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Old 06-26-2014, 11:10 AM
 
7,279 posts, read 13,534,138 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
You don't have to agree with us, but it couldn't hurt to at least try and walk a mile in our shoes. Maybe you'd be a little more understanding of why we feel the way we do.
I think that perspective-taking is always a good idea. I think it's good to be cognizant of how someone else may feel in a given circumstance. I would also encourage those who would have gay marriage banned to be equally open to walking a mile in the shoes of those who would be directly impacted by those bans.
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Old 06-26-2014, 02:26 PM
 
5,837 posts, read 10,793,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
I've reached the conclusion that the switch from analog to digital sound recording has helped "preserve" the sound of music, so to speak. Music from the 1980s sounds less dated today than music from the 1960s did in the 1980s.




The sexualization of pop culture did begin long before 2000, but it was around 2000 when it became blatantly shameless and disturbing. Go read the lyrics to "Oochie Wally" by QB Finest. That song was written and recorded in 2000, and got moderate Top 40 radio airplay in 2001. The lyrics made my skin crawl when I first read them, and quite frankly, I don't want to link to them because I don't want to read them again. "Oochie Wally" makes "Me So Horny" and "I Wanna Sex You Up" seem wholesome in comparison, yet somehow it was acceptable for Top 40 radio in 2001. Sex still sells plenty in the 2010s, but we're not getting slapped in the face by it like we were in the 2000s.




What the internet has done more than anything is enable escapism. You can put real life aside by spending all day playing "pretend" on the internet.




It makes me sad that the only choices we're given are neoliberal social engineering or the Christian equivalent of sharia law. I choose neither. How about common sense for a change?
Agreed on all accounts. Yes, some of the hip hop and R&B in the early 2000s might as well have been pornography. Which hey, there may be a place for that, but one should at least call it what it is and NOT call it "music".
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Old 06-26-2014, 02:28 PM
 
854 posts, read 1,114,637 times
Reputation: 963
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
Sexual dynamics have changed in general. Society seems more sexualized than it used to be. The rise of sex positive feminism has made the left much less puritanical.

I disagree. If anything, the sex-positive feminists seem more preachy than traditional feminism.
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Old 06-26-2014, 02:35 PM
 
5,837 posts, read 10,793,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
In 2000, my opinion that gay marriage should not be legal was about as mainstream and non-controversial -- and about as unquestioned -- as the opinion that puppies are cute and apple pie is yummy. Fourteen years later, my opinion hasn't changed . . . but expressing it could get me fired, and at the least would force me into "sensitivity training." The speed and the scale of this change has been nothing short of breathtaking.

And for those of you of the liberal bent who have posted comments disparaging conservatives for being uneasy about the pace and direction of societal change, imagine it going the other way. Suppose, in the space of a few years, alcohol was banned, homosexual acts were punishable by imprisonment, dancing was scorned, being seen going to a nightclub could cost you your job, the workday opened with mandatory prayers, white people were given explicit preference in college admissions and hiring decisions . . . and so on. How would you feel? I'll bet you'd be as unhappy with the social trends as conservatives are of the ones that are actually going on now.

You don't have to agree with us, but it couldn't hurt to at least try and walk a mile in our shoes. Maybe you'd be a little more understanding of why we feel the way we do.
Based on this post and last, I would think you are confusing 2000 with 1960. Even when I was going to Catholic church growing in the 80s, NO ONE would wear suits regularly. Only holidays, funerals, baptisms, etc. There have been other changes I've seen (positive IMO) but people haven't worn suits to church from what I've seen during my lifetime.

Unless you are in a very liberal part of the country, gay marriage not being legal being OK and mainstream and not getting in trouble is still dominant over much of the country.

I think the changes you've seen might be something that is different from the average the nation has seen.
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Old 06-26-2014, 04:15 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
1,172 posts, read 662,190 times
Reputation: 1741
Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
In 2000, my opinion that gay marriage should not be legal was about as mainstream and non-controversial -- and about as unquestioned -- as the opinion that puppies are cute and apple pie is yummy. Fourteen years later, my opinion hasn't changed . . . but expressing it could get me fired, and at the least would force me into "sensitivity training." The speed and the scale of this change has been nothing short of breathtaking.

And for those of you of the liberal bent who have posted comments disparaging conservatives for being uneasy about the pace and direction of societal change, imagine it going the other way. Suppose, in the space of a few years, alcohol was banned, homosexual acts were punishable by imprisonment, dancing was scorned, being seen going to a nightclub could cost you your job, the workday opened with mandatory prayers, white people were given explicit preference in college admissions and hiring decisions . . . and so on. How would you feel? I'll bet you'd be as unhappy with the social trends as conservatives are of the ones that are actually going on now.

You don't have to agree with us, but it couldn't hurt to at least try and walk a mile in our shoes. Maybe you'd be a little more understanding of why we feel the way we do.
You exaggerate. Try living in a world where you could be fired from your job for being gay, and if anybody knew you were gay your life was essentially over. You would be treated like crap, never hired for anything, and told you were nothing but worthless and going to hell. Thats what gay people have had to put up with for decades and still do in certain parts of the country.

It must be real hard for you to accept the fact that conservative Christians can no longer push everybody else around without consequence.
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Old 06-26-2014, 04:29 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,222 posts, read 17,972,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
It must be real hard for you to accept the fact that conservative Christians can no longer push everybody else around without consequence.
So now it's OK to push conservative Christians around? I'm hardly a devout Christian, and I don't necessarily oppose gay marriage either, but two wrongs don't make a right.
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Old 06-26-2014, 04:34 PM
 
4,668 posts, read 6,118,482 times
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I say daily life isn't much different from 2000.

We can talk about things like polarizing politics (which is actually nothing new), an increase in online dating, texting instead of calling, etc. etc..But daily life? I don't see how it's different.
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Old 06-26-2014, 04:38 PM
 
4,668 posts, read 6,118,482 times
Reputation: 5840
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
some of the hip hop and R&B in the early 2000s might as well have been pornography. Which hey, there may be a place for that, but one should at least call it what it is and NOT call it "music".

People said Elvis swinging his hips was pornography. People said Robert Plant was too sexual.

We take the times we live in too serious..Of course hip hop in the early 2000's was 'music'. No less music than 'Blue Suede Shoes' or 'The Lemon Song'.
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Old 06-26-2014, 05:27 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
1,172 posts, read 662,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
So now it's OK to push conservative Christians around? I'm hardly a devout Christian, and I don't necessarily oppose gay marriage either, but two wrongs don't make a right.
Not necessarily, but sometimes karma can be a real ***** that can come back to bite.
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Old 06-26-2014, 06:16 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,222 posts, read 17,972,432 times
Reputation: 14673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dport7674 View Post
People said Elvis swinging his hips was pornography. People said Robert Plant was too sexual.

We take the times we live in too serious..Of course hip hop in the early 2000's was 'music'. No less music than 'Blue Suede Shoes' or 'The Lemon Song'.
Of course, neither Elvis Presley nor Robert Plant told a woman to "deep-throat [their] nine-inch" in any of their songs, or boast about passing women around among their crew, like the rappers did in the song that I mentioned. There's a difference between provocative and perverted.
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