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Old 06-20-2017, 01:30 PM
 
8,673 posts, read 17,285,320 times
Reputation: 4685

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How can you move 150 pounds of salt without your own automobile?

1. Use a friend's automobile. Buy them beer or pizza if you feel guilty about it, or return the favor other ways.
2. Rent an automobile or a truck, by the day or by the hour. As mentioned above, Home Depot rents them by the hour.
3. Hire a taxi/uber/lyft.
4. Order online and have it delivered. There is no need to go to the store to pick out the very best bag of salt rock.
5. If you live close enough to the place that sells salt, throw it into a cart/wagon and roll it home.
6. In the near future, ask your robot to get it for you. They'll send for an autonomous delivery vehicle or whatever.

How often do you move 150 pounds of salt? Once a year? Probably not worth it to have a vehicle for an annual need. Twice a week? If you're going to be hauling cargo on the regular, then having a car is justifiable, you just have to pay for it, including its upkeep and parking.

In the long run, it's not so much about getting people out of their cars as having them not need to get cars in the first place. Sure, for a lot of the Boomers, you'll have to pry the steering wheel from their cold dead hands. But considering that the youngest of them are approaching 60, that won't take very long. Meanwhile, the Millenials are pretty much all adults now, and many of them were less interested in driving than their parents or grandparents--they don't have fond memories of driving to the malt shop like the Boomers did. GenXers are kind of "floaters" in this--we're pretty much up for whatever is the least hassle. As to the War Babies, well, we'll see how they turn out--the oldest are just now getting old enough to drive, although the numbers so far say they're driving later, if at all.
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Old 06-20-2017, 02:24 PM
 
2,090 posts, read 3,576,476 times
Reputation: 2390
I don't know why some of the suburbanites on this forum seem to have a problem with people renting cars instead of owning them. If someone isn't driving every day, all it means is more parking and less traffic for you, the car owner.
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Old 06-20-2017, 02:53 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
45,983 posts, read 53,496,782 times
Reputation: 15184
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
I didn't know they had hard water in the NYC area.
I assume that was a joke question? On Long Island, some would try to harden not soften the water, haven't heard of either in NYC. Smaller NYC apartments, or really a lot of apartments anywhere, aren't all that friendly for bulk shopping.
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Old 06-20-2017, 02:55 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
45,983 posts, read 53,496,782 times
Reputation: 15184
Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
You're running into the iron law of economics, here: supply and demand. Make yourself a downtown with all the jobs, and there's a _very_ limited supply of space around and within that downtown in which you can practically walk to work. So, if people want to walk to work, there's high demand, limited supply... and thus high price. You can't get around this with any sort of price-fixing scheme either; that just results in shortages and rationing by means other than price.
lessening density regulation would increase the supply; though just about everywhere you'd exhuast the amount of housing that could practically be built in walking distance for a large downtown, though of course not all city jobs are downtown.
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Old 06-20-2017, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,297 posts, read 120,779,853 times
Reputation: 35920
Quote:
Originally Posted by intok View Post
So, you're going to waste a ton of money getting 13 miles to the gallon in a pickup as your daily driver for the 2-3 times a year you might need to move something large over just getting that far cheaper to own and operate car? Sounds so "fiscally conservative" of you... Or maybe it's compensating for something...
You know what happens when you ass*U*me. Let that sink in a minute.



I drive a Honda CR-V. It gets around 28 city/34 highway mpg. My husband drives a Kia hybrid. So Embarrassed? Nah! You urbanists never are. Just roll on to the next topic.
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Old 06-20-2017, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,297 posts, read 120,779,853 times
Reputation: 35920
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
How can you move 150 pounds of salt without your own automobile?

1. Use a friend's automobile. Buy them beer or pizza if you feel guilty about it, or return the favor other ways.
2. Rent an automobile or a truck, by the day or by the hour. As mentioned above, Home Depot rents them by the hour.
3. Hire a taxi/uber/lyft.
4. Order online and have it delivered. There is no need to go to the store to pick out the very best bag of salt rock.
5. If you live close enough to the place that sells salt, throw it into a cart/wagon and roll it home.
6. In the near future, ask your robot to get it for you. They'll send for an autonomous delivery vehicle or whatever.

How often do you move 150 pounds of salt? Once a year? Probably not worth it to have a vehicle for an annual need. Twice a week? If you're going to be hauling cargo on the regular, then having a car is justifiable, you just have to pay for it, including its upkeep and parking.

In the long run, it's not so much about getting people out of their cars as having them not need to get cars in the first place. Sure, for a lot of the Boomers, you'll have to pry the steering wheel from their cold dead hands. But considering that the youngest of them are approaching 60, that won't take very long. Meanwhile, the Millenials are pretty much all adults now, and many of them were less interested in driving than their parents or grandparents--they don't have fond memories of driving to the malt shop like the Boomers did. GenXers are kind of "floaters" in this--we're pretty much up for whatever is the least hassle. As to the War Babies, well, we'll see how they turn out--the oldest are just now getting old enough to drive, although the numbers so far say they're driving later, if at all.
Too funny! The oldest Boomers are now 71. The youngest, b. 1964, are 53. And people are living longer and longer. It's going to be a long time till you're rid of all of us, and then you'll have to come up with someone else to kick around. Or maybe the Mills will be kicking you around! Karma is a b****!
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Old 06-20-2017, 06:39 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
45,983 posts, read 53,496,782 times
Reputation: 15184
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post

I drive a Honda CR-V. It gets around 28 city/34 highway mpg. My husband drives a Kia hybrid. So Embarrassed? Nah! You urbanists never are. Just roll on to the next topic.
he responded to a post where you mentioned buying a pick-up, which are less mileage wise. Though also mentioned renting.

I thought you drove the hybrid.
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Old 06-20-2017, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,297 posts, read 120,779,853 times
Reputation: 35920
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
he responded to a post where you mentioned buying a pick-up, which are less mileage wise. Though also mentioned renting.

I thought you drove the hybrid.
I never mentioned buying any pick-up for myself. And it was very rude of him to play "pretend psychologist" - (Or maybe it's compensating for something...) Real cute, letting it hang there.

No, DH drives the hybrid. He just uses my car for his daily trips to Home Depot, b/c you can haul more stuff in it. So yes, we did buy a car with hauling capacity.
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Old 06-20-2017, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Paranoid State
13,044 posts, read 13,869,992 times
Reputation: 15839
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
How can you move 150 pounds of salt without your own automobile?

1. Use a friend's automobile. Buy them beer or pizza if you feel guilty about it, or return the favor other ways.
2. Rent an automobile or a truck, by the day or by the hour. As mentioned above, Home Depot rents them by the hour.
3. Hire a taxi/uber/lyft.
4. Order online and have it delivered. There is no need to go to the store to pick out the very best bag of salt rock.
5. If you live close enough to the place that sells salt, throw it into a cart/wagon and roll it home.
6. In the near future, ask your robot to get it for you. They'll send for an autonomous delivery vehicle or whatever.
What a royal PIA.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
How often do you move 150 pounds of salt? Once a year?
Probably once/month.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
In the long run, it's not so much about getting people out of their cars as having them not need to get cars in the first place.
Ah, you're falling for the old fallacy that the purpose of a vehicle is to get you from point A to point B.
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Old 06-21-2017, 08:45 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
45,983 posts, read 53,496,782 times
Reputation: 15184
We've been from the thread topic of Gentrification and Pricing out Millennials. Further off topic posts will be deleted
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