U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-09-2015, 07:57 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,281,099 times
Reputation: 7586

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnatomicflux View Post
^^^^ I bought a quite large, well built, metal bucket at the Dollarama for $3.


EXACT same bucket at Crappy Tire? $14.99.

Same goes for metal plant hangers. Same thing, WILDLY different prices.
Yep, we can buy a lot of stuff really cheap at Dollarama, which would cost 3X more in a regular store.

So far I still don't understand why people shop at Loblaw's instead of Nofrills etc when the products are exactly the same. I buy all my fruits from Chinatown grocery stores, where the same peach that is sold for $3.99 at the Metro is for displayed $1.99, sometimes fresher because the turnover is faster.

Some people just mistake higher prices for better qualities. It is the same reason why some people buy those $4.99 toothpaste with fancy packaging instead of the $1.99 ones with exactly the same function. The manufacturers know many people are not intelligent enough so why not gouge them for more profit? They get the prettier packaging and the company makes more money.

I often hear people complain how expensive it is to live in the big cities nowadays but when I look at how they spend their money (not shopping around, not waiting for deals, jump at the newest and prettiest thing), it is not surprising they live paycheck to paycheck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-09-2015, 08:33 AM
 
Location: London, UK
3,458 posts, read 4,013,882 times
Reputation: 2661
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Yep, we can buy a lot of stuff really cheap at Dollarama, which would cost 3X more in a regular store.

So far I still don't understand why people shop at Loblaw's instead of Nofrills etc when the products are exactly the same. I buy all my fruits from Chinatown grocery stores, where the same peach that is sold for $3.99 at the Metro is for displayed $1.99, sometimes fresher because the turnover is faster.

Some people just mistake higher prices for better qualities. It is the same reason why some people buy those $4.99 toothpaste with fancy packaging instead of the $1.99 ones with exactly the same function. The manufacturers know many people are not intelligent enough so why not gouge them for more profit? They get the prettier packaging and the company makes more money.

I often hear people complain how expensive it is to live in the big cities nowadays but when I look at how they spend their money (not shopping around, not waiting for deals, jump at the newest and prettiest thing), it is not surprising they live paycheck to paycheck.
Big cities tend to reward those who dont mind a little digging and research more than smaller towns, for the simple fact that there are just more options. Yes you pay more when it comes to the big ticket items like housing, but otherwise I find living in a larger city cheaper for everyday goods.

Not to get OT, but your toothpaste example is really one of my major pet peeves. Any Dentist or Hygienist will tell you that any toothpaste with fluoride is fine to use. Paying more for packaging is insane. That is why my tube of AIM from Target for $0.97 works just as fine as any of the others.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2015, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,703 posts, read 8,775,044 times
Reputation: 7319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnatomicflux View Post
^^^^ I bought a quite large, well built, metal bucket at the Dollarama for $3.


EXACT same bucket at Crappy Tire? $14.99.

Same goes for metal plant hangers. Same thing, WILDLY different prices.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQGXa3FiXKM
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2015, 12:09 PM
 
1,691 posts, read 1,658,458 times
Reputation: 1168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnatomicflux View Post
^^^^ I bought a quite large, well built, metal bucket at the Dollarama for $3.


EXACT same bucket at Crappy Tire? $14.99.

Same goes for metal plant hangers. Same thing, WILDLY different prices.
It's crazy. I actually like that they're expanded to become Dollarama+ because the quality of stuff has definitely gone up, and it has allowed them to carry a wider range of products. What I like, and what really lacks in US dollar stores, is the uniformity of products, which is precisely because they source so much of their own stuff rather than just stocking junk cast-offs or close-outs. They should really expand to the US once they have saturated Canada - I have no idea why US chains like Dollar Tree don't try to emulate them.

Quote:
2) you recognize what I've said in the another thread about the urban area density of Toronto and you are right - in Canamerica Toronto's urban area is about as dense as you can get minus NYC.. It is even slightly more dense than L.A's..

Yes BK and Botti i'm just talking about Canamerica - if we compare GTA density to the more dense European, Asian and Latin American cities (even many African) it is grade 4 - just saying this to preclude your inevitable response
In the minds of many, density is signified by tall buildings. In that way, I personally, I find Toronto's density even more impressive than NYC.

Hear me out! In the central core, NYC definitely has the upper hand on Toronto, but once you move to the suburbs, Toronto gains it back. American suburbs are generally very adverse to density and tall buildings, which you don't see in Toronto. NYC has nothing comparable to a Mississauga, which now has 18 buildings over 30 floors. It doesn't even have a Brampton, which is as suburban as you can get, but still counts 20 buildings around/over 20 floors.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2015, 02:53 PM
 
92 posts, read 122,178 times
Reputation: 184
Suburbs exist because we can't all afford either acreage, or HOUSES in the downtown core. Neither can kids be raised comfortably in condos. It's really as simple as that. No need to condemn them.

It's great that people seek different things in a city, or else we'd all want to live in one place!

For the purposes of my points, I have to define "city" as an economic centre that offers the income potential I find encouraging, with the amenities and recreation opportunities that would make living my life and working toward my goals worthwhile. Winter in Toronto IS enough of a downer for me to leave, and the constant overcast is probably even more of a reason. Also, I like sprawl. I like big open roads, big parking lots, and the "park/do/leave" lifestyle as opposed to the urban pedestrian lifestyle. I have no doubt there's a lot of stuff I don't do in Toronto because I hate driving/parking/walking downtown. I'll take on a desert mountain hiking trail any day, though. The sprawling layout of cities like Phoenix and Orlando offer ME a happier, more comfortable life. I can do Scottsdale or Winter Park when I occasionally want a bit of urbanish feel.

For someone for whom urbanity isn't a primary criteria, there are excellent housing values and QoL to be had in more sprawling urban centres.

Last edited by AikenHorses; 09-09-2015 at 03:04 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2015, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
11,265 posts, read 13,177,239 times
Reputation: 13467
Around here, suburbs are where the prices go UP, and in the downtown core, they go DOWN.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2015, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,156,879 times
Reputation: 3738
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardsyzzurphands View Post
Big cities tend to reward those who dont mind a little digging and research more than smaller towns, for the simple fact that there are just more options. Yes you pay more when it comes to the big ticket items like housing, but otherwise I find living in a larger city cheaper for everyday goods.

Not to get OT, but your toothpaste example is really one of my major pet peeves. Any Dentist or Hygienist will tell you that any toothpaste with fluoride is fine to use. Paying more for packaging is insane. That is why my tube of AIM from Target for $0.97 works just as fine as any of the others.
Its funny - i'm not sure during your time here if you checked out some of the flea markets in the burbs... My partner and I recently went to one to buy some Indian jewelry and fabric (totally long story lol).. We went to the flea market on Steeles near airport Road and there was a small farmers market there. I'm telling you, I got two HUGE bags of fruits and vegetable for 12 bucks.. I reckon it would have cost easily double that even at No Frills.. The good thing wasn't just the quantity but quality of the produce - very impressed.. Point being is you have to shop around because man there are some great deals to be found..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2015, 08:15 PM
 
2,566 posts, read 2,184,976 times
Reputation: 1816
Quote:
Originally Posted by AikenHorses View Post
Suburbs exist because we can't all afford either acreage, or HOUSES in the downtown core. Neither can kids be raised comfortably in condos. It's really as simple as that. No need to condemn them.

It's great that people seek different things in a city, or else we'd all want to live in one place!

For the purposes of my points, I have to define "city" as an economic centre that offers the income potential I find encouraging, with the amenities and recreation opportunities that would make living my life and working toward my goals worthwhile. Winter in Toronto IS enough of a downer for me to leave, and the constant overcast is probably even more of a reason. Also, I like sprawl. I like big open roads, big parking lots, and the "park/do/leave" lifestyle as opposed to the urban pedestrian lifestyle. I have no doubt there's a lot of stuff I don't do in Toronto because I hate driving/parking/walking downtown. I'll take on a desert mountain hiking trail any day, though. The sprawling layout of cities like Phoenix and Orlando offer ME a happier, more comfortable life. I can do Scottsdale or Winter Park when I occasionally want a bit of urbanish feel.

For someone for whom urbanity isn't a primary criteria, there are excellent housing values and QoL to be had in more sprawling urban centres.
Joy. Just imagine all the fun you could have with big parking lots and drive thru chains.

You do realize you are on the Toronto city forum of "City Data", not "Suburbia Data".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2015, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,156,879 times
Reputation: 3738
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Yep, we can buy a lot of stuff really cheap at Dollarama, which would cost 3X more in a regular store.

So far I still don't understand why people shop at Loblaw's instead of Nofrills etc when the products are exactly the same. I buy all my fruits from Chinatown grocery stores, where the same peach that is sold for $3.99 at the Metro is for displayed $1.99, sometimes fresher because the turnover is faster.

Some people just mistake higher prices for better qualities. It is the same reason why some people buy those $4.99 toothpaste with fancy packaging instead of the $1.99 ones with exactly the same function. The manufacturers know many people are not intelligent enough so why not gouge them for more profit? They get the prettier packaging and the company makes more money.

I often hear people complain how expensive it is to live in the big cities nowadays but when I look at how they spend their money (not shopping around, not waiting for deals, jump at the newest and prettiest thing), it is not surprising they live paycheck to paycheck.
I very much agree with this post.. Something of a rarity I know lol..

Anyway, I can't fathom why anyone would spend 30 percent or more for an item at one grocery store over another - exactly the same item.. It makes no sense to me at all... The only time I don't shop at No Frills or Food Basics is if the item i'm looking for just isn't there, than I force myself to go to Longo's, Loblaws, Sobeys or Metro otherwise no way..

Last edited by fusion2; 09-09-2015 at 08:25 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2015, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,156,879 times
Reputation: 3738
Quote:
Originally Posted by db108108 View Post

In the minds of many, density is signified by tall buildings. In that way, I personally, I find Toronto's density even more impressive than NYC.

Hear me out! In the central core, NYC definitely has the upper hand on Toronto, but once you move to the suburbs, Toronto gains it back. American suburbs are generally very adverse to density and tall buildings, which you don't see in Toronto. NYC has nothing comparable to a Mississauga, which now has 18 buildings over 30 floors. It doesn't even have a Brampton, which is as suburban as you can get, but still counts 20 buildings around/over 20 floors.
Oh i'm in love

I'm gay and married but it doesn't matter lol..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top