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Old 03-06-2019, 06:30 AM
 
157 posts, read 70,673 times
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Colleges have offered remedial courses for students who need them for many years. This is nothing new. It's also a big money maker.

 
Old 03-06-2019, 08:53 AM
 
12,775 posts, read 6,675,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildflower_FL View Post
If you think what he was teaching is remedial, you probably don't want to take a look at what the math requirements are for elementary education majors at a lot of colleges. In the school district I live in, pretty much all of the advance math students were taught math outside of the classroom. Private math supplement is very common here because teachers with K-8th certifications often are extremely weak in math.

This really depends on your zip code. In an affluent blue state, a middle school math/science teacher can actually teach math and science. You get what you pay for. An elementary school teacher is expected to be capable of teaching arithmetic.
 
Old 03-06-2019, 08:55 AM
 
12,775 posts, read 6,675,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoesJava View Post
Colleges have offered remedial courses for students who need them for many years. This is nothing new. It's also a big money maker.

Not a real college. You wouldn't get admitted to anywhere selective if you couldn't do High School math or read/write at High School level.
 
Old 03-06-2019, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
8,184 posts, read 2,618,910 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
Not a real college. You wouldn't get admitted to anywhere selective if you couldn't do High School math or read/write at High School level.

Universities have always been looking to increase their enrollment, even those that select only a few of the many who apply. That's why bonehead math and bonehead English are offered (or required) for some of those they admit-----athletes, for example. Some extremely talented new students in some fields, may need help getting started in math and English.
 
Old 03-06-2019, 10:55 AM
 
Location: USA
6,213 posts, read 5,176,738 times
Reputation: 10607
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
Universities have always been looking to increase their enrollment, even those that select only a few of the many who apply. That's why bonehead math and bonehead English are offered (or required) for some of those they admit-----athletes, for example. Some extremely talented new students in some fields, may need help getting started in math and English.


For the degrees that actually lead to very high paid jobs, such as computer science or engineering they do not dumb down the courses.
 
Old 03-06-2019, 01:04 PM
 
1,587 posts, read 633,838 times
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Slightly off topic, but college is supposed to be higher education, but so many immigrants whose English sucks can graduate. How the heck do they understand what professors are saying or what they're reading in their textbooks since the vocabulary in college is more advanced, i.e. SAT words? Even if they learned English in their home country, how much do they remember the SAT type words if they never have a chance to use it in their home country? Especially since no one speaks that way.

That's my gripe about American colleges, that immigrants whose English level is no where near a native's can still graduate college. That's college being dumbed down college to me.
 
Old 03-06-2019, 01:12 PM
 
789 posts, read 151,526 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barneyg View Post
Page 62 of the document linked in the post you replied to.

Requirements for graduation:

2. Successfully complete a minimum of 120 semester hours of non-repeat courses (exclusive of courses numbered below 100.)
Ah. Thanks.
 
Old 03-06-2019, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,039 posts, read 100,903,502 times
Reputation: 32455
Quote:
Originally Posted by parentologist View Post
https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...=.9c7ac8bcfd13

Warning - Washington Post has a paywall. You get the first few articles free.

In this feel good story, a man who is a senior at Morehouse college (a historically black college in Atlanta, GA) had to bring his baby to class with him. The professor offered to hold the baby while he taught, so that the student could take notes. What a sweet and supportive prof!

But the real issue here is that the material being taught is high school algebra, even first year of algebra. This is material that, in my district, the most advanced students take in 7th grade, the moderately advanced students take in 8th grade, and the majority of students take in 9th grade. This is essentially remedial math, that should not be offered for college credit, but just as remedial preparation for students who enter college unprepared for college level math, that is taken for no credit. And this is a senior taking what is essentially remedial math? I don't care if you call it "College" algebra. It's still remedial math, whether you call it "High School" or "College".
If I say what I'm thinking, I'll probably get an infraction,so I'll say "so what" to the bold. That's pretty much how it is in my district too. So the guy is maybe taking a remedial math course. Big deal. He went to class, with the baby. That's the big deal!
 
Old 03-06-2019, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
22,309 posts, read 16,469,919 times
Reputation: 25849
To me, the fact that the student had the baby at the college is much more telling.
 
Old 03-06-2019, 02:32 PM
Status: "Fight On" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,456 posts, read 26,190,447 times
Reputation: 19855
Im OK with wherever this dad is. He is moving forward. I will agree with the premise that the math taught is something that my kids had in the 7th and 8th grade.

I will add that in order to move forward within a math curriculum or progress thru math requirements sometimes a student will need to take classes that assist them towards the ultimate goal of completing an education. This is a 26 year old man. It could be that he has decided to earn a degree and has not been involved with the educational process for some time. It is possible that when he was a young man he did not see the value of an education. I am guessing he wants a better life for his young family. Probably doesn't want to work two jobs and go to school for the remainder of his life.
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