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Old 12-27-2019, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Somewhere gray and damp, close to the West Coast
12,481 posts, read 2,329,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
She deserves mother of the year.

Amen. Over my lifetime I have developed a unique and beautiful hand and I always feel like an artist when I write in cursive.
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Old 12-27-2019, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Somewhere gray and damp, close to the West Coast
12,481 posts, read 2,329,025 times
Reputation: 5360
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBCjunkie View Post
Count me among the "old fogies" who had NO idea that cursive (or as it was called during my childhood, "script") handwriting is no longer being taught to students, or that there is any literate person alive who would be unable to read it.

My son who was born in the mid-1980s was taught it, although he began shifting to printing during high school except for his signature. To be honest, I always thought he was simply being too lazy to bother taking the time to write non-signature things in a legible script. For myself, I have always found script/cursive to be much faster and easier than printing. All my to-do and shopping lists, post-it notes, etc., are written in script for that reason.

If it's true that postal employees actually have any difficulty reading cursive, I suppose I should start "dumbing down" to printing when I send greeting cards (and yes I do send those.) On the other hand, I have been assuming that almost all postal mail is now scanned by optical readers that are able to read all but the worst handwriting, and I do make sure that when I address envelopes or packages my handwriting is clear and legible.

I agree with HJ99 that as long as people are still writing in cursive, anyone who expects to get a job as an adult should be able to at least read it, even if they don't have the inclination or the ability to write in that format themselves.

What's next? Teaching kids that it's just as acceptable to write "u r" instead of "you are" in their English essays or term papers, merely because many people choose to use that format in text messages or even emails? (hint: I am not one of them.)

Don't get me started.

Me too for the bolded.
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Old 12-27-2019, 11:01 AM
 
5,774 posts, read 3,127,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
Have you ever looked at an original copy of the Constitution? It's like hieroglyphics to us now.

Anyone who has to read census data from 100 years ago for ancestry purposes has great difficulty doing it now, although we all know cursive.
^ I was going to say the same thing.

It was always something to look forward to in school--we were excited that we would learn cursive in the 2nd grade. It was actually something fun to learn.

I see both sides of the argument. I still like writing in cursive. It is a bit sad to see it slowly disappearing.
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Old 12-27-2019, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
24,279 posts, read 15,689,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundaydrive00 View Post
You ignored my question. Why does a post it note left for a co-worker have to be written in cursive? Everyone still knows how to write with pen and paper, even if its not in cursive.
I think you simply want to argue about something we probably don’t disagree abut that much. You do you.

Have a Happy New Year.
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Old 12-27-2019, 12:00 PM
 
Location: City Data Land
15,766 posts, read 9,149,328 times
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I'm appalled at how lazy our society has become. At the risk of sounding like a bitter old fogey, every day I hear, "Just text it," "Use a calculator," "Send an e-card rather than mailing a real one," "You don't get the discount without the app even though you, the customer, is standing right here." Etc. . . How about students learning cursive so they actually have to work at writing a little? I know in five years no student will be learning it, but it seems like a real shame. There are benefits to practicing it, even if they are small.


https://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebat...beyond-writing
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Old 12-27-2019, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Midwest
4,517 posts, read 7,379,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
She deserves mother of the year.
Yeah.

And handwriting, especially GOOD handwriting, will always be an asset. Good for this mom.

I've seen notes from people in their 20s and 30s, or possibly 40s who obviously weren't taught cursive. I know someone around my age who prints in all caps.

Getting a note that's printed in all caps or in childish printing automatically sets up a judgement of the writer. Cursive is not difficult to learn, it uses another part of the brain--that's how people can do handwriting analysis--and you won't hurt anyone by knowing this skill.

I have decent handwriting, I've worked on it over the years, and the occasional compliment of "you have beautiful handwriting" such as I recently received from a notary I was signing papers for is a nice thing to hear.

There's no downside to teaching or learning cursive.
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Old 12-27-2019, 03:21 PM
 
4,830 posts, read 2,087,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dwatted Wabbit View Post
Yeah.

And handwriting, especially GOOD handwriting, will always be an asset. Good for this mom.

I've seen notes from people in their 20s and 30s, or possibly 40s who obviously weren't taught cursive. I know someone around my age who prints in all caps.

Getting a note that's printed in all caps or in childish printing automatically sets up a judgement of the writer. Cursive is not difficult to learn, it uses another part of the brain--that's how people can do handwriting analysis--and you won't hurt anyone by knowing this skill.

I have decent handwriting, I've worked on it over the years, and the occasional compliment of "you have beautiful handwriting" such as I recently received from a notary I was signing papers for is a nice thing to hear.

There's no downside to teaching or learning cursive.
I had to spend time teaching it. There was a downside. We needed to spend time teaching other basic skills... Having to do the handwriting drills (up through sixth grade, even for honors students) took up time that was needed to teach reading, actual writing (not penmanship), etc... I thought teaching children to type and do so quickly would have been a more useful skill. I know in my job, the people who do poorly are the hunt and peckers. The fast typists do better.
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Old 12-29-2019, 09:11 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,045 posts, read 1,788,405 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
I had to spend time teaching it. There was a downside. We needed to spend time teaching other basic skills... Having to do the handwriting drills (up through sixth grade, even for honors students) took up time that was needed to teach reading, actual writing (not penmanship), etc... I thought teaching children to type and do so quickly would have been a more useful skill. I know in my job, the people who do poorly are the hunt and peckers. The fast typists do better.
Yes, typed papers tend to be received better (by teachers, editors, critics) than handwritten, in my experience. I think it's just that a typed ms. is usually much easier to read, & so saves the reader a lot of mechanical work, trying to decode handwriting.

Certainly my handwriting was nothing to write home about, & probably worse now. But give me a keyboard, & stand back ...
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Old 12-30-2019, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,715 posts, read 16,718,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southwest88 View Post
Yes, typed papers tend to be received better (by teachers, editors, critics) than handwritten, in my experience. I think it's just that a typed ms. is usually much easier to read, & so saves the reader a lot of mechanical work, trying to decode handwriting.

Certainly my handwriting was nothing to write home about, & probably worse now. But give me a keyboard, & stand back ...
Yeah, there's much higher value placed on typed communications than handwritten. The notable exception to that is sentimental stuff. If you're going to send a love letter, do it in handwritten. But who does that nowadays when you can just send your 1:00 booty call by text.
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