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Old 07-28-2010, 03:45 PM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,585,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsteelers247 View Post
Sure you can. I have been traveling to the mountains around Southern California for the last 19 years, and having gone there in 6th grade for "science camp", I was informed of this. Maybe someone who is ignorant and doesn't know much about flora would see your point of view.
I'm fairly familiar with different species of trees and am able to identify them. I've taken numerous trips through the San Bernardino National Forest and Angeles National Forest and have hiked through the region. On average, your typical ONE-TWO ACRE area will only have anywhere from TWO to FOUR species of trees within its space. As I have stated, there are OTHER types of trees, only that they are often in OTHER areas, in which one of the trees in the other spot may or may not be present.

On the other hand, in the southern Appalachians, in a one to two acre area, one can often spot up to TEN or GREATER species of trees. Western forests cannot match the diversity of plant life, including trees, that are found within a square acre. They simply can't.
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Old 07-28-2010, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Westminster/Huntington Beach, CA
1,780 posts, read 1,248,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
I'm fairly familiar with different species of trees and am able to identify them. I've taken numerous trips through the San Bernardino National Forest and Angeles National Forest and have hiked through the region. On average, your typical ONE-TWO ACRE area will only have anywhere from TWO to FOUR species of trees within its space. As I have stated, there are OTHER types of trees, only that they are often in OTHER areas, in which one of the trees in the other spot may or may not be present.

On the other hand, in the southern Appalachians, in a one to two acre area, one can often spot up to TEN or GREATER species of trees. Western forests cannot match the diversity of plant life, including trees, that are found within a square acre. They simply can't.
Ok, i guess it doesn't really matter to me anymore I stated that eastern forests are all similar to me.
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Old 07-28-2010, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Colorado
2,561 posts, read 5,029,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
I'm fairly familiar with different species of trees and am able to identify them. I've taken numerous trips through the San Bernardino National Forest and Angeles National Forest and have hiked through the region. On average, your typical ONE-TWO ACRE area will only have anywhere from TWO to FOUR species of trees within its space. As I have stated, there are OTHER types of trees, only that they are often in OTHER areas, in which one of the trees in the other spot may or may not be present.

On the other hand, in the southern Appalachians, in a one to two acre area, one can often spot up to TEN or GREATER species of trees. Western forests cannot match the diversity of plant life, including trees, that are found within a square acre. They simply can't.
There is much more divirsity of landscape and tree variety in Northern California where giant redwoods grow. San Bernadino has much more of an arid climate as does Angeles. If you head up towards Crescent City and surrounding areas you will see an abundance of lush flora. Rainfall amounts are often double and sometimes triple that of areas you mention. Northern California and Orgeon has amazing forests by anyone's standards.

Last edited by Scott5280; 07-28-2010 at 04:17 PM..
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Old 07-28-2010, 06:17 PM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,585,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott5280 View Post
There is much more divirsity of landscape and tree variety in Northern California where giant redwoods grow. San Bernadino has much more of an arid climate as does Angeles. If you head up towards Crescent City and surrounding areas you will see an abundance of lush flora. Rainfall amounts are often double and sometimes triple that of areas you mention. Northern California and Orgeon has amazing forests by anyone's standards.
Sure, the Pacific Northwest would, as parts of it are temperate rainforest.

I should have clarified with southwest as opposed to the entire west.
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Old 07-28-2010, 06:45 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,150 posts, read 9,934,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott5280 View Post
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Wow, look at Georgia and Alabama. Lots of forests for their size.

Btw, some of the states are missing, most notably to me, Maine.

Last edited by Yac; 08-20-2010 at 06:18 AM..
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Old 07-28-2010, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
705 posts, read 1,444,848 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
I'm fairly familiar with different species of trees and am able to identify them. I've taken numerous trips through the San Bernardino National Forest and Angeles National Forest and have hiked through the region. On average, your typical ONE-TWO ACRE area will only have anywhere from TWO to FOUR species of trees within its space. As I have stated, there are OTHER types of trees, only that they are often in OTHER areas, in which one of the trees in the other spot may or may not be present.

On the other hand, in the southern Appalachians, in a one to two acre area, one can often spot up to TEN or GREATER species of trees. Western forests cannot match the diversity of plant life, including trees, that are found within a square acre. They simply can't.
You have posted nothing to lead us to believe your correct, sorry.
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Old 07-30-2010, 07:53 AM
 
47 posts, read 186,977 times
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I read once that there are more species of trees in the smoky mountains than there are in all of Europe.
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Old 07-30-2010, 09:07 AM
 
104 posts, read 220,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Wow, look at Georgia and Alabama. Lots of forests for their size.

Btw, some of the states are missing, most notably to me, Maine.
Alabama has some odd property taxes. I'm not quite sure how it works, but it taxes on land use, which makes timber farming popular.
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Old 07-30-2010, 10:58 AM
 
Location: A Land Not So Far Away
3,969 posts, read 2,823,243 times
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Mississippi.
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Old 08-11-2010, 08:24 PM
 
147 posts, read 315,158 times
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I find it somewhat odd that there's a pissing contest over who has better forests, but isn't California known for having the most unique species of plants and animals of anywhere in the United States? As for which forests I prefer, I wouldn't say I prefer one type over the other. I loved hiking around Rainier in Washington and the Sequoia National Forest in California as much as hiking in the Adirondacks in New York. I even liked hiking in the high desert of Eastern Washington despite all these types of climate and geography being different. That's one of the great things about having such a large country.
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