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Old 10-28-2009, 10:07 PM
 
39 posts, read 192,815 times
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For starters, I grew up in East Texas and Omaha, NE. Recently (2 years ago) headed west to Oregon and now reside in Tucson, AZ. Basically, I always disliked living in the middle part of the country. The coasts always seemed more attractive (to me). Turns out (aesthetically, to me) they are, but the economies suck... i.e. high unemployment rates in OR. All these lame "Best places..." lists seem to point to really bland, cookie cutter, and generally uninteresting places to live. Any thoughts on this? Any places that are beautiful and have strong economies? ** More specifically... good places to raise a family? **

BTW I'm aware this is highly subjective, but I would love some opinions on this...

Last edited by InLimbo520; 10-28-2009 at 10:52 PM.. Reason: rephrasing my question...
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Old 10-28-2009, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Alaska & Florida
1,629 posts, read 4,860,829 times
Reputation: 828
I actually disagree...
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Old 10-28-2009, 10:22 PM
 
Location: IN
20,864 posts, read 35,998,811 times
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Large coastal metros have very diversified economies. If you have the requisite skills that are in demand in certain fields there are position openings.
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Old 10-28-2009, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,525 posts, read 7,479,648 times
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Up until this lousy recession/depression east tennessee had a good economy and that is a beautiful place.
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Old 10-28-2009, 11:02 PM
 
3,326 posts, read 7,757,425 times
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Many scenic places are boom/bust type of places for starters. They're wildly popular, like the pretty cheerleader, but then people realize that looks aren't everything.
Politics often ruin such places.
Out on the plains, the politics are more of the moderate, steady-as-she-goes variety, and they're also very pro-business.
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Old 10-28-2009, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
354 posts, read 1,090,886 times
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Beautiful places have bad economies because they are beautiful places. If the economy would support them everyone would relocate there and ruin it.
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Old 10-28-2009, 11:24 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,991,559 times
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Some truth in that.

In some cases what makes a place "beautiful" does not make it particularly livable. There are many beautiful mountainous places that have bad soil or can't support a large population. This is less true now that it's easier to ship food long distances, but the past can still have an effect on the present.

Also many of the bland looking places tend to be stable more than anything. So you don't get the lows of the current recession, but you also don't get quite the same highs either. I think Gateway or one of those is headquartered in South Dakota, but I don't think South Dakota became a tech-center. At least not the way parts of the Pacific Coast did.
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Old 10-28-2009, 11:28 PM
 
39 posts, read 192,815 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Up until this lousy recession/depression east tennessee had a good economy and that is a beautiful place.
Ive never really seen much of the east coast mountains... any favorite areas? I hear Asheville, NC is nice. But im beginning to think this economy is a crapshoot no matter where you go...

Turns out, as my username implies, things are InLimbo right now for us. Once you pick up and leave your roots its hard to begin again in a new place and while unemployed.
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Old 10-29-2009, 12:23 AM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,592,757 times
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sf la seattle san diego denver ... all horrible economies.
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Old 10-29-2009, 12:35 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington
2,317 posts, read 6,893,265 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
sf la seattle san diego denver ... all horrible economies.
Denver isn't so bad, comparatively.

You have to add Portland to that. Well... the whole West Coast actually. Scenic with a terrible economy. The only part that I know that's kind of alright is Benton County in Oregon which is basically a little unscenic slice of Iowa set down in the middle of Oregon. It's got strong education and healthcare industries (college town of Corvallis) bolstering its economy.
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