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Old 04-03-2018, 10:01 AM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
2,990 posts, read 2,148,258 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BPt111 View Post
Texas and Florida is among fastest growing states in country back in 2009 no one liked Texas or Florida now everyone both . How Texas and Florida became hotspots for people leaving Northeast ?
People didn't just start moving to Texas and Florida since 2009. If you look at the population increase each census WW2, you'll see that both Florida and Teaxas have been among the fastest growing states each decade.

In my opinion it's good roads, the invention of air conditioning, warm weather, jobs. All are major factors enticing so many people to move there.
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Old 04-03-2018, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,439 posts, read 11,944,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
People didn't just start moving to Texas and Florida since 2009. If you look at the population increase each census WW2, you'll see that both Florida and Teaxas have been among the fastest growing states each decade.

In my opinion it's good roads, the invention of air conditioning, warm weather, jobs. All are major factors enticing so many people to move there.
Traditionally speaking, Texas's growth has been driven by high birth rates and immigration, not domestic migration. Here are the latest figures for FL and TX:

Florida:
Born in state -35.9%
Born in Northeast - 17.1%
Born in Midwest - 10.5%
Born elsewhere in South - 10.5%
Born in West - 2.7%
U.S. citizens - born outside U.S. - 3.5% (includes Puerto Ricans)
Foreign born - 19.9%

Texas:
Born in state - 60.0%
Born in Northeast - 2.8%
Born in Midwest - 5.9%
Born elsewhere in South - 8.0%
Born in West - 5.2%
U.S. citizens - born outside U.S. - 1.4% (PR population negligible)
Foreign born - 16.7%

Because Texas is so big and has a growing economy, it does get a lot of domestic migrants. But it's growing from a large base, and doesn't (IIRC) even have a percentage growth due to domestic migrants in the top 10 today. It's largely high birth rates keeping Texas's population growth so robust.
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Old 04-03-2018, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,857 posts, read 2,993,379 times
Reputation: 3399
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Traditionally speaking, Texas's growth has been driven by high birth rates and immigration, not domestic migration. Here are the latest figures for FL and TX:

Florida:
Born in state -35.9%
Born in Northeast - 17.1%
Born in Midwest - 10.5%
Born elsewhere in South - 10.5%
Born in West - 2.7%
U.S. citizens - born outside U.S. - 3.5% (includes Puerto Ricans)
Foreign born - 19.9%

Texas:
Born in state - 60.0%
Born in Northeast - 2.8%
Born in Midwest - 5.9%
Born elsewhere in South - 8.0%
Born in West - 5.2%
U.S. citizens - born outside U.S. - 1.4% (PR population negligible)
Foreign born - 16.7%

Because Texas is so big and has a growing economy, it does get a lot of domestic migrants. But it's growing from a large base, and doesn't (IIRC) even have a percentage growth due to domestic migrants in the top 10 today. It's largely high birth rates keeping Texas's population growth so robust.
Welp there it is.
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Old 04-03-2018, 11:26 AM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,240,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Traditionally speaking, Texas's growth has been driven by high birth rates and immigration, not domestic migration. Here are the latest figures for FL and TX:

Florida:
Born in state -35.9%
Born in Northeast - 17.1%
Born in Midwest - 10.5%
Born elsewhere in South - 10.5%
Born in West - 2.7%
U.S. citizens - born outside U.S. - 3.5% (includes Puerto Ricans)
Foreign born - 19.9%

Texas:
Born in state - 60.0%
Born in Northeast - 2.8%
Born in Midwest - 5.9%
Born elsewhere in South - 8.0%
Born in West - 5.2%
U.S. citizens - born outside U.S. - 1.4% (PR population negligible)
Foreign born - 16.7%

Because Texas is so big and has a growing economy, it does get a lot of domestic migrants. But it's growing from a large base, and doesn't (IIRC) even have a percentage growth due to domestic migrants in the top 10 today. It's largely high birth rates keeping Texas's population growth so robust.
It doesn't really tell you about the major Texas metros, especially the Texas Triangle. Just the state as a whole.
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Old 04-03-2018, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,439 posts, read 11,944,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Welp there it is.
This is completely subjective, but my impression is that moderately high levels of domestic migration to Texas is driven by three factors:

1. Although not as celebrated as Atlanta and DC, Texas cities (particularly Dallas, and to a lesser extent Houston) have been attracting middle-class educated blacks from across the country.

2. Austin's rapid growth from mid-sized college town/state capitol to traffic-choked metropolis. Austin is in particular popular these days as a place for California residents to move to be able to afford a house.

3. The oil industry more broadly. Few of these people tend to say "I'm going to move to Houston because it seems like a nice city." It's more "I've graduated with an engineering degree, and there's a job opening there."

There's probably some movement from neighboring states like OK, NM, and AR of residents who just want to relocate to a relatively close metro with more opportunity as well.
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Old 04-03-2018, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,857 posts, read 2,993,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
This is completely subjective, but my impression is that moderately high levels of domestic migration to Texas is driven by three factors:

1. Although not as celebrated as Atlanta and DC, Texas cities (particularly Dallas, and to a lesser extent Houston) have been attracting middle-class educated blacks from across the country.

2. Austin's rapid growth from mid-sized college town/state capitol to traffic-choked metropolis. Austin is in particular popular these days as a place for California residents to move to be able to afford a house.

3. The oil industry more broadly. Few of these people tend to say "I'm going to move to Houston because it seems like a nice city." It's more "I've graduated with an engineering degree, and there's a job opening there."

There's probably some movement from neighboring states like OK, NM, and AR of residents who just want to relocate to a relatively close metro with more opportunity as well.
Good stuff. I think this is accurate. Saw Austin was growing at a 20% clip recently. Insane.
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Old 04-03-2018, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
It doesn't really tell you about the major Texas metros, especially the Texas Triangle. Just the state as a whole.
I can pull that data from the census by county, but not MSA. Here it is for the top five

Bexar County:
Born in state: 63.9%
Born in NE: 2.7%
Born in Midwest: 5.6%
Born elsewhere in South: 6.3%
Born in West: 5.9%
American - Born outside Continental U.S.: 2.3%
Foreign-born: 13.2%

Dallas County:
Born in state: 55.1%
Born in NE: 2.4%
Born in Midwest: 5.6%
Born elsewhere in South: 8.2%
Born in West: 4.0%
American - Born outside Continental U.S.: 1.1%
Foreign-born: 23.6%

Harris County:
Born in state: 53.2%
Born in NE: 3.0%
Born in Midwest: 4.7%
Born elsewhere in South: 8.4%
Born in West: 3.7%
American - Born outside Continental U.S.: 1.3%
Foreign-born: 25.7%

Tarrant County:
Born in state: 55.1%
Born in NE: 3.6%
Born in Midwest: 8.0%
Born elsewhere in South: 9.6%
Born in West: 6.2%
American - Born outside Continental U.S.: 1.7%
Foreign-born: 15.9%

Travis County:
Born in state: 52.9%
Born in NE: 4.7%
Born in Midwest: 7.7%
Born elsewhere in South: 8.1%
Born in West: 7.2%
American - Born outside Continental U.S.: 1.8%
Foreign-born: 17.5%

The level of domestic migration to the "big five" is as a percentage is higher in Tarrant and Travis, although lower in Bexar, Dallas, and Harris. Of course, in the case of Dallas and Harris it's lower partially because of very high rates of immigration. When looking at just U.S.-born residents, the percentage who are transplants is a bit above the statewide average in Harris, and just slightly below in Dallas.

I'm guessing if I looked at big suburban counties like Collin and Denton I'd see that similar to Tarrant they are enriched for domestic migrants.
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Old 04-03-2018, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,857 posts, read 2,993,379 times
Reputation: 3399
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I can pull that data from the census by county, but not MSA. Here it is for the top five

Bexar County:
Born in state: 63.9%
Born in NE: 2.7%
Born in Midwest: 5.6%
Born elsewhere in South: 6.3%
Born in West: 5.9%
American - Born outside Continental U.S.: 2.3%
Foreign-born: 13.2%

Dallas County:
Born in state: 55.1%
Born in NE: 2.4%
Born in Midwest: 5.6%
Born elsewhere in South: 8.2%
Born in West: 4.0%
American - Born outside Continental U.S.: 1.1%
Foreign-born: 23.6%

Harris County:
Born in state: 53.2%
Born in NE: 3.0%
Born in Midwest: 4.7%
Born elsewhere in South: 8.4%
Born in West: 3.7%
American - Born outside Continental U.S.: 1.3%
Foreign-born: 25.7%

Tarrant County:
Born in state: 55.1%
Born in NE: 3.6%
Born in Midwest: 8.0%
Born elsewhere in South: 9.6%
Born in West: 6.2%
American - Born outside Continental U.S.: 1.7%
Foreign-born: 15.9%

Travis County:
Born in state: 52.9%
Born in NE: 4.7%
Born in Midwest: 7.7%
Born elsewhere in South: 8.1%
Born in West: 7.2%
American - Born outside Continental U.S.: 1.8%
Foreign-born: 17.5%

The level of domestic migration to the "big five" is substantially larger than the state as a whole except in Bexar (San Antonio). However, all are still far less transplant dominated than Florida. And if I looked at Miami-Dade/Palm Beach/Broward, I'm sure it would be significantly different from Florida's statewide averages.
Looking at this, I'm surprised Travis has the lower % of people born in state. Thanks for the data.
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Old 04-03-2018, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,439 posts, read 11,944,656 times
Reputation: 10547
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Looking at this, I'm surprised Travis has the lower % of people born in state. Thanks for the data.
Travis is where Austin is located, which is of course a big magnet for domestic migrants in Texas. It also has a not insubstantial immigrant population - both Latino and Asian, albeit smaller than Dallas or Harris.

In general, it seems like Bexar tends to pull more heavily than the rest of the state from the West Coast, Dallas from the South (those black professional migrants) Harris from the South and Northeast, and Tarrant and Travis from everywhere.
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Old 04-03-2018, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,857 posts, read 2,993,379 times
Reputation: 3399
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Travis is where Austin is located, which is of course a big magnet for domestic migrants in Texas. It also has a not insubstantial immigrant population - both Latino and Asian, albeit smaller than Dallas or Harris.

In general, it seems like Bexar tends to pull more heavily than the rest of the state from the West Coast, Dallas from the South (those black professional migrants) Harris from the South and Northeast, and Tarrant and Travis from everywhere.
Looking at your numbers, Austin has the highest % pull from the west, well, pretty much everywhere I guess. It's well thought of around the country, at least the people I talk to.
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