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Old 11-30-2014, 05:01 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,155,936 times
Reputation: 4349

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Ok, but does that not go for EVERY stereotype about everywhere? That people can educate themselves?

Answer - it does. The South is not special in this regard. The Midwest gets pretty beaten up too, and people say cruel things about the NE. Even the West.

I'm not so sure the South gets it the worst. I think it depends on your perspective. I think my state may be the most hated... As a region, the South gets it bad but like I said, so does the Midwest. Americans in general love making fun of Canada. It works all ways. There's not use trying to decide who gets it worst or even explaining the reasoning behind stereotypes - it's just hard to change them. The end, really. I don't even think it's worth talking about. There will always be people everywhere who need to get out more and learn some things. You can't force people to visit all areas and rid them of the stereotypes they believe in. Also keep in mind that the internet always bashes the worst. You will probably hear worst things here on CD than IRL. This type of stuff is always worse on the internet. It's not as if northerners IRL make it their mission to bash the South daily. That's not even on most people's minds.
All regions take their beatings, but the media shine and pop culture influence that the northeast has more than makes up for it. "New Yorkers are rude" is hardly an insult. Most people largely view the northeast and the west as highly educated, cultured, and important regions. Southerners are usually made out to be the complete opposite of all that. The south is made out to be "the bad part" of the nation. The Midwest is a very close second, but it's saved by cities like Chicago and Minneapolis. Even Detroit has drastically improved its image.

New Jersey the most hated? Maybe by New Yorkers. I can't imagine any other state having a dog in that fight.

 
Old 11-30-2014, 05:07 PM
 
12,636 posts, read 10,487,316 times
Reputation: 17422
Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
All regions take their beatings, but the media shine and pop culture influence that the northeast has more than makes up for it. "New Yorkers are rude" is hardly an insult. Most people largely view the northeast and the west as highly educated, cultured, and important regions. Southerners are usually made out to be the complete opposite of all that. The south is made out to be "the bad part" of the nation. The Midwest is a very close second, but it's saved by cities like Chicago and Minneapolis. Even Detroit has drastically improved its image.

New Jersey the most hated? Maybe by New Yorkers. I can't imagine any other state having a dog in that fight.
Haha, seriously about NJ? You're lying if you say you think that! Ever heard of Jersey Shore? Real Housewives? Even the Soprano's gave us a negative connotation. Armpit of America, how about that? Fist pumping? Fake tan so we're orange? Guido? Industrial, smelly, concrete? All nationally known stereotypes. But this isn't about NJ, I just mentioned it to show that many places get it bad with stereotypes.

I think people should be upset by stereotypes about their region/state/whatever, I totally get it. But as much as we would all like to change them... we can't. It's impossible to make everyone understand that what they believe is not always true and is a poor representation of an area. You can't make people travel to the South so you can prove them wrong. It's not easy to change a stereotype. You can try to educate people but not everyone is going to listen. That's why I think is useless to even talk about. Just my opinion.

Also, the Northeast does not influence pop culture single-handedly. Like other have said, how about Hollywood? Not sure why everyone is blaming the NE for Southern stereotypes. That itself is a stereotype, don't you think?
 
Old 11-30-2014, 05:18 PM
 
1,833 posts, read 1,810,787 times
Reputation: 921
Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
All regions take their beatings, but the media shine and pop culture influence that the northeast has more than makes up for it. "New Yorkers are rude" is hardly an insult. Most people largely view the northeast and the west as highly educated, cultured, and important regions. Southerners are usually made out to be the complete opposite of all that. The south is made out to be "the bad part" of the nation. The Midwest is a very close second, but it's saved by cities like Chicago and Minneapolis. Even Detroit has drastically improved its image.

New Jersey the most hated? Maybe by New Yorkers. I can't imagine any other state having a dog in that fight.
Have you ever heard of the term dirty jersey?
 
Old 11-30-2014, 05:19 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,155,936 times
Reputation: 4349
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Haha, seriously about NJ? You're lying if you say you think that! Ever heard of Jersey Shore? Real Housewives? Even the Soprano's gave us a negative connotation. Armpit of America, how about that? Fist pumping? Fake tan so we're orange? Guido? Industrial, smelly, concrete? All nationally known stereotypes. But this isn't about NJ, I just mentioned it to show that many places get it bad with stereotypes.
I've heard the "Armpit of America" title attributed to numerous regions of the country, including my own home region. I'm not saying New Jersey has a squeaky clean image, but "most hated" is an exaggeration. Where I'm from most people probably couldn't tell you anything about NJ, good or bad.

Quote:
I think people should be upset by stereotypes about their region/state/whatever, I totally get it. But as much as we would all like to change them... we can't. It's impossible to make everyone understand that what they believe is not always true and is a poor representation of an area. You can't make people travel to the South so you can prove them wrong. It's not easy to change a stereotype. You can try to educate people but not everyone is going to listen. That's why I think is useless to even talk about. Just my opinion.
All the topics here are pretty useless though, you have to admit.

Quote:
Also, the Northeast does not influence pop culture single-handedly. Like other have said, how about Hollywood? Not sure why everyone is blaming the NE for Southern stereotypes. That itself is a stereotype, don't you think?
True the west is a big part of it too. I don't meant to place sole blame on the north.
 
Old 11-30-2014, 05:20 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,155,936 times
Reputation: 4349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deluusions View Post
Have you ever heard of the term dirty jersey?
Can't say I have.
 
Old 11-30-2014, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Sale Creek, TN
3,968 posts, read 3,632,236 times
Reputation: 4252
Stereotypical questions asked about the South.
Are you married to your brother/sister?
Do you have all your teeth?
How big is your trailer?
 
Old 11-30-2014, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,749,988 times
Reputation: 2258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deluusions View Post
Everyone forgets how Hollywood plays a big part in this. Everyone is blaming the northerners but forgetting how Hollywood is the one putting ignorant stereotypical rednecks on TV. Look at Honey BooBoo for example.
Finally, someone who sees the forest for the trees.

The media (obviously that includes Hollywood) are the #1 generators and perpetuators of stereotypes, whether it's the "poor, uneducated, obese, racist" South, the "rude, fast-talking, uptight, provincial" Northeast, the "folksy, cornfed, all-American, whitebread" Midwest, the "laid-back, sunny, flaky, liberal" West coast, or the "aloof, introverted, insular, nerdy" Pacific Northwest.

So, when will the stereotypes finally start to die out? When people quit looking to the media to shape their views of other people, places, and things. Maybe if people shut off the TV, got up off their asses, and actually visited some of these places outside of their little comfort zone, they could see things for what they really are and learn to become a bit more objective.

Sure, some of the stereotypes will apply... no matter which region: North, South, East, West, or Central... but not in such a simple, general kind of way. Our nation's regions are far more multi-faceted and nuanced than most people realize. Get out and see the nation... ALL of it, even the places that you're hesitant to visit. You might be surprised.
 
Old 11-30-2014, 11:43 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 2,046,833 times
Reputation: 2543
The stereotyping goes both ways.

I never felt welcomed in the South (I'm from the Northeast, originally) and am never comfortable there. For what it's worth, I've lived in FL, GA, and TX and have traveled the South extensively.

While living and traveling in the South, I experienced a lot of hurtful comments. It's hard to explain because nothing is outright, and everything seems to have a second meaning. It's not an issue of being a loud, obnoxious "Yankee," either, as others have asserted -- I don't talk much without being addressed first, and definitely don't talk about my native state of RI or home state of CA unless asked.

Problem is, I am asked a lot about "up there," usually in the form of baited questions to set me up for some cutting remark or veiled insult. Another common occurrence, especially in a group setting, is being asked a question and then being cut off as I begin to reply. Lots of backhanded compliments and uncomfortable comments that are said in a polite way. Using the term "Yankee" in a derogatory manner is very common. In the Northeast and on the West Coast, I've never heard the word "Yankee" used outside of reference to the baseball team, and I still haven't gotten used to the term.

This weird stuff happens with a lot of people I meet in the South -- neighbors, colleagues, mutual friends, even service providers. To say that most people in the South aren't still fighting the Civil War is an understatement and don't stereotype people from Northern states, ignorant. My own personal experiences are a testament to that.

Truth be told, I think a lot of Northerners throw around Southern stereotypes as part of a defense mechanism, so to speak, since there's so much vocal anti-North / anti-Yankee sentiment in the South. As someone who has lived on both sides of the fence, I can assure you that few, if any, people up North pay the South any mind, despite the reverse being untrue.

Last edited by 8to32characters; 12-01-2014 at 12:07 AM..
 
Old 12-01-2014, 08:50 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,155,936 times
Reputation: 4349
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8to32characters View Post
The stereotyping goes both ways.

I never felt welcomed in the South (I'm from the Northeast, originally) and am never comfortable there. For what it's worth, I've lived in FL, GA, and TX and have traveled the South extensively.

While living and traveling in the South, I experienced a lot of hurtful comments. It's hard to explain because nothing is outright, and everything seems to have a second meaning. It's not an issue of being a loud, obnoxious "Yankee," either, as others have asserted -- I don't talk much without being addressed first, and definitely don't talk about my native state of RI or home state of CA unless asked.

Problem is, I am asked a lot about "up there," usually in the form of baited questions to set me up for some cutting remark or veiled insult. Another common occurrence, especially in a group setting, is being asked a question and then being cut off as I begin to reply. Lots of backhanded compliments and uncomfortable comments that are said in a polite way. Using the term "Yankee" in a derogatory manner is very common. In the Northeast and on the West Coast, I've never heard the word "Yankee" used outside of reference to the baseball team, and I still haven't gotten used to the term.

This weird stuff happens with a lot of people I meet in the South -- neighbors, colleagues, mutual friends, even service providers. To say that most people in the South aren't still fighting the Civil War is an understatement and don't stereotype people from Northern states, ignorant. My own personal experiences are a testament to that.

Truth be told, I think a lot of Northerners throw around Southern stereotypes as part of a defense mechanism, so to speak, since there's so much vocal anti-North / anti-Yankee sentiment in the South. As someone who has lived on both sides of the fence, I can assure you that few, if any, people up North pay the South any mind, despite the reverse being untrue.
Completely relative. I guarantee you that somewhere there is a southerner who would claim to have the same experience up north that you claim to have had down south. So, no, you can't assure any of us of anything.
 
Old 12-01-2014, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,311,571 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deluusions View Post
Have you ever heard of the term dirty jersey?
I think he's right. NJ isn't a very hated state here in the Midwest, though I can't speak for all the other 40-something states. In fact, I'm not sure what's so unappealing about NJ to begin with, other than the fact that the bulk of industrial NYC is set in NJ, and it's the first thing you notice when leaving NY for NJ. The rest of the state (for the most part) seems quite lovely to me.

I hate Wisconsin and Indiana, personally (though "hate" is a very strong word and I wouldn't use it normally). I hate WI because I'm a fan of MN sports and naturally it's easy to hate the border rival Cheeseheads. However, WI is actually a very nice place and there's much more I like about it than hate about it. If Minneapolis (my birthplace and home away from home) was in Wisconsin, I know I wouldn't "hate" WI. Indiana, on the other hand, just rubs me wrong. It seems like a very conservative, "redneck", backwards place that somehow lies within the same region I live in (the Midwest). I really only have driven through IN but that in and of itself is a reason to hate the state (insane drivers, boring topography for much of the state). I'm pretty sure IN has a lot of redeeming qualities about it though, enough for me to change my mind about it fairly quickly.
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