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Old 08-05-2017, 03:05 PM
 
1,672 posts, read 543,813 times
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The same agency says cell phones are possibly carcinogenic, as is being a fry cook.

Go ahead folks, and use natural, organic approaches. Don't forget to dig it out by hand when nothing kills it, and don't forget the roots.
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Old 08-05-2017, 03:18 PM
 
1,447 posts, read 782,999 times
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Looks a bit more like poison oak to me. Poison ivy leaf edges are smoother.

No matter which it is, it needs to be eradicated carefully.

I'm just getting over systemic poison ivy after being non-allergic the rest of my life. I could wade through fields of the stuff. This time, one leaf brushed against my leg and it went nuts. There wasn't an inch of me that didn't itch maddeningly for two weeks although, thank goodness, the rash stayed on my legs and one arm.
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Old 08-05-2017, 03:38 PM
Status: "?" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Minnesota
195 posts, read 34,784 times
Reputation: 268
I agree with a previous poster it looks more like poison oak than poison ivy. In the fall poison ivy turns a beautiful deep red. It has more than 3 leaves on the stem, poison ivy only has 3 typically. Also poison ivy usually has a oily sheen.

I got poison ivy Rash in the summer while camping, four months later used the same sleeping bag in the middle of winter (Minnesota) and got poison ivy Rash from the un-washed sleeping bag. It's the oil on the plant leaves that are the problem. Also, never burn poison ivy, oak, sumac. Breathing in the smoke can send you to the hospital.

Goats can eat it and love it.
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Old 08-05-2017, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
36,923 posts, read 39,558,327 times
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OP you have Poison Oak...not ivy.

Poison Oak


Poison Ivy


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Old 08-05-2017, 04:18 PM
 
Location: NC
5,168 posts, read 5,340,224 times
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Nice photos, but they actually show it is poison ivy.

However, poison ivy is not an ivy. And poison oak is not an oak. They are both in the same genus, so very closely related. Toxicodendron. Same herbicides work on both.
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Old 08-05-2017, 06:00 PM
 
Location: United States of America
1,825 posts, read 2,178,722 times
Reputation: 3302
Used in yards, farms and parks throughout the world, Roundup has long been a top-selling weed killer. But now researchers have found that one of Roundup’s inert ingredients can kill human cells, particularly embryonic, placental and umbilical cord cells.


Until now, most health studies have focused on the safety of glyphosate, rather than the mixture of ingredients found in Roundup. But in the new study, scientists found that Roundup’s inert ingredients amplified the toxic effect on human cells—even at concentrations much more diluted than those used on farms and lawns.
One specific inert ingredient, polyethoxylated tallowamine, or POEA, was more deadly to human embryonic, placental and umbilical cord cells than the herbicide itself – a finding the researchers call “astonishing.”


https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...g-herbicide-p/
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Old 08-05-2017, 06:16 PM
 
Location: NC
5,168 posts, read 5,340,224 times
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So the pre-2009 study was done with delicate cells growing in a petri dish. They applied high concentrations of commercial herbicide and the cells were injured. Surprise, surprise. POEA is an animal fat/waxy soap and was in the commercial solution so that when the correct dilution was used the herbicide would stick on the leaves. There are 'studies' like this done from time to time by researchers who want desperately to find something wrong with Roundup and the company that created it. So far all those studies have been flawed, like this one that uses crazy high concentrations of something and very delicate exposed cells growing in a petri dish. The important thing to notice is that the herbicide itself did no such damage. Eight plus years later, we can still safely get rid of our poison ivy.
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Old 08-05-2017, 06:33 PM
 
Location: near a beach
14,650 posts, read 13,719,737 times
Reputation: 22542
That first picture didn't look like poison ivy to me but if everyone says so, I guess it must be.

I had it growing through the spaces in between the boards in the deck a few years ago but it was three pointy reddish leaves. I did buy Round Up for it because there isn't much worse than getting poison ivy. I didn't want it to spread, didn't want our dog to scrape against it and spread it around either.

The Round Up worked. I really hated buying a terrible poison like that and it's been stuck in a closet ever since--I don't use poisons but against poison ivy coming up right through the deck, that was worth it.
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Old 08-05-2017, 08:04 PM
 
3,557 posts, read 1,200,695 times
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Looking at some images it seems as if this is EASTERN Poison Ivy. Poison Oak has a more 'scalloped' or rounded serrated edge.
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Old 08-05-2017, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Niagara Region
1,129 posts, read 1,101,686 times
Reputation: 3590
I'm wondering if what you have there is a Box Elder seedling.
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