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Old 08-07-2010, 09:04 AM
 
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It could be that you are the top candidate and they need to gauge how much time they have until they make an offer.

My friend who recently left the company I work at was in heavy interviewing with another company that she preferred. She received an offer from a company she had interviewed at 6 months prior so she mentioned that to the HR department at the company she preferred. They made an offer within a couple days.
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Old 08-07-2010, 09:09 AM
 
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Even if OP is there number one choice, if he turns down the offer they will go with nuumber two...very simple.

It is none of their business.

And kind of dumb question anyway. Who puts all their eggs in one basket?

Most likely OP is searching for other positions or in the process of a securing an interview somewhere else.
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Old 08-07-2010, 09:12 AM
 
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Default Time and opportunity...

Quote:
Originally Posted by lovetheduns View Post
It could be that you are the top candidate and they need to gauge how much time they have until they make an offer.

My friend who recently left the company I work at was in heavy interviewing with another company that she preferred. She received an offer from a company she had interviewed at 6 months prior so she mentioned that to the HR department at the company she preferred. They made an offer within a couple days.
Another good answer... especially since she's already had more than one interview.

However, they could also be considering how much they have to pay them... other opportunities would be a factor they would consider.
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Old 08-07-2010, 11:51 AM
 
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Default "Anything in the Pipeline"

There are several reasons for asking if a candidate has "anything in the pipeline." A recruiter could be asking to determine how active the candidate has been and whether the candidate is close to getting an offer from another firm. Another reason is that it prequalifies a candidate. If a candidate has secured an interview with company x, and company x is a player in the industry, then the recruiter knows the candidate is someone who can be presented with some comfort. The biggest reason, however, is for the benefit of the recruiter. Often multiple recruiters work on the same job leads. If a candidate reveals that he has been looked at for a position at a certain firm, the recruiter my want to solicit that firm for business. Companies that use one recruiter will use more than one recruiter. The company benefits by getting a larger pool of qualified candidates. The whole thing gets to be one big feeding frenzy. If you have ever noticed what appears to be the same position posted by multiple recruiting firms, you are most likely correct.
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Old 08-07-2010, 02:56 PM
 
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This is a person that works for the specific company.... not a "general" recruiter.
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Old 08-07-2010, 02:58 PM
 
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A) They are subtly letting you know that you don't have a good chance of getting this job and you should be pursuing other opportunities.

B) they plan on stringing you along and dragging out this hiring process but they don't want to push you so far that you walk away.

C) they want to use your connections to sell their services, a common practice among recruiting/staffing agencies. It saves them the work of cold calling businesses, peddling their services. You give them 'warm' contacts--places that are interviewing are more likely to be receptive to their sales pitch.

I would respond as mentioned above, "why do you ask?". If they continue to push you to reveal your job search contacts, respond with something along the lines of "I am pursuing other leads but I'm not at liberty to discuss any details with you." And continue to refuse to offer details if they keep pushing.

Last edited by kodaka; 08-07-2010 at 03:06 PM..
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Old 08-07-2010, 04:52 PM
 
4,541 posts, read 13,132,832 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kodaka View Post
A) They are subtly letting you know that you don't have a good chance of getting this job and you should be pursuing other opportunities.

B) they plan on stringing you along and dragging out this hiring process but they don't want to push you so far that you walk away.

C) they want to use your connections to sell their services, a common practice among recruiting/staffing agencies. It saves them the work of cold calling businesses, peddling their services. You give them 'warm' contacts--places that are interviewing are more likely to be receptive to their sales pitch.

I would respond as mentioned above, "why do you ask?". If they continue to push you to reveal your job search contacts, respond with something along the lines of "I am pursuing other leads but I'm not at liberty to discuss any details with you." And continue to refuse to offer details if they keep pushing.
I don't disagree with anything you've said except how to reply...

Regardless of their motivation, the right answer is 'how interested you are in working for them'...

I wouldn't offer any information on my prospects or what companies that I've applied to.
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Old 08-08-2010, 06:02 AM
 
2,017 posts, read 4,971,299 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by World Citizen View Post
Another good answer... especially since she's already had more than one interview.

However, they could also be considering how much they have to pay them... other opportunities would be a factor they would consider.

Yes and no.

See what people forget time and time again that it is not just the recruiter.

Hiring managers have work lives and even though they want to hire people-- it is usually one of the last things they have to concentrate on during the work day.

HR's job is to get people through the process-- and it can be very difficult when you have hiring managers who procrastinate or who just do not have a lot of bandwidth. HR may know that the manager is leaning to this candidate and HR wants to be able to intervene or at least firmly let the manager know, "Mr. Manager if you are really leaning towards Candidate Jane then Jane has mentioned that she has some additional upcoming interviews-- you may want to make some decision," blah blah blah.

Take for example my own interviews. I have to go through 4-5 more interviews (big team). Trying to herd that many schedules with MY schedule too is like herding cats. Now, I just happen to know what is going on because my company's policy is to be very open with the entire process (i.e. the recruiter calls the internal candidates to let them know the status each week or sends them an email). Finally, the recruiter, hiring managers, and I decided that it would be okay to intersperse the interviews throughout the week based on people's availability versus trying to do a marathon session.

Now, if I were an outside candidate-- I could have been fretting for why I was not getting more interviews when they had mentioned I would, etc.
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Old 08-08-2010, 06:06 AM
 
2,017 posts, read 4,971,299 times
Reputation: 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by kodaka View Post
A) They are subtly letting you know that you don't have a good chance of getting this job and you should be pursuing other opportunities.

B) they plan on stringing you along and dragging out this hiring process but they don't want to push you so far that you walk away.

C) they want to use your connections to sell their services, a common practice among recruiting/staffing agencies. It saves them the work of cold calling businesses, peddling their services. You give them 'warm' contacts--places that are interviewing are more likely to be receptive to their sales pitch.

I would respond as mentioned above, "why do you ask?". If they continue to push you to reveal your job search contacts, respond with something along the lines of "I am pursuing other leads but I'm not at liberty to discuss any details with you." And continue to refuse to offer details if they keep pushing.
I would say A-- even when I was recruiting back in the late 90s would have never occurred to me to do. Because honestly, if they were not interested, I would not be letting you down gently. Nor would I be giving you the other carrot dangling saying you are going to have more interviews.

If this is a third party recruiter then even C may not necessarily be the best answer either. When I worked as a third party recruiter, I did not go out and try to get business. We had sales reps for that--- I have found that firms where the recruiter is working two desks sales and then employment you get a master at none. I didn't ever pass leads like that onto another group for sales contacts. Everytime I asked that question was a gauge for me as to how hard I needed to push the hiring managers.
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Old 08-08-2010, 06:31 AM
 
301 posts, read 992,961 times
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I was leaning towards the fact that she wants to know if I am interviewing and/or getting offers etc. It's just that she has asked this FOUR times now. So, when she called me last week with feedback on my first interview and tips on my second interview.. she asked me again. It's just a recurring theme. I know that I am up against one other person so my shot is 50/50. The company recruiter (NOT 3rd party) says I have the technical skills for this position. I met with the woman I would be working with on my second interview... we hit it off pretty well (we had some interesting things in common) so, if I am a strong candidate (as the other one is) then, I can only hope I can win this with some aspect of my personality.
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