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Old 06-26-2009, 10:34 PM
 
Location: St Paul, MN - NJ's Gold Coast
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The Middle East
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Old 06-26-2009, 11:20 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
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MN, WI, IL, IN, MI, OH in my travels do not have much in common with the places in the great plains like Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota...

I say just call those the Great Lakes Region, and then have the Great Plains region..

I think the plains is what most knowledgeable people actually associate with "fly over" areas... not so much with the other states...there is plenty to see there with many unique cities, in the plains like Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota... not so much.
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Old 06-27-2009, 01:10 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
MN, WI, IL, IN, MI, OH in my travels do not have much in common with the places in the great plains like Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota...

I say just call those the Great Lakes Region, and then have the Great Plains region..

I think the plains is what most knowledgeable people actually associate with "fly over" areas... not so much with the other states...there is plenty to see there with many unique cities, in the plains like Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota... not so much.
Didn't see one mention of Missouri in here. Missouri is a Midwestern state by all means, but it has more cultural influences from other regions than other Midwestern states do. I think that the only difference between the Great Plains states and the Great Lakes states is the topography. Iowa is definitely not a Great Plains state, primarily because it is prime farmland and doesn't require irrigation like the Great Plains states. Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota have more similarities to each other than differences. The Midwest is a good name for this region in my opinion. If not, than the North Central region.
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Old 06-27-2009, 10:06 AM
 
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Missouri is not a plains state.
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Old 06-27-2009, 10:43 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Originally Posted by northbound74 View Post
Missouri is not a plains state.
I never said that Missouri was a plains state! I know 50% of it is covered by the Ozarks but outside of there it lies within the Interior Plains and the extreme Southeastern part of it is in the Mississippi Delta. Kansas City and most of St. Louis lie within either flat or moderately rolling plains and forest. At any rate, my definition of a plains state is one within the Great Plains, which Missouri is clearly not. When I was talking about similarities, I was discussing culture, dialect, crops grown, weather...and especially comparison between the major cities in each of these states. Topography is not the most accurate way to define a region anyway, as in every region of the United States there is considerable variation in it...not to mention culture doesn't always coincide with it either.

Last edited by ajf131; 06-27-2009 at 10:55 AM..
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Old 06-27-2009, 11:35 AM
 
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^I wasn't responding to your post, just earlier ones that kept saying that Missouri is a plains state.
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Old 06-27-2009, 12:08 PM
 
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I thought the Great lake states sounded good, but New York and Pennsylvania also border the lakes and are certainly not midwestern.
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Old 06-27-2009, 02:24 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Originally Posted by northbound74 View Post
^I wasn't responding to your post, just earlier ones that kept saying that Missouri is a plains state.
sorry
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Old 06-27-2009, 02:40 PM
 
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Cornfieldia!
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Old 06-27-2009, 02:52 PM
 
2,106 posts, read 6,355,004 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Didn't see one mention of Missouri in here. Missouri is a Midwestern state by all means, but it has more cultural influences from other regions than other Midwestern states do. I think that the only difference between the Great Plains states and the Great Lakes states is the topography. Iowa is definitely not a Great Plains state, primarily because it is prime farmland and doesn't require irrigation like the Great Plains states. Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota have more similarities to each other than differences. The Midwest is a good name for this region in my opinion. If not, than the North Central region.
I don't find much similarities between Ohio and Indiana, despite them bordering each other. Heck, Ohio is different then most of the Midwest other than south Michigan, Northern Illinois, and the Milwaukee region. Other than that, I can't agree that these areas show more similarities then differences.

I actually find Northeast Ohio more of a northeastern city (not Midwest), Columbus being midwest, and Cincinnati being similar to St. Louis with mixed influences. I mean, Ohio has 6 cities with over 200,000 and they all differ so much.. that alone tells you how hard it is to compare all the midwest to each other. It's a silly category to be honest.
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