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Old 10-11-2019, 08:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
Ethnicity, urbanity and political views vary widely be region, so this doesn't make any sense to me whatsoever. Add to the mix of those three things stuff like music, food, architecture, slang, sports preferences and the like, and I think there are still very pronounced regional differences in the U.S. -- although I grant that the Internet has helped narrow, but not eliminate regional differences over the past generation.

I think it's totally absurd to say there are no discernible regional differences between, say, Low Country South Carolina and Cajun Louisiana, between downtown San Francisco and downtown Columbus Ohio (two cities with about the same population), between suburban Boston and suburban Atlanta --- or a million other regional comparisons you might make.

Moreover, a regionally discernible personality -- whatever that means -- probably does not exist. I've meet some of the friendliest kindest people in New York, Seattle, and Philadelphia, which are supposedly cities where people have and 'edge', and some of the most mean-spirited, stupid folks ever in the so-called 'heartland' Midwest, which some consider the 'real' America. When I travel, I make no assumptions anymore about how people will behave because my assumptions have been proven wrong enough for me to know that, to use a cliche, you cannot tell a book by its cover -- or where it's shelved in the library.

Regional differences definitely exist and will manifest themselves in all sorts of ways, but hardly ever, I'd say, in ways that determine inherent personality and behavior.
I very much agree with you. Having lived in different regions I can attest to the personality differences alone
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Old 10-11-2019, 11:30 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
7,363 posts, read 4,045,849 times
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Get off the interstate, get out of suburbia. There are differences -- some by degrees and some pronounced. Cajun, Creole, South Texas, New Mexico, Bay Area, Appalachian, South Florida, and the Mississippi Delta all have distinct differences.

I moved to New Mexico from the midwest's rural river culture and the two are profoundly different. New Mexico has 1000 years of architecture. There are several languages commonly spoken. The food is very different. The history is very long and involved. This is all reflected in the culture. I suspect that other regions might have similar differences.
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Old 10-11-2019, 11:38 PM
 
283 posts, read 101,056 times
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Chicago to Milwaukee to Indianopolis to St louis felt similar enough.

LA, SF, Seattle, etc did not
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Old 10-11-2019, 11:45 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
1,165 posts, read 413,988 times
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Race is a much much bigger differentiator in America than region IMO.
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Old 10-11-2019, 11:53 PM
 
2,653 posts, read 809,634 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Veritas Vincit View Post
Race is a much much bigger differentiator in America than region IMO.
Yes. To some extent, black New York and white New York feel like different cities
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Old 10-11-2019, 11:57 PM
 
2,653 posts, read 809,634 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
Get off the interstate, get out of suburbia. There are differences -- some by degrees and some pronounced. Cajun, Creole, South Texas, New Mexico, Bay Area, Appalachian, South Florida, and the Mississippi Delta all have distinct differences.

I moved to New Mexico from the midwest's rural river culture and the two are profoundly different. New Mexico has 1000 years of architecture. There are several languages commonly spoken. The food is very different. The history is very long and involved. This is all reflected in the culture. I suspect that other regions might have similar differences.
I briefly went to Gray, Louisiana and other than the landscape, it didn't feel "different" to me.

And very few young people in Louisana still speak French
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Old 10-11-2019, 11:58 PM
 
2,653 posts, read 809,634 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago_Person View Post
Chicago to Milwaukee to Indianopolis to St louis felt similar enough.

LA, SF, Seattle, etc did not
Cities can still have different vibes, but how much different are the people really?
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Old 10-12-2019, 01:10 AM
 
58,699 posts, read 83,293,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
I'm from NYC and I know aboug Spiedies and Garbage Plates
Some may, but some don't. Let alone actually eat either one of them.
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Old 10-12-2019, 01:14 AM
 
58,699 posts, read 83,293,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
I don't know what constitutes "New England" but there are only two college teams up there in Division 1 (UCONN, BC) and then Syracuse and Army in upstate NY. Not a lot to get excited about. With all the pro interest in that area I'm surprised these teams draw as well as they do.
UMass and Buffalo would be frustrated with you. J/k

With that said, you're right about the pull the pro teams have, unless those college teams are doing pretty good.
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Old 10-12-2019, 01:27 AM
 
Location: WA Desert, Seattle native
6,184 posts, read 4,105,888 times
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I believe our culture is somewhat defined by national trends, found in movies, tv, social media, etc. more than at any point in our history. The differences, while still there, are decreasing. Plus, we are a more mobile society today than in the past. So regional and/or State differences become less and less. While they do still exist in certain areas, there is a general culture that can be found in about 95% of the U.S., with differences being small and petty. I am not talking politics and/or religion here, but even that is becoming more standardized. Slowly.

That said, regional accents still exist, (Southern, New England, Urban Northeast stand out). I have always noticed a midwestern accent as well, but more subtle. I hope we never lose those and I don't think we will as many who move into or out of regional accent areas tend to eventually lose or gain that accent.

I like the differences, but I think they are lessening.
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