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Old 03-13-2012, 12:43 PM
 
Location: WV and Eastport, ME
11,748 posts, read 11,315,152 times
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OK, Tek. I stated my opinions before, and I generally say when my post is an opinion.

OTOH, it is a fact that a 32-bit operating system will never use 4GB of RAM.
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Old 03-13-2012, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
3,685 posts, read 8,499,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mensaguy View Post
OK, Tek. I stated my opinions before, and I generally say when my post is an opinion.

OTOH, it is a fact that a 32-bit operating system will never use 4GB of RAM.
Actually, you're completely wrong on that. Certain 32-bit server versions of Windows, and 32-bit Mac OS X both utilize the PAE feature on x86 processors to address far more memory than 4GB. 32-bit Mac OS X upper limit is 32GB I believe. It's either 16GB or 32GB.

What is true is that desktop versions of 32-bit Windows operating systems cannot use 4GB of RAM, and that the virtual address size of a 32-bit process cannot exceed 4GB.
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Old 03-13-2012, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,955 posts, read 17,978,934 times
Reputation: 7193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asheville Native View Post
Is this your way of apologizing for giving erroneous information to a novice asking for help.
In the military we were taught never to apologize, back up, quit, or otherwise surrender to those that oppose us using dis-information. I remember this lesson well.
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Old 03-13-2012, 06:07 PM
 
28,638 posts, read 40,617,860 times
Reputation: 37346
Quote:
Originally Posted by MediocreButArrogant View Post
Actually, you're completely wrong on that. Certain 32-bit server versions of Windows, and 32-bit Mac OS X both utilize the PAE feature on x86 processors to address far more memory than 4GB. 32-bit Mac OS X upper limit is 32GB I believe. It's either 16GB or 32GB.

What is true is that desktop versions of 32-bit Windows operating systems cannot use 4GB of RAM, and that the virtual address size of a 32-bit process cannot exceed 4GB.
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Old 03-13-2012, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
3,685 posts, read 8,499,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Actually, if you think any of what I wrote is wrong, you are just demonstrating your ignorance. If you'd like me to educate you on virtual addressing vs physical addressing, MMUs, page tables, and translation lookaside buffers to show you how this is possible, I'd be happy to, except it is likely all over your head.

Perhaps the tables on the following page:

Physical Address Extension - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

are simple enough for you to understand.

Or perhaps this:

Physical Address Extension (PAE) is a processor feature that enables x86 processors to access more than 4 GB of physical memory on capable versions of Windows. Certain 32-bit versions of Windows Server running on x86-based systems can use PAE to access up to 64 GB or 128 GB of physical memory, depending on the physical address size of the processor. For details, see Memory Limits for Windows Releases.

which can be found at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa366796.aspx
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Old 03-13-2012, 10:43 PM
 
16,308 posts, read 25,271,830 times
Reputation: 8302
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandpa Pipes View Post
In the military we were taught never to apologize, back up, quit, or otherwise surrender to those that oppose us using dis-information. I remember this lesson well.
Doesn't do a thing to make your appear smarter, or right.

Wrong and proud of it is nothing to be proud of.
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Old 03-13-2012, 11:02 PM
 
16,308 posts, read 25,271,830 times
Reputation: 8302
Quote:
Originally Posted by MediocreButArrogant View Post
Actually, you're completely wrong on that. Certain 32-bit server versions of Windows, and 32-bit Mac OS X both utilize the PAE feature on x86 processors to address far more memory than 4GB. 32-bit Mac OS X upper limit is 32GB I believe. It's either 16GB or 32GB.

What is true is that desktop versions of 32-bit Windows operating systems cannot use 4GB of RAM, and that the virtual address size of a 32-bit process cannot exceed 4GB.
Why do people insist on muddying the waters when a novice asks for some basic help.

The OP clearly stated they have a Dell 8400 and are running XP SP3.
A Dell 8400 motherboard supports ONLY 4GB of RAM, and XP supports only 4GB of RAM, but will recognize only 3.5GB of RAM.

It is really a disservice, and is not the purpose of these threads where people can ask for help. Wrong information and irrelevant tangents do nothing to impress anyone, and leave many of us going......
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Old 03-13-2012, 11:06 PM
 
16,308 posts, read 25,271,830 times
Reputation: 8302
Quote:
Originally Posted by MediocreButArrogant View Post
Actually, if you think any of what I wrote is wrong, you are just demonstrating your ignorance. If you'd like me to educate you on virtual addressing vs physical addressing, MMUs, page tables, and translation lookaside buffers to show you how this is possible, I'd be happy to, except it is likely all over your head.

Perhaps the tables on the following page:

Physical Address Extension - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

are simple enough for you to understand.

Or perhaps this:

Physical Address Extension (PAE) is a processor feature that enables x86 processors to access more than 4 GB of physical memory on capable versions of Windows. Certain 32-bit versions of Windows Server running on x86-based systems can use PAE to access up to 64 GB or 128 GB of physical memory, depending on the physical address size of the processor. For details, see Memory Limits for Windows Releases.

which can be found at Physical Address Extension (Windows)
And this helps the OP how. If you stick 8 or 16 GB in her Dell 8400, it probably won't even POST.

Yep, you have impressed some here, problem is you have failed to make a positive impression.
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Old 03-14-2012, 07:21 AM
 
Location: WV and Eastport, ME
11,748 posts, read 11,315,152 times
Reputation: 7707
Quote:
Originally Posted by MediocreButArrogant View Post
Actually, if you think any of what I wrote is wrong, you are just demonstrating your ignorance. If you'd like me to educate you on virtual addressing vs physical addressing, MMUs, page tables, and translation lookaside buffers to show you how this is possible, I'd be happy to, except it is likely all over your head.

Perhaps the tables on the following page:

Physical Address Extension - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

are simple enough for you to understand.

Or perhaps this:

Physical Address Extension (PAE) is a processor feature that enables x86 processors to access more than 4 GB of physical memory on capable versions of Windows. Certain 32-bit versions of Windows Server running on x86-based systems can use PAE to access up to 64 GB or 128 GB of physical memory, depending on the physical address size of the processor. For details, see Memory Limits for Windows Releases.

which can be found at Physical Address Extension (Windows)
Big deal. The question does not deal with anybody running Server Edition. It is a simple Dell PC under question here.

(Opinion alert: Your name does indeed fit.)

The fact of the matter is that a 32-bit operating system can address no more than 4,294,967,296 bytes of memory. Out of the the BIOS ROM must be subtracted as well as the NVM that contains the CMOS settings. Then the hardware interrupt addresses must be reserved as as the ROM contained on video cards, controllers, etc. Therefore, practical advice for this user (which is what most of us try to provide [I'm thinking of Tek, Ashe, NHDave, Turco, NeilVA, and a few others]) is to save his money, add 2 GB to the 1GB he has, and enjoy the noticeable performance imporvement until the time comes to replace the computer.

There have been systems around since the 286 processor days that would permit some systems to access memory in excess of the normal maximum. That, in no way, makes it practical for most normal, everyday people to use it in common computing tasks.

Statements like this are about as useful as telling someone coming here with problems they need to overclock their processor.
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Old 03-14-2012, 07:41 AM
 
28,638 posts, read 40,617,860 times
Reputation: 37346


Stills seems to be a fitting comment. I was just trying to be succinct. Other posters have filled in the rest of my post for me.

Thanks, fellas!!
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