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Old 07-07-2010, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Morgantown, WV
1,000 posts, read 1,597,814 times
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My New Yawk Accent

Dog = Dawg
Water = Wawter
Cofee = Cawfee
Walk = Wawk
Talk = Tawk
Stalk= Stock
New Jersey : New Joizey
New York : New Yawk
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Old 07-07-2010, 08:00 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,136,179 times
Reputation: 1407
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlotteNCRepublican View Post
My New Yawk Accent

Dog = Dawg
Water = Wawter
Cofee = Cawfee
Walk = Wawk
Talk = Tawk
Stalk= Stock
New Jersey : New Joizey
New York : New Yawk
the first 5 are NOLA too.


Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
Westbank, I've heard a New Orleans accent sounds like a New York accent, and not like a Southern accent. Is this true?
For the most part. New Orleans has a handful of accents, but all of them sound more Northeastern or Caribbean than Southern.

Last edited by WestbankNOLA; 07-07-2010 at 08:12 PM..
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Old 07-07-2010, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
492 posts, read 862,872 times
Reputation: 398
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
the first 5 are NOLA too.




For the most part. New Orleans has a handful of accents, but all of them sound more Northeastern or Caribbean than Southern.

Is there a difference in the way whites and blacks from New Orleans talk?, and this is really a serious question because I know a few blacks from NO and New York/Brooklyn, and they sound nothing, and I mean NOTHING alike. The people I know from NO still have a southerness to them, especially the females from NO. And the ones from Brooklyn have real heavy NY accents. (The girls I know from Brooklyn sound like dudes) But i dont know any white people from said areas so Im guessing maybe they are the ones who sound similar.

(sorry for the racial terms but it is really a serious question)
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Old 07-07-2010, 08:45 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,136,179 times
Reputation: 1407
Quote:
Originally Posted by VA7cities View Post
Is there a difference in the way whites and blacks from New Orleans talk?, and this is really a serious question because I know a few blacks from NO and New York/Brooklyn, and they sound nothing, and I mean NOTHING alike. The people I know from NO still have a southerness to them, especially the females from NO. And the ones from Brooklyn have real heavy NY accents. (The girls I know from Brooklyn sound like dudes) But i dont know any white people from said areas so Im guessing maybe they are the ones who sound similar.

(sorry for the racial terms but it is really a serious question)
The NOLA accents are mixed up across racial lines, but you can say that the Whites are more likely to sound similar to someone from Brooklyn and a good number of blacks have it as well. They rest still don't sound southern. There is the occasional southern influenced accent but it's far and in between.
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Old 07-07-2010, 09:04 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
2,257 posts, read 6,972,724 times
Reputation: 4061
You guys will find this site very interesting:

Dialect Survey Results

It presents the results of a dialect survey across the US, including many of the pronunciation variants already mentioned here.

Here are some typical regional pronunciations you might hear in eastern New England, although most are becoming increasingly rare:

aunt = ahnt
horse = hoss
morning = monning
north = noth
warm = wom
yours = yoz
corner = conna
forty = foddy
short = shot
quarter = quodda
half = hahf
laugh = lahf
last = lahst
ask = ahsk
can't = cahnt
bathroom = bahthroom
scallops = scahllops
floor = flo-ah
door = do-ah
store = sto-ah
four = fo-ah
there = they-ah
square = squay-ah
air = ay-ah
careful = cafful
idea = idear
soda = soder
pizza = pizzer
area = arear
drawing = drawring
I saw it = I sawr it
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Old 07-07-2010, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
492 posts, read 862,872 times
Reputation: 398
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
The NOLA accents are mixed up across racial lines, but you can say that the Whites are more likely to sound similar to someone from Brooklyn and a good number of blacks have it as well. They rest still don't sound southern. There is the occasional southern influenced accent but it's far and in between.

Are you familiar with Toya from the Tiny and Toya show that comes on?.... Because many of the males/females I know from NO sound like her. It sounds southern to me. But not Mississippi, Alabama southern, but that NO southern. Just my opinion though.
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Old 07-07-2010, 09:14 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,136,179 times
Reputation: 1407
Quote:
Originally Posted by VA7cities View Post
Are you familiar with Toya from the Tiny and Toya show that comes on?.... Because many of the males/females I know from NO sound like her. It sounds southern to me. But not Mississippi, Alabama southern, but that NO southern. Just my opinion though.
Toya waters her accent down a lot on television too. But you like you said it's not your typical southern. Notice whenever they were in New Orleans when anybody besides Toya spoke they used subtitles.
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Old 07-07-2010, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
492 posts, read 862,872 times
Reputation: 398
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
Toya waters her accent down a lot on television too. But you like you said it's not your typical southern. Notice whenever they were in New Orleans when anybody besides Toya spoke they used subtitles.
LOL yeah....I love the New Orleans accent
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Old 07-07-2010, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,972 posts, read 12,490,008 times
Reputation: 8719
Quote:
Originally Posted by Verseau View Post
You guys will find this site very interesting:

Dialect Survey Results

It presents the results of a dialect survey across the US, including many of the pronunciation variants already mentioned here.

Here are some typical regional pronunciations you might hear in eastern New England, although most are becoming increasingly rare:

aunt = ahnt
horse = hoss
morning = monning
north = noth
warm = wom
yours = yoz
corner = conna
forty = foddy
short = shot
quarter = quodda
half = hahf
laugh = lahf
last = lahst
ask = ahsk
can't = cahnt
bathroom = bahthroom
scallops = scahllops
floor = flo-ah
door = do-ah
store = sto-ah
four = fo-ah
there = they-ah
square = squay-ah
air = ay-ah
careful = cafful
idea = idear
soda = soder
pizza = pizzer
area = arear
drawing = drawring
I saw it = I sawr it

The first time I ever realized I spoke with a Mass accent was when I was 17 and in Canada. I remember them all laughing at us when we said water. All these years later and living away from Mass, I still have the accent but it has faded so much. Its nice to see these words and those pronunciations so familiar to me. They bring back alot of memories not just of the words but of the people that spoke them.
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Old 07-07-2010, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,465,981 times
Reputation: 10927
Quote:
Originally Posted by Verseau View Post
You guys will find this site very interesting:

Dialect Survey Results

It presents the results of a dialect survey across the US, including many of the pronunciation variants already mentioned here.

Here are some typical regional pronunciations you might hear in eastern New England, although most are becoming increasingly rare:

aunt = ahnt
horse = hoss
morning = monning
north = noth
warm = wom
yours = yoz
corner = conna
forty = foddy
short = shot
quarter = quodda
half = hahf
laugh = lahf
last = lahst
ask = ahsk
can't = cahnt
bathroom = bahthroom
scallops = scahllops
floor = flo-ah
door = do-ah
store = sto-ah
four = fo-ah
there = they-ah
square = squay-ah
air = ay-ah
careful = cafful
idea = idear
soda = soder
pizza = pizzer
area = arear
drawing = drawring
I saw it = I sawr it

Not sure they are so rare. I was in fall river Mass a few years back and I had a tough time understanding the local accent. I had to ask people to repeat themselves. It is the thickest accent ive ever heard here in the US. (ive been to 46 states). I am from Michigan, and they thought my midwest accent was very strong as well, but at least they could understand me. Are the accents of New England alive and well? youbetcha they are.
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