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Old 08-19-2017, 10:14 PM
 
1,069 posts, read 727,886 times
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Digging holes in the ground could be the fastest-growing CA industry and I doubt if it would make much of a difference.
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Old 08-20-2017, 01:51 AM
 
11,095 posts, read 10,137,395 times
Reputation: 20486
Quote:
Originally Posted by RosieSD View Post
Yes, all good points.

By the way, I wasn't suggesting we actually divide up the state. I was just wondering how the info graphic would look if, instead of the traditional northern Calif. - Southern Calif. divide, it was divided by Eastern California and Western California.

I spend a lot of time out in the Imperial Valley. Parts of it look like the apocalypse has already come and gone (maybe more than once). But, I've also been surprised to discover some very nice areas in places like Brawley, Imperial (the city), Holtville. Even El Centro has some nicer neighborhoods. So, I wouldn't immediately write off Imperial County as a place that couldn't attract employers looking for a better cost of living for their employees. The same could be said about places like Fresno (nicer than El Centro, for sure), Merced, etc.

Let's just say, there is potential for job development in Eastern California, especially as Western California nears full build out.

The idea isn't all that far fetched. Companies move to Nevada all the time, after all. Of course, Nevada gives tax incentives, so you'd probably have to do something similar in Eastern California to get businesses to move there on a bigger scale.

Anyhow, thanks again for sharing the info graphic. Great addition to the discussion!
I agree. It isn't far fetched, at all. In fact, I think last year (or maybe the year before) there was another thread here on CD discussing the state and splitting it. I recall commenting about that very same thing you are describing. Splitting the entire state in half, leaving the coast in western California and the remaining half as eastern California. Even though we all know there is more money being made in the bay area and LA (and surrounding areas), there is a lot of potential for the eastern part of the state to pick up the slack, if they are enticed to do it. And they could. There is still plenty of available land to develop at a much cheaper price. Still, there would have to be a lot of research on environmental impact, zoning, and costs of infrastructure, schools and additional public costs that come along with developing a particular area. You know what I mean ... If you build it, they will come. And come they will.

I believe that what you propose will actually come to fruition in the future. The western part of the state is running out of space and seemingly only those with mega bucks can afford to live there. The only alternative there is now is to make available other portions of the state with adequate jobs and homes. If the population is becoming unbearable for our state government to handle, perhaps dividing it into smaller sections is a better option now than it was say five years ago. Time will tell.

People want to move here, that's a fact. The state needs revenue and if the current residents don't want to be responsible for shouldering all the expense, we have to expand with more business to accommodate new residents.

Not being from the area you speak of, I wouldn't feel right about making any assumptions but if you see the potential, I'll take your word for it. If it's a viable option, they should go for it.
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Old 08-20-2017, 02:38 AM
 
11,095 posts, read 10,137,395 times
Reputation: 20486
Quote:
Originally Posted by GSR13 View Post
This infographic should be at least somewhat concerning when you consider that only 3 out of the 10 "fastest growing industries" are related to productive economic activity: IT consulting, Residential Building Construction, and Aerospace Engine Parts Manufacturing.
....

To be fair, this is a microcosm of our country as a whole - too many non-productive jobs (i.e., gov't jobs, non-profits, NGO's, other make-work jobs). Too much crap being produced while harboring a high unemployment rate, with AI looming on the horizon. The only way out of this going forward may be to dramatically reduce the workweek and focus on economically productive jobs.
You have a valid point about the lack of productive jobs but whose fault is that? Gosh, I hate that. Putting blame on someone else when we're actually the ones that let it happen but instead of asking whose fault it is, I should ask where did the jobs go? You and I both know the answer to that. Look around your own home. How many things do you own that were actually made here in the U.S.? Not assembled but actually made. Not many, I would guess.

If we want to see more productivity in this state AND in the U.S., we (and I mean all of us) have to make a pledge to buy only those products actually made in the U.S. You laugh, I'm sure. We produce hardly any products here in the U.S. now. It's a shame. And, the products that we buy are junk, imo. But what's worse is we allow ourselves to accept these inferior products from, okay I'll say it, China. Yet, we continue to import their goods, many manufactured by companies that once upon a time were here in the U.S.

Look at some of the crap stuff they've sent us. Tainted dog food, children's toys with lead in them, inferior building supplies i.e. sheet rock in new construction that caused serious health issues, defective steel, such as the bolts used on the bay bridge that caused the bridge to fail just a few year ago, unsafe baby formula, clothing, furniture. I could go on and on but you get the idea. I mean seriously, it's been an ongoing issue and yet we still import from them. If you have an extra hour and 20 minutes, I invite you to watch the following documentary that explains the major problem we have here in this country - which, in turn, trickles down to this state. I hope you'll take the time to view it. It's very enlightening. https://youtu.be/mMlmjXtnIXI

I'm old now. I've got more decades behind me than I have left (if I even have a decade left) and the one great thing about all of it is I've seen what this country was by way of manufacturing and economic growth as opposed to what it is now and you are right. We seem to be relying more on government jobs and non-tangible work; maybe virtual work would be a better word. I come from a generation where six out of ten jobs were automobile related and the automobile was the driving force that kept America going. Now we're all about virtual jobs. When someone becomes a billionaire because they invented a website, I'm flabbergasted and curious. Curious to know what would happen if we were suddenly hit with a major power failure and no one could get online, for weeks or months. How much money is lost? Just some of the nutty things I think about sometimes.
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Old 08-20-2017, 04:48 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
71,682 posts, read 83,258,368 times
Reputation: 41529
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elliott_CA View Post
I wrote the post to throw a little mud back at the California naysayers. For years there have been posts on C-D about how California is going to be the next Greece, we are going bankrupt, how our regulations and increasing minimum wages were going to kill jobs, blah blah.

All that aside, this is the California forum ... if there's any place to do some California cheerleading, it's here.
of course you bring out good points but remember, it isn't just the jobs, but what kind of jobs and what about the overall cost of living? Do these jobs really come with a livable wage which seems to be the later word?
I doubt many do. Also remember, it isn't only the number of jobs, but as some have pointed out the % of unemployment. Yes, Ca is doing ok, still not up to national average or should we say, down to the national average.
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Old 08-20-2017, 12:07 PM
 
Location: West Hollywood, CA
1,367 posts, read 1,743,881 times
Reputation: 1803
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elliott_CA View Post
California adds jobs in July

In July California created 82,600 new jobs. That's 40% of the national total of 209,000.

Wow, you can raise the minimum wage and have high taxes and still create new jobs

And no, Trump had nothing to do with it.
Your lack of logic is hilarious.

1. Companies stay in CA because of the weather and scenery.

2. People move to CA for the weather and scenery.

3. People stay in CA for the weather and scenery even though they spend over half of their paycheck on housing.

4. People stay in CA for the weather and scenery even though this state has the highest number of homeless people in the entire country, littering downtowns across the state.

5. People stay in CA for the weather and scenery even though they are taxed to death.

6. If Texas had nice scenery and good weather, you'd see the same trend, but since Texas is better than CA when it comes to business, it'd be the same trend magnified by 100%.

Also, if you think raising the minimum wage is a good thing, you're an idiot. Period.

Last edited by YoungTraveler2011; 08-20-2017 at 12:17 PM..
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Old 08-20-2017, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Temecula
230 posts, read 461,914 times
Reputation: 304
According to this Forbes article CA is 30th out of 50 for business.
https://www.forbes.com/best-states-for-business/list/
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Old 08-20-2017, 10:15 PM
 
1,069 posts, read 727,886 times
Reputation: 1490
I skimmed the article links at the impression I got is that these are normal seasonal jobs for CA that are being filled.
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Old 08-20-2017, 10:34 PM
 
1,069 posts, read 727,886 times
Reputation: 1490
Quote:
Originally Posted by HereOnMars View Post
You have a valid point about the lack of productive jobs but whose fault is that? Gosh, I hate that. Putting blame on someone else when we're actually the ones that let it happen but instead of asking whose fault it is, I should ask where did the jobs go? You and I both know the answer to that. Look around your own home. How many things do you own that were actually made here in the U.S.? Not assembled but actually made. Not many, I would guess.

If we want to see more productivity in this state AND in the U.S., we (and I mean all of us) have to make a pledge to buy only those products actually made in the U.S. You laugh, I'm sure. We produce hardly any products here in the U.S. now. It's a shame. And, the products that we buy are junk, imo. But what's worse is we allow ourselves to accept these inferior products from, okay I'll say it, China. Yet, we continue to import their goods, many manufactured by companies that once upon a time were here in the U.S.

Look at some of the crap stuff they've sent us. Tainted dog food, children's toys with lead in them, inferior building supplies i.e. sheet rock in new construction that caused serious health issues, defective steel, such as the bolts used on the bay bridge that caused the bridge to fail just a few year ago, unsafe baby formula, clothing, furniture. I could go on and on but you get the idea. I mean seriously, it's been an ongoing issue and yet we still import from them. If you have an extra hour and 20 minutes, I invite you to watch the following documentary that explains the major problem we have here in this country - which, in turn, trickles down to this state. I hope you'll take the time to view it. It's very enlightening. https://youtu.be/mMlmjXtnIXI

I'm old now. I've got more decades behind me than I have left (if I even have a decade left) and the one great thing about all of it is I've seen what this country was by way of manufacturing and economic growth as opposed to what it is now and you are right. We seem to be relying more on government jobs and non-tangible work; maybe virtual work would be a better word. I come from a generation where six out of ten jobs were automobile related and the automobile was the driving force that kept America going. Now we're all about virtual jobs. When someone becomes a billionaire because they invented a website, I'm flabbergasted and curious. Curious to know what would happen if we were suddenly hit with a major power failure and no one could get online, for weeks or months. How much money is lost? Just some of the nutty things I think about sometimes.
Steve Bannon being back at Breitbart should help. He's as anti-China (economically) as you can get. He'll do everything he can do drum up public support for tariffs while persuading people to buy American.

Virtual jobs tend to provide less value than tangible jobs. We're better off as a society doing what we can to cut down on virtual jobs and giving people more time off to spend time with family, pursue hobbies, self-learning, etc.
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Old 08-21-2017, 09:56 AM
 
3,327 posts, read 2,052,878 times
Reputation: 2352
Quote:
Originally Posted by GSR13 View Post
This infographic should be at least somewhat concerning when you consider that only 3 out of the 10 "fastest growing industries" are related to productive economic activity: IT consulting, Residential Building Construction, and Aerospace Engine Parts Manufacturing.

A quick rundown of the other 7:

Commercial Banking - at best this is economic parasitism, at worst this is part of the most evil institution in history - including slavery. See: Federal Reserve, Rothchild family, Soros.

Data Processing - what Google and Facebook does with the info they spy off of you.

Snack Food Production - I love GMOs and processed foods, especially refined sugar. Don't you?

Advertising Agencies - you know, the people responsible for pop-ups and the creepy ads that follow you around the internet.

Breweries - assuming micro-breweries: A phenomenon created by low interest rates, trendiness and millennial vanity. Expect many to go bankrupt in the coming years. Beer is beer, dammit.

Nursing Care, Home Care Providers - what used to be done by family members back in the day when families were strong and intact.


But, this shouldn't be a big surprise when the biggest industries in California outside of Agriculture are Hollywood Crapaganda and zombifiying smartphone apps from Sillygone Valley.


To be fair, this is a microcosm of our country as a whole - too many non-productive jobs (i.e., gov't jobs, non-profits, NGO's, other make-work jobs). Too much crap being produced while harboring a high unemployment rate, with AI looming on the horizon. The only way out of this going forward may be to dramatically reduce the workweek and focus on economically productive jobs.
lets eliminate NFL, NBA, MLB, ESPN, Cable, TV Networks especially FOX, all those that don't produce tangible things like Guns, Cars, Tractors etc am sure Trump wouldn't be that known figure if he didn't star in that crap show
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Old 08-21-2017, 10:32 AM
 
17,432 posts, read 10,504,982 times
Reputation: 8328
Quote:
Originally Posted by GSR13 View Post
I skimmed the article links at the impression I got is that these are normal seasonal jobs for CA that are being filled.
Probably. Lets see how Oct looks.
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