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Old 06-23-2020, 01:34 AM
 
444 posts, read 221,608 times
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I was diagnosed a month ago or so through telephone doctor appointment. I filed a report to my employer because it is related to my job, typing a lot but for me specifically using the mouse a lot for copy & paste.

Due to coronavirus, I work from home, paperless and it’s never been done this way.

My employer is far behind on technology and I don’t know how long I have to wait for them to be more technically advanced to avoid repetitive movements.

Anyone who has Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, how much did this affect your job security? I feel afraid during these COVID-19 and economy.
Is it possible to continue to work or will it get worse?
Has anyone gone on disability due to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? How had did it get before you went on disability?
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Old 06-23-2020, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Northern Maine
5,427 posts, read 1,995,610 times
Reputation: 7906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Torontobase View Post
I was diagnosed a month ago or so through telephone doctor appointment. I filed a report to my employer because it is related to my job, typing a lot but for me specifically using the mouse a lot for copy & paste.

Due to coronavirus, I work from home, paperless and it’s never been done this way.

My employer is far behind on technology and I don’t know how long I have to wait for them to be more technically advanced to avoid repetitive movements.

Anyone who has Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, how much did this affect your job security? I feel afraid during these COVID-19 and economy.
Is it possible to continue to work or will it get worse?
Has anyone gone on disability due to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? How had did it get before you went on disability?
My business partner had it, surgery wasn't a big deal and she was back working in a short time, I think we went on vacation for 3 weeks and she recovered during or soon after.
I don't recall it limiting us too greatly.
We ran a bakery.
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Old 06-23-2020, 02:40 PM
 
Location: on the wind
10,732 posts, read 4,872,000 times
Reputation: 35636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Torontobase View Post
I was diagnosed a month ago or so through telephone doctor appointment. I filed a report to my employer because it is related to my job, typing a lot but for me specifically using the mouse a lot for copy & paste.

Due to coronavirus, I work from home, paperless and it’s never been done this way.

My employer is far behind on technology and I don’t know how long I have to wait for them to be more technically advanced to avoid repetitive movements.

Anyone who has Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, how much did this affect your job security? I feel afraid during these COVID-19 and economy.
Is it possible to continue to work or will it get worse?
Has anyone gone on disability due to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? How had did it get before you went on disability?
I don't have CTS but have friends who do and they've talked a lot about it. It is very common but many different actions can trigger it. Solutions that might work best for you are not cut and dried. It will probably get worse if you+your employer don't find ways to fix the ergonomic problem that's creating/contributing to the CTS. As with most repetitive motion injuries much better to take action earlier than later. It could well be that your workspace at home is the catalyst for the current problem while the workspace at the office didn't happen to promote CTS. There are things you can do to slow down or even stop progression including icing, anti-inflammatories, stretching, exercises, changing your keyboard and mouse technique, workstation adjustments, wrist braces, etc. Filing a worker's comp claim can help get things started because it starts the clock to take corrective action.

There are lots of web resources about CTS. Here are a few links to non-dot com sites (that tend to be less biased toward selling you a product):

https://www.theadventurouswriter.com...oms-treatment/

https://www.webmd.com/pain-managemen...nel-syndrome#1

https://officesolutionpro.com/how-to...e-when-typing/

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-...s/syc-20355603
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Old 06-23-2020, 07:13 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,861 posts, read 7,938,690 times
Reputation: 16729
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
I don't have CTS but have friends who do and they've talked a lot about it. It is very common but many different actions can trigger it. Solutions that might work best for you are not cut and dried. It will probably get worse if you+your employer don't find ways to fix the ergonomic problem that's creating/contributing to the CTS. As with most repetitive motion injuries much better to take action earlier than later. It could well be that your workspace at home is the catalyst for the current problem while the workspace at the office didn't happen to promote CTS. There are things you can do to slow down or even stop progression including icing, anti-inflammatories, stretching, exercises, changing your keyboard and mouse technique, workstation adjustments, wrist braces, etc. Filing a worker's comp claim can help get things started because it starts the clock to take corrective action.

There are lots of web resources about CTS. Here are a few links to non-dot com sites (that tend to be less biased toward selling you a product):

https://www.theadventurouswriter.com...oms-treatment/

https://www.webmd.com/pain-managemen...nel-syndrome#1

https://officesolutionpro.com/how-to...e-when-typing/

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-...s/syc-20355603
Good sources, thanks. I just had carpal tunnel release surgery on my right hand, so while I was fiddling around with the measures used to alleviate the symptoms, I read everything I could find about the topic. In my case the carpal tunnel had either appeared or a pre-existing case aggrevated by a distal radial fracture of my wrist in February, and after several months of conservative measures (splinting, ice, rest as I could, OTC antiinflammatories) didn't help, and symptoms worsening, finding using my fingers for fine motor skills getting more difficult, the ortho doc recommended surgery. It's much better and I expect more improvement as time goes on.

Unless the OP is considering short term disability while he/ she is treating the CT conservatively, and is perhaps unable to, or has to cut back on the work duties, I can't see that permanent disability would be granted just based on a having the symptoms for a short time, or before all the measures to alleviate the carpal tunnel (including surgery, unless the OP is not a candidate for some reason) over time are tried and documented.

From what I read, the symptoms of CT are classic (tingling, numbness, pain in the thumb, first two fingers and half the ring finger, along with the palm on that side, waking at night with this, and these could be described by a patient to a physician in a telehealth visit. The doctor could even ask the patient to perform a couple of the tests (involving pressure on the wrist over the median nerve, positioning the hands back to back with the wrists bent) which may bring on the symptoms, suggesting the diagnosis. But from what I also read there are nerve conduction tests (electromyography) that are used to show loss of nerve conduction to the fingers, and these cinch the diagnosis of CT. The bad news is that you can't do these tests at home, so a face to face visit to the doc/testing center would be needed.

I'd speculate that any disability claim for CT would also have to include documented nerve conduction test results, as well as the conservative measures over time to alleviate the CT. I'd wonder if they'd even consider disability before surgery was done in the event the conservative measures failed, considering the high rate of success that CT surgery offers in "curing" the syndrome.

Though as you mention, Parnassia, if the CT is work related in the OP's case (sounds as though it could be) workman's comp could foot the bill for any medical bills incurred in treating it.
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Old 06-23-2020, 08:47 PM
 
Location: planet earth
6,666 posts, read 2,796,974 times
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If you want to get better without surgery, google "natural remedies carpal tunnel syndrome."

In the meantime, put your hands straight up, and shake them and wiggle your fingers (with your arms straight up) several times per day.

I worked for workers' comp insurance companies for years, and carpal tunnel is one thing that is over-diagnosed by mill types of doctors - lots of scams out there to get that workers' comp $$$.

I would not have anyone slice my wrists for any reason. I have seen a lot of films and pictures of surgeries and it is not for me.

I am sure I would have been a candidate, but am not into slicing and dicing to fix things.

I think I have read of some supplements that are helpful - not sure what they are off the top of my head, but if you do a google search on natural remedies, you should find them.
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Old 06-23-2020, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Southern California
27,779 posts, read 10,455,567 times
Reputation: 17725
Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
If you want to get better without surgery, google "natural remedies carpal tunnel syndrome."

In the meantime, put your hands straight up, and shake them and wiggle your fingers (with your arms straight up) several times per day.

I worked for workers' comp insurance companies for years, and carpal tunnel is one thing that is over-diagnosed by mill types of doctors - lots of scams out there to get that workers' comp $$$.

I would not have anyone slice my wrists for any reason. I have seen a lot of films and pictures of surgeries and it is not for me.

I am sure I would have been a candidate, but am not into slicing and dicing to fix things.

I think I have read of some supplements that are helpful - not sure what they are off the top of my head, but if you do a google search on natural remedies, you should find them.
I'm in total agreement here. CTS scams all over the place...And yes there is a lot of info on doing a lot of your own healing for the CTS.
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Old Yesterday, 12:08 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
26,625 posts, read 30,901,300 times
Reputation: 33185
Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
If you want to get better without surgery, google "natural remedies carpal tunnel syndrome."

In the meantime, put your hands straight up, and shake them and wiggle your fingers (with your arms straight up) several times per day.

I worked for workers' comp insurance companies for years, and carpal tunnel is one thing that is over-diagnosed by mill types of doctors - lots of scams out there to get that workers' comp $$$.

I would not have anyone slice my wrists for any reason. I have seen a lot of films and pictures of surgeries and it is not for me.

I am sure I would have been a candidate, but am not into slicing and dicing to fix things.

I think I have read of some supplements that are helpful - not sure what they are off the top of my head, but if you do a google search on natural remedies, you should find them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
I'm in total agreement here. CTS scams all over the place...And yes there is a lot of info on doing a lot of your own healing for the CTS.
Carpal tunnel syndrome has characteristic symptoms and can, as has been pointed out in posts above, be confirmed by testing for damage to the nerve. It is not a scam.

It is caused by pressure on the median nerve from a ligament in the wrist. Surgery is usually curative, and can now be done through one or two tiny incisions.

https://www.uwhealth.org/health/topi.../hw212492.html
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Old Yesterday, 02:28 AM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
40,693 posts, read 50,858,329 times
Reputation: 114430
My wife recently had surgery for carpel tunnel on both wrists. Each surgery was about 6 weeks apart. Small incisions, small amount of recovery pain, Aleve or Tylenol for relief. She is extremely happy with the results. Before surgery she couldn't use either hand, since then everything is back to normal.
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Old Yesterday, 02:50 AM
 
18,499 posts, read 8,756,664 times
Reputation: 17536
I needed a brace once, and then re-arranging the work space.
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Old Yesterday, 06:04 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,861 posts, read 7,938,690 times
Reputation: 16729
Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
If you want to get better without surgery, google "natural remedies carpal tunnel syndrome."

In the meantime, put your hands straight up, and shake them and wiggle your fingers (with your arms straight up) several times per day.

I worked for workers' comp insurance companies for years, and carpal tunnel is one thing that is over-diagnosed by mill types of doctors - lots of scams out there to get that workers' comp $$$.

I would not have anyone slice my wrists for any reason. I have seen a lot of films and pictures of surgeries and it is not for me.

I am sure I would have been a candidate, but am not into slicing and dicing to fix things.

I think I have read of some supplements that are helpful - not sure what they are off the top of my head, but if you do a google search on natural remedies, you should find them.
Yup, those measures help, along with icing, bracing, and OTC antiinflammatories, until they don't anymore.....

BTW, the medical establishment that you blindly bash does recommend these measures for people with CT syndrome, and they don't encourage jumping into surgery unless those measures don't improve the problem over a number of months, or there is evidence of nerve damage from the impingement of the median nerve. As evidenced by muscle atrophy of thumb muscle, severe numbness or pain that isn't relieved anymore with conservative measures, difficulty in using or inability to use the fingers in a coordinated way for fine motor skills ( handwriting, buttoning buttons), weakness with the grasp-dropping things.

I was at that point several months after a wrist injury from a fall ( including a radial fracture, soft tissue injuries), left inflammation and scar tissue, added to some arthritis already there impinged on the medial nerve making it lose function. Even still, once the cast came off, I tried the conservative measures for 3 months, and I sure was hoping things would improve. They didn't, and that is when surgery was recommended.

Don't know how you'd feel under such circumstances, but I'm happy to see my hand function coming back, especially since it's the dominant one.

Last edited by Travelassie; Yesterday at 06:30 AM..
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