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Old 12-17-2011, 09:30 AM
 
6 posts, read 12,387 times
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I have posted on here a few times and really appreciate everyones advice in the past. Can anyone answer this question? There is a supposed "Nursing Shortage" in the US, however, new grads are finding a hard time landing their first jobs. I graduated in August with my Nursing Degree and still cannot get called for an interview. I walked into one hospital and the Nurse Recruiter told me to specifically go home and apply to these two certain jobs and she she will see what she can do. I went home and applied for these jobs, 3 minutes after applying, I recieved an e-mail saying they were sorry but could not accept new grads, they need people with experience. I have worked as an LVN for 15 month prior to graduating with my RN. Then a recruiter e-mails me and tells me about Memorial Hospital, Penrose Hospital Hiring new grads. I applied and they e-mailed me saying that "Although we have not hired yet for this position, other applicants meet more closely to the elgibility requirements, we are no longer taking your application into consideration." (I met all qualifications) I have applied at 281 postions and not 1 interview. I have my ADN and within 6 months from my BSN, 15 months LVN experience, 4.0 GPA, President/Dean's List, BLS Certified. I left Texas in August and moved to Denver because my husband is military and he was transferred here. He is getting ready to retire and we planned on living here, I think it may not work out if I cannot get a job. Does anyone have any advice on RN New grads getting a job in this state?
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Old 12-17-2011, 10:25 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,091,437 times
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There are still far too many nursing grads looking for the limited number of jobs available in Colorado. One factor that is increasingly tightening the job market is that so many people in Colorado are now postponing or outright canceling any non-necessary medical procedures (and even routine preventitive exams, etc.) because of the rotten economy. Pile onto that the fact that most employers are either cutting back on the level of health insurance coverage provided to their employees, raising the employee's cost of employer-provided health insurance, or just stopping provision of health insurance altogether, and you have built in a long-term decline in demand for health care services.

Not many years ago, Colorado nursing grads could pick from offers from several employers--now, even those local grads are having trouble finding jobs.

This goes to the central point that I have been making about the Colorado economy for some time now--and one that I know prospective residents do not want to hear: Unless you have outstanding credentials or experience, or are willing to work for a subsistence wage, you are not going to compete well with the many, many long-time Colorado residents currently looking for jobs in this foul economy. Simply put, Coloradans already here have better contacts, local employment records, established residency, more local ties and roots--all of that makes them more attractive, other factors being equal, than hiring someone that lacks those local connections. That was true when Colorado "busted" in the early 1980's and it's proving true again. And, contrary to the wishful thinking of the pumpmonkeys, Colorado's economy is still in big trouble and is likely to remain that way for a protracted period.
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Old 12-17-2011, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,958 posts, read 98,776,620 times
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Well, I have a slightly different take on the nursing job situation here, having lived here 30 years and worked in nursing most of that time.

Even back in the early 80's, when there was a nationwide shortage of nurses, nurse recruiters here in the Denver area were saying the shortage in CO was "not that bad". Many people are constantly moving here. A lot of these people are nurses. There are lots of applicants for every job, and always have been. There was never a time in the past 30 years when nursing grads could pick from several employers. It's not just me, many of my nursing friends have said the same.

I'm not sure local connections are *that* important unless you are looking for a job that likes to hire friends of its own employees. That is more the case in dr's offices and small employers. It's how I got my latest job. Nursing jobs do not pay "subsistence wages"; even the office where I work has a pay scale. Hospitals tend to be even more rigid, so much per hour depending on qualifications. You can look up Denver Health's job openings and see the pay scales. (They seem to be the only ones that actually post salaries.)

As to the OP, even though you have an LVN, you are still considere a new grad RN. I know it is difficult for new grads to find jobs, though most do eventually. I would advise concentrating on getting the BSN, and then go job hunting again. You may have to start in a nursing home, or take some sort of part time and/or "temp" job to begin with. Try to cultivate some friends who already have nursing jobs. They can clue you in to openings with their empoyers.
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Old 12-17-2011, 02:24 PM
 
106 posts, read 331,484 times
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In most places these days, there is no nursing shortage. In very rural areas there can be but for the majority of the US that is not the case. Nursing schools are plentiful and graduates from those schools are many, add in that many nurses that were part time or per diem increased their hours and now there are numerous experienced nurses eager to work. New grad costs a hospital a lot of money to train, I've seen the number of 80K floated around before a new grad starts to actually make money for a hospital on all nurses.com. As you have discovered LVN experience doesn't count, they want an RN that is ready to be running from day 1. Some places will train a new grad but many choose not to simply because they do not have to with a stack of very experienced RN resumes on their desk. Denver is a poor market for a new grad to enter, or so I hear. Keep trying, a few months is not that long, I've heard of it taking much longer to land a new grad job. And don't be picky, nursing homes or doc offices will often hire more new grads. It might be that you have to work at a facility you do npot want to just to gain experience.
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Old 12-17-2011, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Bend, OR
3,296 posts, read 8,196,177 times
Reputation: 3316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Well, I have a slightly different take on the nursing job situation here, having lived here 30 years and worked in nursing most of that time.

Even back in the early 80's, when there was a nationwide shortage of nurses, nurse recruiters here in the Denver area were saying the shortage in CO was "not that bad". Many people are constantly moving here. A lot of these people are nurses. There are lots of applicants for every job, and always have been. There was never a time in the past 30 years when nursing grads could pick from several employers. It's not just me, many of my nursing friends have said the same.

I'm not sure local connections are *that* important unless you are looking for a job that likes to hire friends of its own employees. That is more the case in dr's offices and small employers. It's how I got my latest job. Nursing jobs do not pay "subsistence wages"; even the office where I work has a pay scale. Hospitals tend to be even more rigid, so much per hour depending on qualifications. You can look up Denver Health's job openings and see the pay scales. (They seem to be the only ones that actually post salaries.)

As to the OP, even though you have an LVN, you are still considere a new grad RN. I know it is difficult for new grads to find jobs, though most do eventually. I would advise concentrating on getting the BSN, and then go job hunting again. You may have to start in a nursing home, or take some sort of part time and/or "temp" job to begin with. Try to cultivate some friends who already have nursing jobs. They can clue you in to openings with their empoyers.
My husband didn't have a problem getting a nursing position in Colorado when he graduated with his BSN back in 2003. I'm not sure if that was because Grand Junction was still experiencing a boom in their economy, or the fact that he also had a bachelor's degree in science with a minor in anatomy and neurobiology, or the fact that he's male, but he was able to land in the ICU at the large hospital. Most of his cohort also landed jobs right away, not all of them in Grand Junction.

Like others have said, keep applying but focus on your BSN. I think when employers look at applications right now, all things being equal, they are going to hire the BSN over the LVN. Also, have you actually gone to each of the hospitals you've applied to and spoken with the nurse recruiter? Take a tour of the hospital, meet some of the nurses on the unit, and show your interest. Get contact names and emails for the positions you are applying for. Send a few emails expressing your interest and availability. Every single hospital my husband has worked for, he did this first. When they are sifting through stacks of applications, recognizing your name could be the difference between hiring you or another person.
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Old 12-17-2011, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Burlington, Colorado
347 posts, read 689,184 times
Reputation: 485
There are lots of nursing jobs in Eastern CO. It may not help if your tied to Denver, but we have several adds in the paper every week. Some are nursing home jobs, but the Wray and Limon hospitals are hiring too I believe. I guess folks would rather be unemployed on the front range than live out this way. Limon may be commutable a few days a week though

Job Opportunities (http://lincolncommunityhospitalandnursinghome.com/JobOpp.aspx - broken link)

Career Opportunities
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Old 12-17-2011, 11:42 PM
 
12,842 posts, read 24,468,229 times
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I noticed in my own graduating class (years ago, when there was really a shortage in most places) the guys got job offers as new grads that the women just didn't get, like ER or other critical specialties. Now, I don't think that would happen that way these days, and the guys were good, but so were the women, and the guys really got a break.
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Old 12-17-2011, 11:53 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,958 posts, read 98,776,620 times
Reputation: 31371
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
I noticed in my own graduating class (years ago, when there was really a shortage in most places) the guys got job offers as new grads that the women just didn't get, like ER or other critical specialties. Now, I don't think that would happen that way these days, and the guys were good, but so were the women, and the guys really got a break.
I think that still happens in nursing.
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Old 12-18-2011, 08:16 PM
 
10 posts, read 39,783 times
Reputation: 13
I know from speaking to people in my own graduating class, that the people who knew someone or completed their preceptorship at whatever Denver metro area hospital were more likely to get the job.

OP, if your husband is military you have a much better chance at getting hired on at a federal facility. I would check out veterans affairs and military hospitals in CO.

I graduated in June, then went to volunteer (non-nursing) until Oct. When I got back into town and started to seriously apply for new grad positions in Colorado, I had the same problems as the OP. Then I started to expand my search to places where I could work with the compact licence. I received a call back for an interview in NM right away, and was offered that job after the interview. I also looked on usajobs.gov and am in the process of being hired with IHS. I am still going to live in CO, just in another part
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Old 12-19-2011, 06:19 AM
 
Location: Canon City, Colorado
1,331 posts, read 4,413,601 times
Reputation: 675
Colorado Department of Corrections has many nursing jobs posted. Just a thought.
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