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View Poll Results: Denver vs Minneapolis
Denver 104 55.91%
Minneapolis 82 44.09%
Voters: 186. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-29-2016, 08:18 PM
 
5,807 posts, read 10,350,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WizardOfRadical View Post
Uhh just the taxes made off pot is something to the akin of nearly $80,000,000 dollars in 2014. It brings in more tax revenue than BEER. In July 2015 medical and non medical total revenue was nearly $100,000,000 dollars. That is a pretty fricken big deal. Nevermind the fact that a whole new sector of the economy is no longer under ground, and has helped many otherwise unemployable people find jobs in a niche economy.

Make no mistake, the legalization of pot is HUGE and part of the reason Denver is BOOMING right now. So much so, that California is trying to get their ducks in a row to jump on the bandwagon.
http://www.bizjournals.com/denver/ne...t-a-major.html

I wouldn't be surprised if it does rake in more tax revenue than beer, because of basic supply and demand, pots going to be way more expensive than beer. Even when substances are illegal, they can often being in more revenue than alcohol.

I think the % of people visiting for that specific reason, of the total producion by volume/weight, etc. is a greater reason to say that a place is booming because of X.
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Old 01-29-2016, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
5,377 posts, read 7,671,696 times
Reputation: 4347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
This thread is a lot more vicious than I thought it was going to be. Both cities are pretty similar. White liberal "brogressive" bastions that are overhyped that wish they were Seattle and Portland. Denver has the edge with the beautiful mountains, better climate, and great beer scene. Arguing about which city is more cosmopolitan and diverse is ridiculous...both are pretty similar in that regard.
Literally no city is trying to be Seattle or Portland. Well, maybe Portland is trying to be like Seattle...but there is nothing about Denver or Minneapolis that point to them trying to be Pacific Northwestern.
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Old 01-29-2016, 11:02 PM
 
Location: where the good looking people are
3,438 posts, read 2,251,396 times
Reputation: 2805
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
http://www.bizjournals.com/denver/ne...t-a-major.html

I wouldn't be surprised if it does rake in more tax revenue than beer, because of basic supply and demand, pots going to be way more expensive than beer. Even when substances are illegal, they can often being in more revenue than alcohol.

I think the % of people visiting for that specific reason, of the total producion by volume/weight, etc. is a greater reason to say that a place is booming because of X.

LoL that is just a random survey, come on dude. A you really going to sit here and say what is at or near a billion dollar industry, has not had a significant effect on Denver.

Denver was already economically strong before legal weed, now they are just banking. Ironically they ship most of it from California
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Old 01-29-2016, 11:45 PM
 
5,807 posts, read 10,350,802 times
Reputation: 4311
Quote:
Originally Posted by WizardOfRadical View Post
LoL that is just a random survey, come on dude. A you really going to sit here and say what is at or near a billion dollar industry, has not had a significant effect on Denver.

Denver was already economically strong before legal weed, now they are just banking. Ironically they ship most of it from California
I'm sure it has, I guess what I was suggesting is again, the point of that survey, that the majority of newcomers to Denver and Colorado still come for the same reasons as they would have regardless.

I guess I was never arguing about the economics of the whole thing, I was just focusing more on the types of people who move to Colorado. For the majority of people who are moving, or for those who choose to stay, they could probably care less. So yeah, I was thinking more in terms of the reasons the majority of people moving there, or staying, rather than the economics of the whole thing.
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Old 01-30-2016, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Evergreen, Colorado
621 posts, read 502,008 times
Reputation: 911
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
I'm sorry, I was under the impression from the post that I responded to, was that we were just going to start referencing blogs and stuff we saw on the internet to support any thing that we stated, I must have misunderstood...sorry
I figured that was prescription strength sarcasm, but it still helps to use the rollieyes ().
The high altitude can make one slower on the uptake.
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Old 01-30-2016, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 7,926,991 times
Reputation: 4214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mezter View Post
You realize every city with a cold winter has dead trees during that time (including Minneapolis), right?

If you're referring to the last year, yes there were a lot of dead trees around the city due to a very late snowfall that caused a lot of damage during the spring. However, that's not the normal so I don't get what you're saying
They're not dead, btw.
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Old 01-30-2016, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 7,926,991 times
Reputation: 4214
Quote:
Originally Posted by N610DL View Post
It's certainly a great argument for why DEN is more cosmo than MSP. Recall that people who live in MSP are mostly white people with Scandinavian decent from the metro area originally or WI, IL, ND, SD etc. And those are the types that seem to be culturally accepted up there and thrive (or if you're Mung.)

DEN does have a lot of Midwest people but as you said, lots of east coasters and Californian's. It comes off as more fun and appealing. The pot thing probably has a lot to do with it.
Denver is pretty white.....Latino and white. Not sure what you're bragging about.
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Old 01-30-2016, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 7,926,991 times
Reputation: 4214
Quote:
Originally Posted by WizardOfRadical View Post
Uhh just the taxes made off pot is something to the akin of nearly $80,000,000 dollars in 2014. It brings in more tax revenue than BEER. In July 2015 medical and non medical total revenue was nearly $100,000,000 dollars. That is a pretty fricken big deal. Nevermind the fact that a whole new sector of the economy is no longer under ground, and has helped many otherwise unemployable people find jobs in a niche economy.

Make no mistake, the legalization of pot is HUGE and part of the reason Denver is BOOMING right now. So much so, that California is trying to get their ducks in a row to jump on the bandwagon.
Maybe MN will jump ahead of all of you and legalize heroin....I mean, think of the tax revenues if opium were legalized!!
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Old 02-01-2016, 11:38 AM
 
1,170 posts, read 1,181,301 times
Reputation: 994
Quote:
Originally Posted by N610DL View Post
It's certainly a great argument for why DEN is more cosmo than MSP. Recall that people who live in MSP are mostly white people with Scandinavian decent from the metro area originally or WI, IL, ND, SD etc. And those are the types that seem to be culturally accepted up there and thrive (or if you're Mung.)
First of all, it's Hmong. Next, metro demographics are pretty much pointless as suburbs do not make a city cosmopolitan. If you look at the central cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul as compared to Denver, the core of MPLS and STPL are more diverse than Denver. Yeah, yeah I know Minneapolis and St. Paul are two cities, but they are the core of the metro area and they literally border one another so you can't talk about one while conveniently leaving out the other.

2014 Census Estimates:
MPLS-STPL - 704,825
Denver - 663,862

Land Area:
MPLS-STPL: 107 sq miles
Denver: 153 sq miles

Black
MPLS-STPL - 17.8%
Denver - 9.3%

Asian
MPLS-STPL - 10.9%
Denver - 3.7%

Hispanic
MPLS-STPL - 1%
Denver - 30.8%

Foreign Born
MPLS-STPL - 16.8%
Denver - 17%
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Old 02-01-2016, 06:56 PM
 
Location: where the good looking people are
3,438 posts, read 2,251,396 times
Reputation: 2805
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Maybe MN will jump ahead of all of you and legalize heroin....I mean, think of the tax revenues if opium were legalized!!
Is this midwestern guy really comparing weed to opium?

If this is a prevailing attitude in the midwest, add this as yet another reason to choose Denver!
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