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Old 11-12-2015, 02:02 PM
 
4 posts, read 3,673 times
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The reason why I thought it that way.
1. It was written in Japanese mixed with Chinese characters.
2. Chinese restaurants in Paris don't usually server Japanese cuisines, and there are not many Japanese tourists these days (because of the weak Yen). There is no reason for them to put advertise in Japanese for just Japanese tourists. And there are tons of Japanese restaurants in Paris, why would they go to Chinese restaurant to eat Japanese food? It was just a ordinary Chinese restaurant.
3. All the hostilities I faced whenever I entered a Chinese restaurant and didn't speak Chinese.

I couldn't take a picture because there were owners inside and they were looking.
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Old 11-12-2015, 02:31 PM
 
2,735 posts, read 916,921 times
Reputation: 1032
Quote:
Originally Posted by amdfanboy View Post
The reason why I thought it that way.
1. It was written in Japanese mixed with Chinese characters.
2. Chinese restaurants in Paris don't usually server Japanese cuisines, and there are not many Japanese tourists these days (because of the weak Yen). There is no reason for them to put advertise in Japanese for just Japanese tourists. And there are tons of Japanese restaurants in Paris, why would they go to Chinese restaurant to eat Japanese food? It was just a ordinary Chinese restaurant.
3. All the hostilities I faced whenever I entered a Chinese restaurant and didn't speak Chinese.

I couldn't take a picture because there were owners inside and they were looking.
How do you know it was written in Japanese? Hiragana? Katakana? Kanji? Romaji?

Better yet, why don't you just go in and ask what the sign says?
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Old 11-12-2015, 06:03 PM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,214,202 times
Reputation: 11624
Quote:
Originally Posted by amdfanboy View Post
The reason why I thought it that way.
1. It was written in Japanese mixed with Chinese characters.
2. Chinese restaurants in Paris don't usually server Japanese cuisines, and there are not many Japanese tourists these days (because of the weak Yen). There is no reason for them to put advertise in Japanese for just Japanese tourists. And there are tons of Japanese restaurants in Paris, why would they go to Chinese restaurant to eat Japanese food? It was just a ordinary Chinese restaurant.
3. All the hostilities I faced whenever I entered a Chinese restaurant and didn't speak Chinese.

I couldn't take a picture because there were owners inside and they were looking.
Did you see の、る、す、ま、です、or は on that sign? Or other simple, curvy looking characters on the sign? Then you were reading Japanese, not Chinese. Did you also see simple, angular looking characters like ア,エ,イ,オ,ウ? Then you were reading Japanese. If all you saw were blocky looking characters with lots of lines, then 99% chance you were reading Chinese and not Japanese.
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Old 11-12-2015, 06:31 PM
 
2,735 posts, read 916,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Did you see の、る、す、ま、です、or は on that sign? Or other simple, curvy looking characters on the sign? Then you were reading Japanese, not Chinese. Did you also see simple, angular looking characters like ア,エ,イ,オ,ウ? Then you were reading Japanese. If all you saw were blocky looking characters with lots of lines, then 99% chance you were reading Chinese and not Japanese.
The curvy looking characters are in Hiragana and the angular looking characters are in Katakana. Japanese use both plus they use Kanji all at the same time. Kanji is what you would consider to look like Chinese because basically Kanji is Chinese characters. To read a newspaper in Japan one needs to know all three types of characters: Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji. Each type is used for a specific purpose within the written language.
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Old 11-12-2015, 09:00 PM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,214,202 times
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Originally Posted by FC76-81 View Post
The curvy looking characters are in Hiragana and the angular looking characters are in Katakana. Japanese use both plus they use Kanji all at the same time. Kanji is what you would consider to look like Chinese because basically Kanji is Chinese characters. To read a newspaper in Japan one needs to know all three types of characters: Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji. Each type is used for a specific purpose within the written language.
Are you expanding upon what I said or are you informing me? Because I have passing knowledge of both Chinese and Japanese, especially Chinese thanks to my mom's Chinese husband.
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Old 11-13-2015, 09:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Are you expanding upon what I said or are you informing me? Because I have passing knowledge of both Chinese and Japanese, especially Chinese thanks to my mom's Chinese husband.
Both perhaps. You didn't mention Katakana and Hiragana by name so not sure why. Since you say you have passing knowledge of both, please provide your knowledge as to why Katakana is used, why Hiragana is used, and why Kanji is used in the same Japanese writings at the same time. As I indicated in my previous post, each type serves a specific purpose within the written language. What are those specific purposes, if you know. Japanese use all three in writing. Which purpose do each serve? If you know.
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Old 11-13-2015, 09:29 AM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,214,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FC76-81 View Post
Both perhaps. You didn't mention Katakana and Hiragana by name so not sure why. Since you say you have passing knowledge of both, please provide your knowledge as to why Katakana is used, why Hiragana is used, and why Kanji is used in the same Japanese writings at the same time. As I indicated in my previous post, each type serves a specific purpose within the written language. What are those specific purposes, if you know. Japanese use all three in writing. Which purpose do each serve? If you know.
Easy. Hiragana is used in adjective endings and verb endings, in addition to particles. Katakana is used for onomatopoeia, and foreign loan words. Kanji is used for nouns. Hiragana is also used for furigana, which for anyone who doesn't know, is tiny hiragana written to the right of or in top of kanji that aren't common or used in publications intended for school kids to show pronunciation
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Old 11-13-2015, 10:57 AM
 
2,735 posts, read 916,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Easy. Hiragana is used in adjective endings and verb endings, in addition to particles. Katakana is used for onomatopoeia, and foreign loan words. Kanji is used for nouns. Hiragana is also used for furigana, which for anyone who doesn't know, is tiny hiragana written to the right of or in top of kanji that aren't common or used in publications intended for school kids to show pronunciation
Or:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_writing_system
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Old 11-13-2015, 11:11 AM
 
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Prime example of all four (Hiragana, Katakana, Kanji and Romaji) being utilized at one time in one place:

Last edited by FC76-81; 10-06-2016 at 12:25 PM..
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Old 11-13-2015, 01:19 PM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,214,202 times
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Originally Posted by FC76-81 View Post
Sorry you thought I didn't know anything
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