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Old 06-17-2017, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
6,688 posts, read 5,450,079 times
Reputation: 23139

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Quote:
Originally Posted by convextech View Post
Hahaha, how are those rocks cold if they have hot water rolling over them? Glad you're OK
Well there was still snow on the ground and it was about 40 degrees out...so I thought they were cold rocks. Obviously if they have boiling water flowing on them... not so cold. At least I just burned the tip of a finger.
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Old 06-17-2017, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
15,911 posts, read 12,700,152 times
Reputation: 11959


Just testing to see if this picture comes out? The bison are the biggest killers at Yellowstone. One week after I took this picture (if it post) there was a photographer that was gored by a bison. I have to wonder if it was the same animal I have in my picture?
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Old 06-18-2017, 03:28 AM
 
5,162 posts, read 3,068,112 times
Reputation: 8290
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post

Just testing to see if this picture comes out? The bison are the biggest killers at Yellowstone. One week after I took this picture (if it post) there was a photographer that was gored by a bison. I have to wonder if it was the same animal I have in my picture?

Read post #25, paragraph 3, it explains "killer bison". You can't fix stupid.
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Old 06-18-2017, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Type 0.7 Kardashev
10,576 posts, read 7,624,254 times
Reputation: 37555
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Out West there is a different attitude than we have back East. Many places out there have no guard rails or protective railings.
Yellowstone is a federal park - it is no more likely to be managed by a 'westerner' than is an eastern National Park such as Everglades or Acadia.

Quote:
Originally Posted by convextech View Post
Have you ever been to Yellowstone? The springs are at least a hundred feet from the boardwalk.
Hardly.



And in some cases, the walk goes right over hot water. An example is Grand Prismatic Spring, where the boardwalk not only comes a lot closer than 100' to the spring itself, but passes right over the outflow stream (the 160F spring produces about 10 gallons of water/minute, which spills over and out of the spring and forms a very hot stream which flows into the nearby Firehole River).

When you have millions of people visiting a place like Yellowstone, it is not surprising that a few get injured each year, most through their own foolishness but probably a few through sheer bad luck - even the most careful of us trip or otherwise have an inadvertent mishap now and then.
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Old 06-18-2017, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,916 posts, read 11,594,243 times
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I'd love to see a video showing the construction of that boardwalk and bridge.

P.S. I've been on it. It would take real effort to get over the railing.
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Old 06-18-2017, 04:57 PM
 
Location: New York Area
18,433 posts, read 7,291,931 times
Reputation: 14135
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
I'd love to see a video showing the construction of that boardwalk and bridge.

P.S. I've been on it. It would take real effort to get over the railing.
Darwin Award winners do that all the time. Usually only once though.
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Old 06-19-2017, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
15,911 posts, read 12,700,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unsettomati View Post
Yellowstone is a federal park - it is no more likely to be managed by a 'westerner' than is an eastern National Park such as Everglades or Acadia.
What is different is the scale. You don't have one mile up over your head or one mile down under your feet. Our prominent mountain is about 3,000 ft high - not 8,000+. You also don't have the extreme temperature/weather changes of the high altitude Rockies back East - elevation is everything and our Government (out West) simply has so much more to protect from the idiots. I don't know, but pretending that one Park has the same dollars as the next; means you have to stretch those dollars farther.
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Old 06-19-2017, 12:19 PM
 
17,341 posts, read 21,548,628 times
Reputation: 35098
Quote:
Originally Posted by Giesela View Post
You can break your neck falling down in your bathtub. Have to know more about whether they purposefully and willfully climbed over some railing, were drunk or ? Maybe he just tripped and fell. Some of you guys are kinda quick to blame.
Maybe if his mother had been a man she would have been his father.

Quick to blame? Please.

Try reading the article, and the one about the idiot from Oregon who died last year doing the same thing.
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Old 06-19-2017, 07:31 PM
 
9,906 posts, read 9,856,355 times
Reputation: 31306
Quote:
Originally Posted by FullArmor View Post
I've wanted to visit Yellowstone for a long time, but the stories of all the disrespectful visitors makes me want to stay away. There is plenty of photographic evidence of people doing things they shouldn't there. They ignore signs and go off trail, throw things into the pools and geysers and mess with the wildlife.

I don't wish harm or death on anyone, but what is with all these entitled jerks that think rules (and safety warnings...) don't apply to them? Big dangerous animals and boiling hot water don't care much about your need to get interesting selfies. I guess the risk of being mauled, trampled or boiled is worth the "likes"...
I've been to Yellowstone any number of times. I used to snowmobile in in the winter when you could it individually without being in a group. Its a magnificent park, but there is danger everywhere you look. Walkways have been constructed around the numerous hot springs in the park. Signs everywhere tell visitors to "stay on the walks" and not go off on their own. People do it anyway. What they don't realize is that the soil is not as solid as they imagine. You can take a step into the soil and it can give way beneath yu allowing you to fall into a boiling hot springs. You see, Yellowstone sits on the edge of a techtonic plate.
That's where volcanoes erupt, earthquakes occur, and hot springs are found. Wildlife is abundant and many people act like idiots around bison, elk, and moose. They assume that since the animal is just grazing it won't mind if you walk up to it to take pictures. Virtually every year tourists are gored by these animals because they got too close to the animals and spooked them. Many roads and highways are very narrow in different places in the park. Its easy to drive off the road and people drive off cliffs with some frequency. Add tourists who consume alcohol to the mix and you have a virtual time bomb that will explode.

People need to stop treating Yellowstone like a playground and start respecting the land. Many do, but there are always those who fail to see the danger.
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Old 06-21-2017, 02:18 AM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
23,236 posts, read 15,594,549 times
Reputation: 17260
Quote:
Originally Posted by John1960 View Post
Here's another accident Man killed in Yellowstone hot spring allegedly trying to "hot pot"

Man killed in Yellowstone hot spring allegedly trying to "hot po - KULR8.com | Local News, Weather & Sports | Billings, MT
There are quite a few hot springs in the park and just outside the boundaries that are unmarked. Some are locally popular hot pots.
The trouble with all the hot springs is their temperature can fluctuate a lot, and many do. One day, they may be cool enough to be safe, and the next day, they can boil a person alive. (or even just a few hours later).

So it's always risky. The folks who go hot-potting always carry thermometers, but even they aren't real good protection, as a spring can be quite cool on one end and blistering hot at the other. Sudden upwells of hot water into cooler springs can happen at any time too.

Marked or not, safe or not, anyone who's caught in a hot spring inside the park will get a ticket from the ranger. that can sure turn a good vacation sour. In all, it's not worth the risks, and since there are a lot of developed hot springs just outside Yellowstone's boundaries that are always safe to swim in, they are a much better choice.
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