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Old 02-11-2024, 07:55 PM
pdw pdw started this thread
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
2,674 posts, read 3,094,512 times
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I can imagine it’s a tough sell for rural voters to fund public housing with their taxes. The older generation in rural communities has a higher homeownership rate than urban areas and there’s less people in their 30s and 20s who are staying in their hometowns looking for housing these days, most young people leave unless they’re working for the family business.
Here in S Ontario, rural areas have gotten very expensive in the last few years. In many cases it’s actually more expensive than the cities, with the exception of Toronto, which is obviously the most expensive community.
I was googling real estate listings and houses 2 hours from Toronto, over an hour from London or Guelph are still like $700k+. I’d imagine a lot of young people are living at home while they raise their kids cause there’s just not many places to rent for them and their kids.
Would it being enticing to have a sort of federal plan where a certain amount of federal housing would be dedicated to rural areas experiencing high housing demand? I’d imagine the prairies are not as bad, and of course Quebec is a whole different ballpark, but BC and the Maritimes are having similar issues from what I’ve heard.
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Old 02-11-2024, 08:19 PM
 
1,224 posts, read 496,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdnirene View Post
I was born and raised in Winnipeg. I’ve heard talk about the need to revitalize the downtown core since I was a teenager. There was a lot less reason to travel downtown once suburban malls began to be built. That was a long time ago.

Hopefully more medical facilities downtown will ease pressure on the Health Sciences Centre Emergency room.
It is my understanding portage place was pretty busy and vibrant at one point. It's real shame what the area has become now. People have been stabbed inside. I am glad that it is getting renovated at the same time though, I can't help feel like we have given up on downtown. I think we can do better.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I don't understand why you said that. Are you saying that Portage Place where the new development will be happening to do just those things is not part of the downtown area? The article says it is downtown.
There will not be much retail that is part of this plan for the portage place redevelopment, that will be mostly gone. I don't think it was mentioned on that site, but at street level there will be public bathrooms, a 24 hour clinic and a 24 hour drop in centre for drug addicts. While these things are great it is not exactly what will bring families back to the area. I hope the project works out. The current location is already a gathering place for drug addicts and is a hot bed for crime. From what I have seen from other areas with similar services it just brings more drug addicts to the area.
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Old 02-11-2024, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,324,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdw View Post
I can imagine it’s a tough sell for rural voters to fund public housing with their taxes. The older generation in rural communities has a higher homeownership rate than urban areas and there’s less people in their 30s and 20s who are staying in their hometowns looking for housing these days, most young people leave unless they’re working for the family business.
Here in S Ontario, rural areas have gotten very expensive in the last few years. In many cases it’s actually more expensive than the cities, with the exception of Toronto, which is obviously the most expensive community.
I was googling real estate listings and houses 2 hours from Toronto, over an hour from London or Guelph are still like $700k+. I’d imagine a lot of young people are living at home while they raise their kids cause there’s just not many places to rent for them and their kids.
Would it being enticing to have a sort of federal plan where a certain amount of federal housing would be dedicated to rural areas experiencing high housing demand? I’d imagine the prairies are not as bad, and of course Quebec is a whole different ballpark, but BC and the Maritimes are having similar issues from what I’ve heard.
In my area, the population remained the same for years. Everything was pretty stagnant. But city people felt priced out of the Winnipeg market and began moving into the surrounding rural communities. In my community the "new" people outnumber the original families. As my neighbour stated, in the local church (there is only one) he knew people's names but he didn't KNOW them, the way he and I know each other going back to grandparents.

I have been following the local real estate listings for about 8 years and it has been a long time since I've seen anything under $335,000. I have seen houses for sale in Winnipeg for under $300,000. I see rents at $1300 - 1500 as being average here.

There is a shortage of affordable houses but it's not as bad as it is elsewhere. I think people are movibg into condos more than they used to.
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Old 02-12-2024, 02:19 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
3,624 posts, read 3,410,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I understand your point, but how would this work?

Some agency would need to monitor that they don't move to certain areas.

Provinces and territories would want a say on who gets who, if any.

You're a lawyer so perhaps you can address the next issue. I see lawsuits because of the Charter, where citizens and Permanent Residents ( which I assume new immigrants are ? ) have mobility rights.

Every citizen of Canada and every person who has the status of a permanent resident of Canada has the right:

(a) to move to and take up residence in any province; and
(b) to pursue the gaining of a livelihood in any province.


https://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/csj-sj...any%20province.
I don't see lawsuits. I see a solution in contractual terms, as regards legal immigrants.

"If you want to come to Canada, then you have to spend your first three years in Peace River, Alberta. [Or another place where housing is reasonably-priced.] If you agree, great; if you do not agree and insist on Toronto, Montreal, or Vancouver, then we don't want you, and you can go away." That's the language of contract: if you do this for us, we will do that for you. Offer, acceptance, consideration (in a contract context, "consideration" means "something of value"), consensus ad idem, and legality of object. In short, we're offering you the opportunity to immigrate to Canada, but under our terms. If you don't like them, if you don't want to enter into the contract, that's fine. You don't have to. But if you don't, then you don't come in.

It's easy enough to monitor. Witness all the times during Covid, when people were monitored to make sure they were quarantining after returning to Canada. Heck, our own Mightyqueen posted about how she was checked up on, mostly via phone calls, after she was admitted to Canada.

But it's a contract. Break the contract, by moving to Toronto three weeks after you've been allowed into Canada, and assigned to Peace River, and you'll be deported immediately. Mention Charter s. 6, and you'll be informed that a contract that both parties agreed to, can override the Charter. Happens every day--I might tell my employer that I'd like to move to Toronto, and they might say that I cannot.

Why? Because I've got a contract with my employer that says I have to be at the office in Alberta every day. Does this infringe upon my Charter s. 6 rights? No, because it's a contractual obligation between two parties, each of whom agreed to it.

Besides, after three years, they can move wherever they want to. Before that though, they're party to a contract that limits where they live.
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Old 02-12-2024, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,882 posts, read 38,026,310 times
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Add me to the list of people who are skeptical that a contract to compel immigrants to move to "the regions" would change things substantially.

You'd only get a tiny number who would stay - the random guy who falls in love with a local girl and marries into her family, or something like that.

99% would migrate to the major cities eventually.

I have seen this first-hand when Vietnamese boat people came to Canada in the late 1970s. Many of them were taken under the wing of French Canadian Catholic parishes in Quebec, New Brunswick and Eastern Ontario. While they were all very grateful for what was done for them in these communities, within about 20 years almost all of them were gone to Montreal or Toronto.

I remember one time meeting a Vietnamese guy in Montreal who spoke French with a southeastern New Brunswick Acadian accent. (It's very distinctive.)

When I asked him why he said his family had been taken in by the community in this small Acadian town about an hour outside Moncton, so that's where he grew up and learned his French. He never lost the accent.
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Old 02-12-2024, 08:16 AM
pdw pdw started this thread
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
2,674 posts, read 3,094,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by feverete View Post
Unfortunately after those three years they will most certainly move to the cities and the problem will continue.

I like your ideas though, you and Luisito seem to be the only ones who understand that the biggest challenge Canada is facing is the disproportionate number of immigrants from India, in the past they would send qualified good immigrants, now they are sending their trash who have no desire to integrate. For some reason most people try to avoid touching that topic.

As an immigrant to Canada, when I came to this country I was hoping to find multiculturalism, but when the vast majority of immigrants are coming from one single country that multiculturalism seems to dissipate.

I have experienced unpleasant moments with that population that have made me rethink whether Canada is where I want to be the rest of my life, which was my goal when I first came.

I have even considered moving to the US, which is not what I wanted with all those MAGA crazies down there, but at the same time, I'm not sure I want my kid to grow among a population where all his classmates in school will be talking in Punjabi or Hindi rather than English.

The sad part is that some fellow immigrants feel the same way.

It feels like Canada will be another Mumbai in 5-10 years.
I have no idea what you’re talking about. Just because there’s a large Indian community somewhere doesn’t mean they don’t want to integrate here. People like living close to their cousins, friends from back home, etc.What’s wrong with that? People from India come from all over India. Gujarat, Kerala, Punjab. These are all very different regional cultures there and the common language used when communicating is English. We have never in our history had such an educated group of immigrants coming here as we do today. Lots of people have master’s degrees and phds from India and unfortunately aren’t able to use those degrees here.

People in 1820: Wow, Pierre. Look at all these men in kilts. Soon Canada will look like Scotland
1880: Wow, Fergus. Look at all these Germans. Canada is turning into Berlin
1950: Look at all these Dutch immigrants, Otto. Soon Canada will be Amsterdam
1970: Look at all these Jamaican immigrants, Dirk. Soon Canada will be like Montego Bay
And so on it goes.

Last edited by pdw; 02-12-2024 at 08:25 AM..
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Old 02-12-2024, 08:24 AM
 
1,224 posts, read 496,993 times
Reputation: 760
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Add me to the list of people who are skeptical that a contract to compel immigrants to move to "the regions" would change things substantially.

You'd only get a tiny number who would stay - the random guy who falls in love with a local girl and marries into her family, or something like that.

99% would migrate to the major cities eventually.

I have seen this first-hand when Vietnamese boat people came to Canada in the late 1970s. Many of them were taken under the wing of French Canadian Catholic parishes in Quebec, New Brunswick and Eastern Ontario. While they were all very grateful for what was done for them in these communities, within about 20 years almost all of them were gone to Montreal or Toronto.

I remember one time meeting a Vietnamese guy in Montreal who spoke French with a southeastern New Brunswick Acadian accent. (It's very distinctive.)

When I asked him why he said his family had been taken in by the community in this small Acadian town about an hour outside Moncton, so that's where he grew up and learned his French. He never lost the accent.
I am one of those people. My family landed in rural nova scotia. I am glad as hell we didn't stay there. Beautifull place, very nice people just not a lot going on.
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Old 02-12-2024, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,882 posts, read 38,026,310 times
Reputation: 11650
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luisito80 View Post
I am one of those people. My family landed in rural nova scotia. I am glad as hell we didn't stay there. Beautifull place, very nice people just not a lot going on.
Voilà.
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Old 02-12-2024, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,882 posts, read 38,026,310 times
Reputation: 11650
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdw View Post
I have no idea what you’re talking about. Just because there’s a large Indian community somewhere doesn’t mean they don’t want to integrate here. People like living close to their cousins, friends from back home, etc.What’s wrong with that? People from India come from all over India. Gujarat, Kerala, Punjab. These are all very different regional cultures there and the common language used when communicating is English. We have never in our history had such an educated group of immigrants coming here as we do today. Lots of people have master’s degrees and phds from India and unfortunately aren’t able to use those degrees here.

People in 1820: Wow, Pierre. Look at all these men in kilts. Soon Canada will look like Scotland
1880: Wow, Fergus. Look at all these Germans. Canada is turning into Berlin
1950: Look at all these Dutch immigrants, Otto. Soon Canada will be Amsterdam
1970: Look at all these Jamaican immigrants, Dirk. Soon Canada will be like Montego Bay
And so on it goes.
Maybe not for the others but in terms of what Pierre was noticing, most of the previously very French Canada he knew did in fact end up becoming quite Scottish.
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Old 02-12-2024, 08:44 AM
 
1,224 posts, read 496,993 times
Reputation: 760
I have to say though, I am thankful for the opportunity to have lived in a rural area. I feel it helped my integration into Canada alot. I am not sure I would have the same appreciation for Canada had we moved directly to a bigger city where the temptation to stick to your own is all too often what happens.

I used to complain about it as a kid, now that I am older I am really thankful for the experience. I wouldn't move there again, but it was a good experience overall.
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