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Old 03-27-2012, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Mississippi Delta!
469 posts, read 603,013 times
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The cuisine of Italy differs greatly from region to region. The cooking of some regions is hard to find in the United States. For example, how many Italian American restaurants serve true Sicilian cuisine, with caponata (a sweet/sour eggplant appetizer) and pasta alla sarde (pasta with sardines) on the menu?

Sicilian cuisine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Or Alto-Adige, with its strong Austrian influence?

Italian cuisine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

God bless,

CKB
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Old 03-27-2012, 04:14 PM
 
14,752 posts, read 28,638,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Balducci View Post
The cuisine of Italy differs greatly from region to region. The cooking of some regions is hard to find in the United States. For example, how many Italian American restaurants serve true Sicilian cuisine, with caponata (a sweet/sour eggplant appetizer) and pasta alla sarde (pasta with sardines) on the menu?

Or Alto-Adige, with its strong Austrian influence?
Ok, since we're here, I personally think that you will find regional Italian foods in (1) someone's home, if in the US, or (2) in that region of Italy. You will find authentic REGIONAL Italian food in a very savvy avant-garde Italian restaurant, and I'm not talking New California cuisine with an Italian twist (that's fake). A restauranteur runs the risk that the typical American may not accept the dish because it's not clearly identifiable as mainstream Italian.

Italy's gastronomic capital and region are reputedly Bologna and Emilia-Romagna, respectively.

The regional foods of Italy are outstanding. Sicilian seafood dishes might feature delicious recipes with swordfish, and arancine are among the tastiest "slam dunks" anywhere. The only thing I will not eat is anything with eggplant, so throw out Pasta alla Norma. I was once in Bolzano, which also speaks German, and was hunting around for lunch. I had a skillet with an awesome turkey breast, roasted potates and spinach that was outstanding. Polenta is also a tasty side dish, and can be topped with mushrooms or sauce.

How Italians (in Italy) are mostly of thin or average build is beyond me.

Last edited by robertpolyglot; 03-27-2012 at 05:15 PM..
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Old 03-27-2012, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Newcastle, NSW, Australia
72 posts, read 106,319 times
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I didn't even think there were Italians in the state of Iowa until I heard of this woman:

Dina Manfredini isn't just the oldest in her parish, she's among the oldest in the world at age 114

And she's been living there for many decades.
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Old 03-27-2012, 09:55 PM
 
14,752 posts, read 28,638,351 times
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Originally Posted by shawarma View Post
I didn't even think there were Italians in the state of Iowa until I heard of this woman:

Dina Manfredini isn't just the oldest in her parish, she's among the oldest in the world at age 114

And she's been living there for many decades.
Oh, no, not another one on the list. That's right. South Des Moines, IA was once an Italian neighborhood.
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Old 03-27-2012, 10:05 PM
 
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there's actually a decent amount in Memphis. A lot of the most well-known, wealthy families are of Italian-descent. We also have an Italian festival every June, it's one of the biggest events in the city.
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Old 03-28-2012, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Mississippi Delta!
469 posts, read 603,013 times
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Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
there's actually a decent amount in Memphis. A lot of the most well-known, wealthy families are of Italian-descent. We also have an Italian festival every June, it's one of the biggest events in the city.
That's right - the Grisantis come to mind right away. Also the Montesis.
The festival is at Holy Rosary Catholic Church.

God bless,

CKB
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Old 03-28-2012, 03:08 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,010,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Balducci View Post
That's right - the Grisantis come to mind right away. Also the Montesis.
The festival is at Holy Rosary Catholic Church.

God bless,

CKB
yea the Gristantis, Montesis, and Lucchesis are all well-known families. There are some other ones, but I cant think of them right now. I guess the Garbaldis are up there too because of the restaurant.

The area around Holy Rosary (East Memphis) has a lot of Italians. It's the Catholic/Jewish part of Memphis.
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Old 04-01-2013, 11:18 PM
 
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It wasn't easy being a Sicilian American growing up in Kentucky, where your either White or black.. Nothing in between. Kids and still people this day (I'm 35) asking me "what are you" I look and act different from most people I've encountered through life, I'm used to it now but still I would love to be around people that are like me.. I guess I should be in new York or something.
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Old 04-02-2013, 12:01 AM
 
522 posts, read 490,424 times
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Valdese, North Carolina was apparently settled by a mix of Northern Italians and Southern French of the Waldensian faith. (Northern Italians are sometimes a bit culturally different than Southern Italians though) Although the site lists their current Italian-American population as just 5.8%.

Valdese North Carolina
http://www.city-data.com/city/Valdes...-Carolina.html

Follansbee, West Virginia is plurality Italian with a population that's listed as 34.7% Italian. It's on the border of Ohio though so possibly "nearly Midwestern."

http://www.city-data.com/city/Follan...-Virginia.html

Reportedly Daphne, Alabama was once fairly Italian although now it looks to be under 5%.

Daphne celebrates Italian roots with festival | al.com
http://www.city-data.com/city/Daphne-Alabama.html
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Old 04-02-2013, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Denver
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New Orleans has the highest concentration of Sicilians outside of the island in the world.
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