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Old 05-24-2008, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
2,806 posts, read 16,369,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phoenix_talons View Post
If by American you mean New York City and inner Los Angeles, then that's quite true. Outside of them, Singapore is nothing like any American city. It's cramped, congested and much too hectic. I know, I've lived there for two decades.
I think the the congestion and pace of life in Singapore is much slower than here in NYC. If you're comparing Singapore to the American 'burbs then I think you're comparing apples and oranges.

I would say Singapore is different from America because of the food culture, singlish, and HDB flats all over the place. THe only thing that NYC and Singapore have in common in my mind is that they are decent sized cities and English is the common language used in both.
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Old 05-25-2008, 07:40 PM
 
6,558 posts, read 12,051,033 times
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Yokohama, Japan reminds me of certain American cities, especially San Francisco with its architecture, location by the bay, a scenic bridge, hills, and a Chinatown. It also reminds me a little bit of Chicago, Boston, and Savannah. Yokohama has the highest number of foreigners in Japan, and many of them are American. It is also close to the Yokosuka Navy Base and NAF Atsugi.

Some parts of Tokyo also feel like you're in an American city, especially Shinjuku with all the modern office buildings and wider streets.
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Old 05-26-2008, 12:47 AM
 
Location: Both coasts
1,574 posts, read 5,117,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEAandATL View Post
Yokohama, Japan reminds me of certain American cities, especially San Francisco with its architecture, location by the bay, a scenic bridge, hills, and a Chinatown.

Some parts of Tokyo also feel like you're in an American city, especially Shinjuku with all the modern office buildings and wider streets.
Just because a city reminds you of another city, doesn't necessarily mean it feels similar.
Just being objective, but many cities around the world have modern office buildings & wide streets- it's not necessarily particularly "American" qualities
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Old 05-26-2008, 01:20 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
2,806 posts, read 16,369,396 times
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I think Ginza in Tokyo is probably the area cloest I found to having an American 'feel' to it. It reminds me a lot of some of the wealthy areas of Manhattan, like the upper east side.
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Old 05-28-2008, 12:06 PM
 
51 posts, read 244,976 times
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I would say Cancun Mexico feels pretty darned American. Kinda like Miami with a Disney land attitude
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Old 06-04-2008, 03:05 PM
 
14 posts, read 71,533 times
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It's funny that you feel like the european cities look like American cities, since Europe has been here longer than most of the US cities, just my 2 cents...

You cannot compare any European city with an US city, b/c there is so much more
history in Europe then the US.
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Old 06-09-2008, 03:07 PM
 
5,462 posts, read 9,636,292 times
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Parts of Bangkok Thailand can seem to have a Western feel to it. You can't turn around without seeing a 7-11, McDonald's, or KFC somewhere. English is pretty common in some districts of BKK, mostly because a lot of English-speaking travelers tend to gather in those areas. A lot of the modern architecture doesn't seem much different than what you might see in the U.S., although various unique-styled Thai temples, as well as the heat and humidity, and cars driving on the left, are reminders that you aren't in the U.S.
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Old 06-13-2008, 09:41 AM
 
26 posts, read 125,310 times
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Default huh?

Why would you 'need' to feel you are in an American style city, when you are not in America? I don't get it.... Isn't that the point of traveling overseas, to see new cultures? I am intrigued as to why you would ask this question. Are you considering traveling overseas, but at the same time wish to have as little a culture shock as possible??? Believe me, breaking your routine and getting a little culture shock now and then is a good thing!!!
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Old 06-13-2008, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Waipahu, HI
50 posts, read 190,585 times
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Default Metro Manila has an American feel

Metro Manila in the Philippines has an American feel. My uncle and I recently traveled there, and he told me that Metro Manila has the stuff America has, e.g., Starbucks, McDonald's, 7-11, Pizza Hut, Jamba Juice, etc. English is also spoken in Metro Manila.

We also traveled to Olongapo City in the province of Zambales, which is a lot less American than Metro Manila. The only American things you'll find in Olongapo City are McDonald's and 7-11.
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Old 06-14-2008, 10:08 AM
 
Location: MN
1,669 posts, read 6,235,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IBadget View Post
Metro Manila in the Philippines has an American feel. My uncle and I recently traveled there, and he told me that Metro Manila has the stuff America has, e.g., Starbucks, McDonald's, 7-11, Pizza Hut, Jamba Juice, etc. English is also spoken in Metro Manila.

We also traveled to Olongapo City in the province of Zambales, which is a lot less American than Metro Manila. The only American things you'll find in Olongapo City are McDonald's and 7-11.
I would say that absolutely nothing about Metro Manila "feels American" beyond a few some of the same chain food places and street signs being in english. Even those food places with the same names have altered menus. McDonalds has spaghetti and fried chicken there along with a few of the same burgers. While many people there can speak English if they want to, I still always hear more Tagalog.

Saudi Arabia has Mcdonalds and some people can speak English, but that doesn't make Riyadh "feel American".
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