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Old 03-30-2022, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
32,160 posts, read 74,094,825 times
Reputation: 18344

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Independentthinking83 View Post
Or when Pittsburgh had 520,000 residents in 1970s? Was it crowded or felt crowded?

I remember talking to somebody that passed away a few years ago. She was talking about the city in the 60s. She said there was so many children and you couldn’t get on a ball field during good weather.

What was the highest enrollment of Pittsburgh public schools? In 1997 I think it was 40K. Today maybe 20k?
The average household size in the United States is now 2.60.

The average household size in Pittsburgh is now 1.98. I saw an article recently stating that Pittsburgh has one of the lowest percentages of its residents within city limits being under 18 in the country.

With that being said I believe the city's median age is only 33 (albeit I can't find that stat now). This means that despite having very few children we have a plethora of Millennials living in city limits that drags our median age down to being young.

We are also an educated city with nearly half of adults age 25 or older possessing at least a Bachelor's Degree. It's a shame our median wages don't reflect that because local employers generally don't pay well.
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Old 03-31-2022, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Ben Avon/Kilbuck
1,700 posts, read 849,141 times
Reputation: 642
I think that makes sense in terms of most peoples way of life. Getting married and moving to the burbs is a stereotype because its often true. Aside from just not being a city person, I could not image trying to raise kids in the city at least when they are young. It would be so much more work on top of the work being a new parent.
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Old 03-31-2022, 06:06 PM
 
Location: In Transition
3,828 posts, read 1,348,353 times
Reputation: 1455
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
The average household size in the United States is now 2.60.

The average household size in Pittsburgh is now 1.98. I saw an article recently stating that Pittsburgh has one of the lowest percentages of its residents within city limits being under 18 in the country.

With that being said I believe the city's median age is only 33 (albeit I can't find that stat now). This means that despite having very few children we have a plethora of Millennials living in city limits that drags our median age down to being young.

We are also an educated city with nearly half of adults age 25 or older possessing at least a Bachelor's Degree. It's a shame our median wages don't reflect that because local employers generally don't pay well.
Maybe it is the college students that are making the cities median age 33. Pittsburghs wages and jobs growth are poor. That’s what stunts it’s growth. If you look at the cities growing in the north and Midwest (there aren’t many) it’s due to a very good economy and jobs growth. Washington DC, Indianapolis, Columbus and Grand Rapids have one thing in common. The jobs are aplenty and the wages paid are very good for each of their respective regions. I love Pittsburgh and I have said this before, we are kinda stuck in a no man’s land. Too Far East to be Midwest. Too far west to be considered truly northeast.

Growth and jobs stop at Columbus and Harrisburg with little left inbetween. You can see that clearly driving I-70. Drive from Harrisburg to Columbus or vice versa. What do you see in between, beautiful landscape but hardly any economic growth. Growth ends in Dauphin County, Pa and licking county, Ohio. I love the laurel highlands. I love wheeling area and small towns in between, but it is what it is. There isn’t much going on. Pittsburgh had a great 2010s. But it was always fragile. One little turn and we go back to negative. Not sure how you change it. Easier to build a chip plant on flatter land in Columbus than move mountains to build a plant here
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