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Old 08-13-2012, 11:37 AM
PJA
 
2,410 posts, read 2,579,051 times
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Taken from the Encyclopedia Britannica

Encyclopedia
metropolis
a major city together with its suburbs and nearby cities, towns, and environs over which the major city exercises a commanding economic and social influence. Literally construed, metropolis from the Greek means "mother city," and by implication there are progeny or dependents scattered about the core area. Sometimes there may be two or more major cities, as in the Tokyo-Yokohama Metropolitan Area (Japan) or an agglomeration of metropolitan boroughs as in Greater London (England). The U.S. Census employs a unit called a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) which includes either (1) a city with a population of at least 50,000 or (2) an urbanized area of at least 50,000 population with a total metropolitan population of at least 100,000 (75,000 in New England). An urbanized area is defined as having a population of at least 50,000, and a population density of at least 1,000 per square mile.

Learn more about metropolis with a free trial on Britannica.com.


Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Columbus,Georgia
2,663 posts, read 4,115,577 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PJA View Post
Those are not Columbus' metro stats.
It's the CSA! You can't compare Columbus metro to Augusta metro.Clearly Augusta metro is supported by its surrounding counties. Unlike Columbus,Savannah and Macon. This is why you compare their (Columbus,Savannah and Macon) CSA stats to Augusta MSA stats.
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:42 AM
 
31,840 posts, read 29,532,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PJA View Post
Taken from the Encyclopedia Britannica

Encyclopedia
metropolis
a major city together with its suburbs and nearby cities, towns, and environs over which the major city exercises a commanding economic and social influence. Literally construed, metropolis from the Greek means "mother city," and by implication there are progeny or dependents scattered about the core area. Sometimes there may be two or more major cities, as in the Tokyo-Yokohama Metropolitan Area (Japan) or an agglomeration of metropolitan boroughs as in Greater London (England). The U.S. Census employs a unit called a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) which includes either (1) a city with a population of at least 50,000 or (2) an urbanized area of at least 50,000 population with a total metropolitan population of at least 100,000 (75,000 in New England). An urbanized area is defined as having a population of at least 50,000, and a population density of at least 1,000 per square mile.

Learn more about metropolis with a free trial on Britannica.com.


Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Exactly. The articles gives examples like Tokyo and London. Enough said.
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Closer than you think!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mutiny77 View Post
exactly. The articles gives examples like tokyo and london. Enough said.

lmao!
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:51 AM
PJA
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Exactly. The articles gives examples like Tokyo and London. Enough said.

Did you even read the whole article? Specifically the bold part which pretty much is stating that a metropolis is a metropolitan area.

Encyclopedia
metropolis
a major city together with its suburbs and nearby cities, towns, and environs over which the major city exercises a commanding economic and social influence. Literally construed, metropolis from the Greek means "mother city," and by implication there are progeny or dependents scattered about the core area. Sometimes there may be two or more major cities, as in the Tokyo-Yokohama Metropolitan Area (Japan) or an agglomeration of metropolitan boroughs as in Greater London (England). The U.S. Census employs a unit called a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) which includes either (1) a city with a population of at least 50,000 or (2) an urbanized area of at least 50,000 population with a total metropolitan population of at least 100,000 (75,000 in New England). An urbanized area is defined as having a population of at least 50,000, and a population density of at least 1,000 per square mile.

Learn more about metropolis with a free trial on Britannica.com.


Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:55 AM
PJA
 
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Definition of metropolitan

metropolitan

Example Sentences Origin
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met·ro·pol·i·tan

   [me-truh-pol-i-tn] Show IPA
adjective 1. of, noting, or characteristic of a metropolis or its inhabitants, especially in culture, sophistication, or in accepting and combining a wide variety of people, ideas, etc.

2. of or pertaining to a large city, its surrounding suburbs, and other neighboring communities: the New York metropolitan area.

3. pertaining to or constituting a mother country.

4. pertaining to an ecclesiastical metropolis.
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:58 AM
 
31,840 posts, read 29,532,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PJA View Post
Did you even read the whole article? Specifically the bold part which pretty much is stating that a metropolis is a metropolitan area.

Encyclopedia
metropolis
a major city together with its suburbs and nearby cities, towns, and environs over which the major city exercises a commanding economic and social influence. Literally construed, metropolis from the Greek means "mother city," and by implication there are progeny or dependents scattered about the core area. Sometimes there may be two or more major cities, as in the Tokyo-Yokohama Metropolitan Area (Japan) or an agglomeration of metropolitan boroughs as in Greater London (England). The U.S. Census employs a unit called a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) which includes either (1) a city with a population of at least 50,000 or (2) an urbanized area of at least 50,000 population with a total metropolitan population of at least 100,000 (75,000 in New England). An urbanized area is defined as having a population of at least 50,000, and a population density of at least 1,000 per square mile.

Learn more about metropolis with a free trial on Britannica.com.


Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
I sure did and it's not equating an MSA with a metropolis; it's merely stating the statistical unit the U.S. employs to designate a metropolitan area. So if you want to go around calling Rome, Hinesville, Brunswick, and Dalton "metropolises," knock yourself out. Just be prepared for the ridicule sure to follow.

And why do you even persist on continuing down this road when you yourself acknowledged that the person who used the term relative to Augusta obviously meant "metropolitan"? IT'S A MOOT POINT. Let it go.
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Old 08-13-2012, 12:02 PM
 
980 posts, read 1,273,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
And that's fine; that wasn't the main point of my argument anyway. There's no arrogance on my part at all since I don't have a dog in the fight and I'm not at all affected. Y'all work out that naming thing.

The major point I was getting at is that progressive local civic and business leadership has been the major driving force in Atlanta's growth and prosperity and that's largely been missing in the second-tier cities--which this whole fiasco with Azziz appears to demonstrate if it's as serious as you say it is.

Yea... but Azziz is supposed to be this "progressive" leader from the West Coast along with the Board of Regents, they're hardly "Augustans".

The institution will build itself, it will be a National top 50 research institute according to the Governor... the kind've help that Atlanta has been receiving for years/decades. Private money and philanthropists can only go so far without help from Federal/State and local governments... do you deny this? Interstates don't run through downtown Atlanta without years and years of planning ahead of time, airports aren't expanded to the extent of Hartsfield without major planning years/decades in advance... not many if any cities operate on a if we build it they will come mentality, ask Birmingham and their infrastructure debacle, they're bankrupt. Sorry, but I can't help to believe that Atlanta got what they wanted.

I don't doubt that Atlanta had some forward thinking leaders, but to say it wasn't significantly helped while the other 2nd tier cities weren't... that's just not possible with the explosion of growth that took place. It was given an advantage, hence the disconnect in the state.

Agree to disagree... I'm not sure where you're from, but that's just how it is outside of Atlanta in the State of Georgia.
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Old 08-13-2012, 12:04 PM
PJA
 
2,410 posts, read 2,579,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I sure did and it's not equating an MSA with a metropolis; it's merely stating the statistical unit the U.S. employs to designate a metropolitan area. So if you want to go around calling Rome, Hinesville, Brunswick, and Dalton "metropolises," knock yourself out. Just be prepared for the ridicule sure to follow.

And why do you even persist on continuing down this road when you yourself acknowledged that the person who used the term relative to Augusta obviously meant "metropolitan"? IT'S A MOOT POINT. Let it go.
And it stated it in the definition of a metropolis. Hence inferring that the terms are interchangeable. If not then why would it even mention the statistical unit that US employs if they were not the same thing. The fact of the matter is the term metropolitan area is another term for metropolis.
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Old 08-13-2012, 12:08 PM
PJA
 
2,410 posts, read 2,579,051 times
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United States


New York City is the world's largest financial center, as well as one of the most influential cultural centers in the world.


In the United States an incorporated area or group of areas having a population more than 50,000 is required to have a metropolitan planning organization in order to facilitate major infrastructure projects and to ensure financial solvency. Thus, a population of 50,000 or greater has been used as a de facto standard in the United States to define a metropolis. A similar definition is used by the United States Census Bureau. They define a metropolitan statistical area as at least one urbanized area of 50,000 or more inhabitants. The five largest metropolitan cities in the US are New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, and Philadelphia.
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