban planning is also quite poor, as the city is not walkable like other cities.

When I lived in metro Detroit I really found no reason to enter the city limits. Aside from the occasional sports event there was very little to do or see. I visited the auto show annually and waterfront a few times a year, that's all. The DIA is the type of place you go to once and don't need to see again for several years. What does somebody staying in the Westin Book Cadillac do at night? In other cities you can go for a stroll, find a nice restaurant, and walk amongst other tourists and locals looking for an enjoyable night out in town. I live in a suburb of Seattle now and find myself traveling to the city quite often. There's plenty of business, well-paying jobs, tourist attractions, and it's got that "walkability-factor." Detroit can manage to become a respectable city, but the current leadership (outside of Kevyn Orr) gives me no reason to feel optimistic.

A key problem is that the majority of Detroit's residents are illiterate, unemployed, do not pay taxes, and rely on government support (it sounds harsh but it's true). The first thing Detroit needs to do is rebuild its tax base. That means that it should be much easier to start a business than it is now. There are plenty of empty skyscrapers waiting for multi-national corporate tenants to fill up. Inviting business attracts educated, high-earning folks into the city. More opportunities for growth will pop up that way, and more people will start investing in the city. I'm in my early 20s and hope that someday I can see my hometown be respected and see the Lions hoist the Vince Lomardi trophy.

Last edited by Bimmerfanboy; 09-10-2013 at 03:41 AM..
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Old 09-10-2013, 09:51 AM
 
3,083 posts, read 4,796,674 times
Reputation: 3524
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seatown1 View Post
The region as a whole is not attractive to young graduates and even established professionals from around the country because it has such a poor reputation due to the city of Detroit. People like thriving urban cores. Every respectable metro in the country has a decent downtown with retail, shopping, tourists, and corporate offices. Detroit's urban planning is also quite poor, as the city is not walkable like other cities.

When I lived in metro Detroit I really found no reason to enter the city limits. Aside from the occasional sports event there was very little to do or see. I visited the auto show annually and waterfront a few times a year, that's all. The DIA is the type of place you go to once and don't need to see again for several years. What does somebody staying in the Westin Book Cadillac do at night? In other cities you can go for a stroll, find a nice restaurant, and walk amongst other tourists and locals looking for an enjoyable night out in town. I live in a suburb of Seattle now and find myself traveling to the city quite often. There's plenty of business, well-paying jobs, tourist attractions, and it's got that "walkability-factor." Detroit can manage to become a respectable city, but the current leadership (outside of Kevyn Orr) gives me no reason to feel optimistic.

A key problem is that the majority of Detroit's residents are illiterate, unemployed, do not pay taxes, and rely on government support (it sounds harsh but it's true). The first thing Detroit needs to do is rebuild its tax base. That means that it should be much easier to start a business than it is now. There are plenty of empty skyscrapers waiting for multi-national corporate tenants to fill up. Inviting business attracts educated, high-earning folks into the city. More opportunities for growth will pop up that way, and more people will start investing in the city. I'm in my early 20s and hope that someday I can see my hometown be respected and see the Lions hoist the Vince Lomardi trophy.
I agree with your post. Not sure when you last visited Detroit. I moved away in 2008 and just came back this summer. It certainly is not a Chicago or Seattle for that matter, but it has made tremendous progress in the Downtown and Midtown neighborhoods. As I mentioned in another thread, it'll probably be a few decades before it really improves unless the attitude of the region changes as a whole to one that is pro-Detroit.
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Old 09-10-2013, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Poshawa, Ontario
2,986 posts, read 3,450,435 times
Reputation: 5622
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seatown1 View Post
When I lived in metro Detroit I really found no reason to enter the city limits. Aside from the occasional sports event there was very little to do or see. I visited the auto show annually and waterfront a few times a year, that's all. The DIA is the type of place you go to once and don't need to see again for several years. What does somebody staying in the Westin Book Cadillac do at night? In other cities you can go for a stroll, find a nice restaurant, and walk amongst other tourists and locals looking for an enjoyable night out in town.
Exactly.

My wife and I were in Detroit last November to see the Lions/Packers game. She found it very unnerving that at 5:00 on Saturday night, there seemed to be nobody in the downtown core with the exception of other NFL fans from our tour bus. It felt like the "town that feared sundown" or something. It certainly didn't feel like any other town or city I have ever spent the night in. For what is technically a "major" U.S. city, there seemed to be precious little to do on a Saturday night outside visiting the casinos, and the general atmosphere of the city made one wary about walking around too much after dark.
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Old 09-10-2013, 04:35 PM
 
Location: west mich
5,739 posts, read 6,046,101 times
Reputation: 2120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annuvin View Post
Exactly.

My wife and I were in Detroit last November to see the Lions/Packers game. She found it very unnerving that at 5:00 on Saturday night, there seemed to be nobody in the downtown core with the exception of other NFL fans from our tour bus. It felt like the "town that feared sundown" or something. It certainly didn't feel like any other town or city I have ever spent the night in. For what is technically a "major" U.S. city, there seemed to be precious little to do on a Saturday night outside visiting the casinos, and the general atmosphere of the city made one wary about walking around too much after dark.
Downtown Detroit still suffers from ill-advised earlier anti-residency business-only ordinances. I still don't understand the reasoning behind them.
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Old 09-10-2013, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Here.
14,551 posts, read 13,295,633 times
Reputation: 17041
Quote:
Originally Posted by detwahDJ View Post
Downtown Detroit still suffers from ill-advised earlier anti-residency business-only ordinances. I still don't understand the reasoning behind them.
This is the first I've heard of that. Any more info? I just figured people didn't want to live down there.
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Old 09-10-2013, 06:34 PM
 
Location: west mich
5,739 posts, read 6,046,101 times
Reputation: 2120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Retroit View Post
This is the first I've heard of that. Any more info? I just figured people didn't want to live down there.
Now I'm thinking it could have been just zoning, but it was way before the internet.
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Old 09-10-2013, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Here.
14,551 posts, read 13,295,633 times
Reputation: 17041
Quote:
Originally Posted by detwahDJ View Post
Now I'm thinking it could have been just zoning, but it was way before the internet.
Yeah, the zoning laws tend to separate business and residential. For example, you don't find a lot of businesses with apartment units above them like you used to. I think this was for fire prevention.

I just never heard of an effort to restrict residential zoning altogether downtown. Not saying it didn't happen though.
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Old 09-11-2013, 05:48 PM
 
530 posts, read 1,418,050 times
Reputation: 215
You posters are correct. The Detroit shock wave is rippling through the tri-county area.

Ann Arbor/Wastenaw should annex the Canton Territory before Livonia falls.

In regards to population growth, it’s curtains for Wayne County.

Figure 3

http://library.semcog.org/InmagicGen...kFacts2012.pdf
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Old 09-11-2013, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Here.
14,551 posts, read 13,295,633 times
Reputation: 17041
Figure 4...Wow! 20,000+ building permits a year in the early 2000s with stagnant population growth?!?! No wonder Detroit has so many vacant homes. Seems to me it would be nice if the number of building permits issued could be predicated on the growth of population. It makes no sense to build so many homes when we know that the vacant ones have no chance of finding occupants.

Regional authority...I'm pulling for you!
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