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Old 02-22-2013, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,548,466 times
Reputation: 11937

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
They most certainly did. Local Anglos are making too big of a deal out of it as they're in a state of extreme uneasiness and fear with the PQ in power again. It's mostly got people from both linguistic groups laughing at the overzealousness of the OQLF.

Le mot pasta cause un «excès de zèle» | Émilie Bilodeau | Montréal

Tres funny.
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Old 02-22-2013, 04:30 PM
 
32 posts, read 162,522 times
Reputation: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwertyjjj View Post
If people weren't so scared of losing their culture or language then this underlying protectionism and arrogance that exists in Quebec would be long gone and be a happier place.

I could perfectly understand why the Quebecois are so concerned about losing their sense of identity and culture.

It is an admirable and honourable trait to be protective and proud of your own culture rather than let it dilute into the state that provinces like BC and Ontario have become today.
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Old 02-22-2013, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,548,466 times
Reputation: 11937
Quote:
Originally Posted by hystericblue View Post
I could perfectly understand why the Quebecois are so concerned about losing their sense of identity and culture.

It is an admirable and honourable trait to be protective and proud of your own culture rather than let it dilute into the state that provinces like BC and Ontario have become today.
I was with you until the B.C. and Ontario slag. What do you mean exactly?
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Old 02-22-2013, 04:48 PM
 
32 posts, read 162,522 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I was with you until the B.C. and Ontario slag. What do you mean exactly?
Being too culturally diverse as in the case of Ontario and BC is not a good thing. What's the point of having such a diverse society when there lacks an integration of all races and culture into one Canadian identity?

Although we need to respect one another's cultural background, i do think that a stronger sense of cohesion and community would result only from cultural assimilation (like in Quebec).
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Old 02-22-2013, 08:41 PM
 
1,395 posts, read 2,524,801 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Local Anglos are making too big of a deal out of it as they're in a state of extreme uneasiness and fear with the PQ in power again.
I wonder why. 1976, perhaps?
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Old 03-01-2013, 04:23 AM
 
Location: Canada
171 posts, read 273,807 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by hystericblue View Post
I could perfectly understand why the Quebecois are so concerned about losing their sense of identity and culture.

It is an admirable and honourable trait to be protective and proud of your own culture rather than let it dilute into the state that provinces like BC and Ontario have become today.
So, why do countries in Europe not worry about this? Yes, some of those countries have diluted their language with English but a very very minor amount. Some of those countries speak English incredibly well (Eastern European, Holland, Germany) but their culture is still intact.

I really believe the English vs French thing nowadays is driven by those people who never leave Quebec...and let's face it...there are a lot of people who never venture outside of Quebec and their view on the world is therefore restricted.
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Old 03-01-2013, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,875 posts, read 38,019,680 times
Reputation: 11645
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwertyjjj View Post
So, why do countries in Europe not worry about this? Yes, some of those countries have diluted their language with English but a very very minor amount. Some of those countries speak English incredibly well (Eastern European, Holland, Germany) but their culture is still intact.

I really believe the English vs French thing nowadays is driven by those people who never leave Quebec...and let's face it...there are a lot of people who never venture outside of Quebec and their view on the world is therefore restricted.
I know it is convenient for people in the rest of Canada to couch things in these terms, but this is an awfully simplistic analysis.

For starters, it's funny that you mentioned European locales that are COUNTRIES. Quebec is NOT a country. It is a province of Canada like all of the others, as is often stated. If Quebec were a country then obviously the language situation would be different but I don't think we really want to go that route.

As for only non-travelled rubes caring about this issue and not being "English-enthusiastic", once again this is a huge oversimplification. There are PQ members, supporters and politicians who are well-travelled and fluent in multiple languages and there are Liberal federalists who speak only French.

I can tell you from living in Quebec that there is no correlation between being a supporter of pro-French legislation, or Quebec independence or Canadian federalism, and a person's level of education or even "worldliness". If anything I believe that most polls have shown that separatist Quebecers have slightly higher levels of education than federalist ones.

Also note that most Quebecers, both federalist and separatist, do broadly support the language provisions. Although many of do shake our heads at dumb things such as "Pastagate".

Finally, I would invite you to read post 33 on here:

https://www.city-data.com/forum/canad...toronto-4.html
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Old 03-01-2013, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Toronto, ON
564 posts, read 1,040,354 times
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I've been to Quebec many, many times, and though this comment might come across as way over-generalized, I've basically found the following differences:

- An Anglo will not mock or demean a non-English person trying to converse or communicate with them in English. They will admire the effort and usually help them work through it.

- A Francophone *might* laugh in your face, smirk, or answer you in English if you make an attempt to speak their language. It might not be intended to condescend, ridicule, or come across as mean-spirited, but it is often interpreted that way. Most likely a result of overprotectionism and too much "us against them" sentiment in their culture. The *might* gives some people pause and makes them feel overly self-conscious about trying out their skills.

That being said, people are people, and you get a mix of good and bad everywhere.

I think the best description comes from the Onion's description of languages in Canada:

English: spoken
French: muttered
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Old 03-01-2013, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Canada
171 posts, read 273,807 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthYorkEd View Post
I've been to Quebec many, many times, and though this comment might come across as way over-generalized, I've basically found the following differences:

- An Anglo will not mock or demean a non-English person trying to converse or communicate with them in English. They will admire the effort and usually help them work through it.

- A Francophone *might* laugh in your face, smirk, or answer you in English if you make an attempt to speak their language. It might not be intended to condescend, ridicule, or come across as mean-spirited, but it is often interpreted that way. Most likely a result of overprotectionism and too much "us against them" sentiment in their culture. The *might* gives some people pause and makes them feel overly self-conscious about trying out their skills.

That being said, people are people, and you get a mix of good and bad everywhere.

I think the best description comes from the Onion's description of languages in Canada:

English: spoken
French: muttered
Had a funny experience in a Tim Hortons once on a highway stop.
A load of octogenarian tourists from Toronto got off the bus and there was a queue for the toilets. After a short while a kid comes into the toilet and just queue barges past everyone. One of the Toronto tourists mutters "must be French".
I come out to order a coffee and at the counter is another Toronto tourist ordering in English, the girl behind the counter shouts in an offended tone "this is Quebec, we do not speak English here!"

I left thinking that was pretty much a stereotypical experience of Anglo French relations in Quebec!
I am English from the UK by the way so I might over simplify Quebec life not fully understanding all the cultural implications but as an outsider I can't really understand all the aggravation.
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Old 03-01-2013, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,875 posts, read 38,019,680 times
Reputation: 11645
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwertyjjj View Post
Had a funny experience in a Tim Hortons once on a highway stop.
A load of octogenarian tourists from Toronto got off the bus and there was a queue for the toilets. After a short while a kid comes into the toilet and just queue barges past everyone. One of the Toronto tourists mutters "must be French".
I come out to order a coffee and at the counter is another Toronto tourist ordering in English, the girl behind the counter shouts in an offended tone "this is Quebec, we do not speak English here!"

I left thinking that was pretty much a stereotypical experience of Anglo French relations in Quebec!
I am English from the UK by the way so I might over simplify Quebec life not fully understanding all the cultural implications but as an outsider I can't really understand all the aggravation.
Absolutely shocking when you consider this absolutely never happens (with other languages) in places where the local language is English!
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