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Old 01-16-2011, 02:04 PM
 
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Does anyone like the Harris Teeter sweet tea? I actually like it, but its not as sweet as how my mother makes it. I can actually taste the flavor of the tea and not just sugar.
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Old 01-16-2011, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Reston, VA
74 posts, read 69,082 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghett61 View Post
Does anyone like the Harris Teeter sweet tea? I actually like it, but its not as sweet as how my mother makes it. I can actually taste the flavor of the tea and not just sugar.
My husband said it was too weak. It's just as easy to make rather than buy, so now I just make it for him. I don't like the stuff - and I consider myself Southern!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthJerseyStyx
Okay, no kidding. Actually, I think it's a treat for most people. Unless some folks drink it every day?
He would drink it every day if there were always some around! He tries to only drink it on the weekends (or his days off.) I DO know people who drink it every day, but it's not real healthy. But, it's no worse than drinking several sodas a day. Probably better, because if you make it yourself you're not putting preservatives and chemicals in it - it's "all natural". But, hey, laying out in the sun is "all natural" too, but it sure isn't good for you!
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Old 01-16-2011, 07:22 PM
 
422 posts, read 583,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TripleH1978 View Post
My husband said it was too weak. It's just as easy to make rather than buy, so now I just make it for him. I don't like the stuff - and I consider myself Southern!!
My wife doesn't like sweet tea either, so you are not alone. We are from Alabama so its hard to get more southern than that.
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Old 01-16-2011, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Expatriate Philadelphian in Northern Virginia
7,754 posts, read 11,854,000 times
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Interestingly enough, there is an article in today's Washington Post about the level of "Southernness" in the DC region.

D.C. area and Dixie drifting farther and farther apart

I found this quote in particular to be telling:

"I do think we've reached a critical mass of some kind - we're not a real Southern state anymore," said former Virginia state senator Russell Potts, 71, a longtime lawmaker from Loudoun County and an independent gubernatorial candidate in 2005. "I happen to believe that southern Virginia now actually starts down near Richmond. You can't even say that Fredericksburg is Southern."
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Old 01-16-2011, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Northern Va
1,078 posts, read 1,076,117 times
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The Civil war ended hundred years ago so the whole "Southern" th ing is really a mismnomer.
Yes historically it was the heart of the south, but this area particularly nova is so transient.
Hasnt this topic been beaten to death already on this forum? I have lived in GA,AL and FL and NOVA is far from southern.
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Old 01-16-2011, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Expatriate Philadelphian in Northern Virginia
7,754 posts, read 11,854,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Novadhd5150 View Post
The Civil war ended hundred years ago so the whole "Southern" thing is really a misnomer.
Yes historically it was the heart of the south, but this area particularly nova is so transient.
Hasnt this topic been beaten to death already on this forum? I have lived in GA,AL and FL and NOVA is far from southern.
The article that I just referenced does make similar points to yours. As this thread has been fairly active over the last few weeks, I'd say there's some life left in it yet.
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Old 01-17-2011, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Sterling, VA
1,044 posts, read 1,840,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tone509 View Post
Interestingly enough, there is an article in today's Washington Post about the level of "Southernness" in the DC region.

D.C. area and Dixie drifting farther and farther apart

I found this quote in particular to be telling:

"I do think we've reached a critical mass of some kind - we're not a real Southern state anymore," said former Virginia state senator Russell Potts, 71, a longtime lawmaker from Loudoun County and an independent gubernatorial candidate in 2005. "I happen to believe that southern Virginia now actually starts down near Richmond. You can't even say that Fredericksburg is Southern."
I wouldn't rely on this reporter's facts too strongly. Russell Potts is from Winchester, VA, which is in Frederick county, attended Handley High School in Winchester(as did my husband), and has a big house on Handley Boulevard across from Handley High School.

I do agree that southern Virginia starts down near Richmond, the tidewater accent is much stronger there.
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Old 01-17-2011, 08:46 AM
 
469 posts, read 523,838 times
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Yummmm.. Sweet tea! When I was living in North Carolina, that's what you were served when you asked for iced tea. I think there is an art to making it--you have to make the "simple syrup" (ie, 2 pounds of sugar, I'm sure, for just a few glasses! -- joking, but maybe there's truth in that!).

A friend of mine here, who was raised in N.C., brought me in some sweet tea that she made, and it absolutely, positively was a high! I was chugging it all night at work and was bouncing off the ceiling, but in a good way -- not like the Mountain Dew Code Red "high" that did this and also made my whole body feel like it needed paramedics.

If you're in a Harris Teeter, look in the coffee/tea aisle for Sweet Leaf Iced Tea. The variety with mint and honey is a good takeoff on traditional sweet tea and delicious. It's in a plastic bottle and has a green label (there are other varieties of Sweet Leaf, but not as good).

To the main question on this topic: I'm living in N.Va., but that doesn't make me a Southerner. I think basically we should be called "transplants," a kinder term for what we were called before. Being a Southerner conjures up a whole lot of facets -- foods, accents, how you think your pace of life should be, the smell of magnolia in the area, for starters. (Well, in N.C., it was the smell of magnolia mixed with tobacco from the Reynolds factories, at the time!)
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Old 01-17-2011, 05:25 PM
 
Location: In the woods
3,286 posts, read 5,152,551 times
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The article doesn't really say much more than what we are discussing here. They begin with how many businesses in D.C. have "Southern" words including "Dixie" and how the Confederate Flag is barely flown anymore. They talk to a few Af-Ams who say D.C. still has a southern flavor but that's it.

I always like to hear what people have to say about where they live, have lived, etc. It's pretty obvious that the transient and immigrant population has changed the area. Heck, we all could have written a better article . . . .

Speaking of food: I do have to admit though that there's been a lack of "soul food" in the last 20 yrs. When I worked downtown, I found a Baptist church that served lunch on Fridays and yum, yum! We found a place out here in Winchester and it's very yummy. Had some ribs, potato salad, and cabbage the other day!
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Old 01-17-2011, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,141 posts, read 16,221,348 times
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Amazing that 150 years ago rebel territory for all practical purposes started just South of the Belle View Shopping Center.
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