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Old 10-21-2012, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,844,393 times
Reputation: 924

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I didn't say they will; I said it remains to be seen. If my generation's kids decide they want to stay in the city, and are willing to fight for better educational opportunities for their kids (our grandkids!) and reverse the trend, again, more power to 'em. I'd like nothing better than to see improvements in public school systems, for all kids.
Gotcha, I appreciate the clarification.
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Old 10-21-2012, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,844,393 times
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Quote:
While these are extreme examples of the recent reversal, city gains and suburban downturns are evident in all parts of the country, including the Northeast and Midwest
This is the case for New York, Philadelphia, Kansas City, and Columbus. In Chicago, Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Rochester, and Minneapolis-St Paul, city declines in the 2000s turned to gains in 2010-2011. At the same time, the city declines of the 2000s lost momentum in 2010-2011 in Detroit, Cleveland, Buffalo, St Louis, and Cincinnati.
From the Brooking Institute link.
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Old 10-21-2012, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,791 posts, read 7,376,889 times
Reputation: 4329
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Maybe it's more jobs than lifestyle; I don't know for sure because I'm no longer in my 20s, and when I was I was working for small-town newspapers. The availability of work was more important than a big-city lifestyle, and my work was in small towns and suburbs.

And with that expensive cost of living does come a higher salary; that I do know for sure.


I didn't say they will; I said it remains to be seen. If my generation's kids decide they want to stay in the city, and are willing to fight for better educational opportunities for their kids (our grandkids!) and reverse the trend, again, more power to 'em. I'd like nothing better than to see improvements in public school systems, for all kids.
I just visited salary.com and looked at the average salary for my job in both Youngstown, and NYC. (don't know if that's the best source for this kind of comparison, or not) I could expect a 20% increase in my income, if I found an equivalent job in NYC. I don't think I could find a 900 s.f. 3 bedroom dwelling for $780/mo. in NYC. While that may seem extreme, I did the same thing for Chicago, with similar results.
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Old 10-21-2012, 05:26 PM
 
Location: In a happy place
3,711 posts, read 6,600,836 times
Reputation: 7344
Quote:
Originally Posted by CinciFan View Post
^Welcome bjimmy!

And KjBrill, are you seriously saying that if I walk up to some young city resident and ask them why they live in the city, they will tell me it's because they fear for the future? What a hilariously absurd statement. I, just like many others on this forum, live in the city because we prefer cities to suburbs. End of story.
And there are people who prefer suburbs to the cities.

And there are people who prefer rural areas to either one.

Isn't this a wonderful country that we can choose the area that best suits us?
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Old 10-21-2012, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,368 posts, read 57,591,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
I just visited salary.com and looked at the average salary for my job in both Youngstown, and NYC. (don't know if that's the best source for this kind of comparison, or not) I could expect a 20% increase in my income, if I found an equivalent job in NYC. I don't think I could find a 900 s.f. 3 bedroom dwelling for $780/mo. in NYC. While that may seem extreme, I did the same thing for Chicago, with similar results.
And I experienced the same when I moved to Philadelphia; despite a pretty decent increase in salary, the comparable Cape Cod that I sold for $95,000 in Madisonville cost more than twice that here. So while I am indeed earning more money, there are still economic compromises I have to make. But ... overall, salaries are still higher; alas, they don't go as far as the lower salaries in lower cost-of-living locations.
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Old 10-21-2012, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,844,393 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
I just visited salary.com and looked at the average salary for my job in both Youngstown, and NYC. (don't know if that's the best source for this kind of comparison, or not) I could expect a 20% increase in my income, if I found an equivalent job in NYC. I don't think I could find a 900 s.f. 3 bedroom dwelling for $780/mo. in NYC. While that may seem extreme, I did the same thing for Chicago, with similar results.
A three bedroom in NYC, in the outer boroughs, will cost upwards of $2,000 per month. And that would be on the rock bottom end of things.

new york apts by owner classifieds - craigslist

A person would find things more affordable in Philly. But if you do find a row house for $800 it's likely in a really bad area. Such as Point Breeze in South Philly.

http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/s...sk=&bedrooms=3

Taxes, insurance, food, and utilities will also run a lot higher. Cincinnati is bargain basement in comparison. And I get a good many of the amenities that these larger cities have. Honestly, I think some folks don't realize all Cincy has going for it.
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Old 10-21-2012, 05:47 PM
 
1,556 posts, read 1,472,011 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomJones123 View Post
I know some on CD forums who do that. What does that have to do with multiple links from various sources showing the same trend? Is it a conspiracy? Do I smell a straw man logic fallacy brewing with you?
You've linked to the Huffington Post, San Franciso's newspaper, and the New York Times all selling a certain belief system. Please understand the people who don't buy into this belief system don't view them as credible sources.....and many won't read their product.
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Old 10-21-2012, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 531,643 times
Reputation: 275
Quote:
Denver is an example of a growing city that has a growing trend of parents choosing to utilize public schools. Again, no doubt some will opt for private schools, charter schools, or suburbs. But to make the case that cities will empty out once their kids start school is inconsistent with reality.

Denver Public Schools Has Fastest-Growing Enrollment Of Urban School Districts In Country
Chicago is also making strides, though its got a long hard battle ahead of itself:
http://www.chicagobusiness.com/artic...E01/303249977/


Cincinnati's scores are improving btw, mainly due to a private public partnership surprisingly similar to 3CDC. Still got a long way to go in terms of perceptions and the preferences of people in the region though.
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Old 10-21-2012, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
4,007 posts, read 4,844,393 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flashes1 View Post
YPlease understand the people who don't buy into this belief system don't view them as credible sources.....and many won't read their product.
So is Brookings full of it to?

For the record, when I googled the subject, I could have just as easily linked to FoxNews.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/06/28...stimates-show/

I grabbed the links at random.
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Old 10-21-2012, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
477 posts, read 531,643 times
Reputation: 275
flashes: Read a mix of sources - Huff Post NPR NYTimes for left - the Economist and Fox News for Right (though the Economist is pretty centrist-libertarian these days). You sometimes need to challenge your own assumptions.
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