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Old 12-20-2010, 07:57 PM
 
Location: LA
6,243 posts, read 12,031,680 times
Reputation: 2580

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the amount of rain this early in the season is something different. i remember el nino sometime from the 90s where it rained almost everyday for months, but that was more towards spring (mar, april, may). this storm pattern we're in also isn't very cold, which seems odd. apparently the big bear resorts are closed because it's raining, not snowing in the mountains.

anyways, as for the proverbial 'freaking out' because of the rain, it's all BS. i don't know anyone who freaks out when they have to drive in the rain and nearly all my friends and family are here. it's really a myth that is propagated by the media as far as i'm concerned. the only issue i see is as mentioned above, some people don't adjust their driving habits to handle the wet roads. unless we're getting torrential rainfall (which is almost never), most people just go on their merry way and deal with it.
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Old 12-20-2010, 07:59 PM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,585 posts, read 20,566,351 times
Reputation: 16144
Quote:
Originally Posted by readymade View Post
Yikes! I take back my laughing. Evacuations called as storm saturates California - Yahoo! News (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_california_storm - broken link)

I don't get it, the rain really doesn't seem that bad! It's only been raining for a few days, and not that hard. Horrifying.
Being from Boston, you probably have a bit of a problem grasping the effect of elevation on water flow, so here's a short primer:

Mountains surround most of the population centers in So Cal. When I say mountains, I mean REAL mountains, not the small hillocks that pass for mountains in Eastern Mass. Natural drainage features called canyons collect the runoff from the saturated watershed in the tall mountains. These canyons drain into the valleys below the mountains and sometimes overwhelm the man made flood control devices (assuming any exist) . Evacuations ensue.

The above is 1000 times worse in the areas below recent wildfires.

And thus you have life in So Cal when it rains a lot.

THE END
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Old 12-20-2010, 08:07 PM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,585 posts, read 20,566,351 times
Reputation: 16144
Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
Fontucky, you know things...
Doesn't mean I remember stuff.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
What year was it that LA got 6" in about 24 hours? '94 ish?
I don't remember. See what I mean?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
Also Remember the day Queen Elizabeth visited Reagan at his ranch?
Nope.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
So how much rain have you gotten? Did they close any freeways? How about Disneyland?
At this point, South Fontana is at 1.20" since midnight and 4.18" for the month.

The only road closure I'm aware of (in other words, a road closure that might affect me) is the 241 toll road in OC.
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Old 12-20-2010, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Aliso Viejo, Orange County, CA
2,687 posts, read 2,474,062 times
Reputation: 1829

So how much rain have you gotten? Did they close any freeways? How about Disneyland
?

Flooding, mudslides and rocks affecting roadways
Published: Dec. 20, 2010
Updated: 4:57 p.m.

Flooding, mudslides and rocks impact OC freeways and roadways | flooding, northbound, highway - News - The Orange County Register
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Old 12-20-2010, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Sherman Oaks, CA
5,163 posts, read 10,306,221 times
Reputation: 5825
In addition to what Fontucky said, you also need to keep in mind that while the coastal plain might get an inch or two of rain (over four inches so far with this storm system), the mountains are getting two to three times that due to orographic lifting.

Here is a rather complicated explanation, but it's interesting:

OROGRAPHIC LIFTING ON WINDWARD SIDE OF MOUNTAINS IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Quote:
Originally Posted by readymade View Post
Yikes! I take back my laughing. Evacuations called as storm saturates California - Yahoo! News (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_california_storm - broken link)

I don't get it, the rain really doesn't seem that bad! It's only been raining for a few days, and not that hard. Horrifying.
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Old 12-20-2010, 09:01 PM
 
Location: USA
2,364 posts, read 1,572,153 times
Reputation: 1854
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fontucky View Post
Being from Boston, you probably have a bit of a problem grasping the effect of elevation on water flow, so here's a short primer:

Mountains surround most of the population centers in So Cal. When I say mountains, I mean REAL mountains, not the small hillocks that pass for mountains in Eastern Mass. Natural drainage features called canyons collect the runoff from the saturated watershed in the tall mountains. These canyons drain into the valleys below the mountains and sometimes overwhelm the man made flood control devices (assuming any exist) . Evacuations ensue.

The above is 1000 times worse in the areas below recent wildfires.

And thus you have life in So Cal when it rains a lot.

THE END
Thank you.
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Old 12-20-2010, 09:07 PM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,585 posts, read 20,566,351 times
Reputation: 16144
My pleasure.
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Old 12-20-2010, 09:19 PM
 
1,496 posts, read 1,334,588 times
Reputation: 734
I do not like the weather in February! ! !
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Old 12-22-2010, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Prepperland
8,042 posts, read 4,396,813 times
Reputation: 3474
In light of the risk from mudslides, is there a reason why terracing of hillsides is not practical?
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Old 12-22-2010, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,362 posts, read 55,963,918 times
Reputation: 16422
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetgraphics View Post
In light of the risk from mudslides, is there a reason why terracing of hillsides is not practical?
Which hillsides?
Who pays for it?

Lots of hillsides to terrace. Probably cheaper to accept the risk of occasional mudslides and not terrace every single hillside in the world.
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