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Old 01-23-2009, 02:13 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
Spot on Deacon with the exception of Stone Mountain/Memorial Drive area. However, I would say that Clayton County and areas of DeKalb south of Decatur proper are in current decline. I see parts of Gwinnett not looking so good either and wonder if Henry will start to decline.

Still a big north/south divide in Atlanta as opposed to inner ring/outer ring. Gwinnett seems to be the exception. The Gwinnett Place area, so hot in the 80s and 90s seems to have taken a nose dive since Mall of Georgia opened further out.
But I wouldn't consider any area of Gwinnett to be inner-ring...and probably not Stone Mountain now that I think about it. Henry County definitely isn't inner-ring, and neither is Clayton. I would say inner ring is inside the Perimeter or just outside of it.

Is Stone Mountain in decline? Most of that area, or at least what I'm familiar with, seems to be holding up well.
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Old 01-23-2009, 10:37 AM
 
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There is a great book that addresses this issue that came out a number of years ago. It is called "Edge City". For those who like this forum and how cities develop, I highly recommend.

It is interesting how older suburbs seem to be responsible, for many reasons, creating new further out suburbs. There have been signs of this trend reversing somewhat, but not everywhere.
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Old 01-23-2009, 10:46 AM
 
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^I will have to find that book to read. Thanks.

Inner ring suburbs here are 1920s-1940s. Some are very nice, and considered upper class, some are deteriorated. Most of the nicest neighborhoods with housing stock, and quiet nieghborhoods are in these first ring, street car suburbs. When you go a few more miles out, you get the 1950s white flight suburbs.

In my understanding the old street car suburbs built in the 1920-1940s were for the upper class elite. The 1950s white flight suburbs were when the middle class finally started to go after their american dream. That is why many more 1950s white flight suburbs are much more cookie cutter than the inner ring suburbs. Then there is the 1990-2000 exurbian suburbs, but lets not get into that hideous crap)
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Old 01-23-2009, 11:57 AM
 
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Originally Posted by gdude View Post
indianapolis,Indiana's suburbs have very low crime rates, great schools, traffic-depends on where your coming from and where you are going-usually light to moderate, excellent Greenway system, and very stong emphasis on values,


on a scale of 1-10 (1=lowest-10=highest) Indy suburbs get a 8 they are great but there are some areas they can improve on.
I thought Indianapolis annexed all their suburbs a couple decades ago. So wouldn't their "inner ring" suburbs be newer than those of most other cities?
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Old 01-23-2009, 12:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Awesomo.2000 View Post
^I will have to find that book to read. Thanks.

Inner ring suburbs here are 1920s-1940s. Some are very nice, and considered upper class, some are deteriorated. Most of the nicest neighborhoods with housing stock, and quiet nieghborhoods are in these first ring, street car suburbs. When you go a few more miles out, you get the 1950s white flight suburbs.

In my understanding the old street car suburbs built in the 1920-1940s were for the upper class elite. The 1950s white flight suburbs were when the middle class finally started to go after their american dream. That is why many more 1950s white flight suburbs are much more cookie cutter than the inner ring suburbs. Then there is the 1990-2000 exurbian suburbs, but lets not get into that hideous crap)
My understanding also. Here in the Twin Cities, "inner ring" suburbs are considered simply those suburbs that abut the central cities of Minneapolis and St Paul. They vary greatly in terms of decline. Socioeconomically, they are all over the map, from Edina, which is considered the "old money" WASP suburb, to St. Louis Park, which is middle-to-upper middle heavily Jewish with Russian Jewish immigrants moving in, to West St. Paul, which is blue collar, transitioning from largely white to Hispanic, to Maplewood, which looks 50s suburban and has had a heavy influx of lower middle class Asians, to Columbia Heights, which was working class white, with large numbers of African immigrants moving in, to Brooklyn Park, which now has a sizable African American population--and lots more in between.

The ones I hear the most about as being troubled would be Columbia Heights, Richfield, parts of Bloomimgton and to a lesser extent West St Paul. Brooklyn Center also seems to be struggling, though technically it is second ring, not first ring.
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Old 01-23-2009, 12:55 PM
 
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As NYC continues to gentrify, the areas of NJ closest to manhattan are taking a turn for the worst
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Old 01-23-2009, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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^I was under the impression that the opposite of that was going on?
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Old 01-23-2009, 01:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
My understanding also. Here in the Twin Cities, "inner ring" suburbs are considered simply those suburbs that abut the central cities of Minneapolis and St Paul. They vary greatly in terms of decline. Socioeconomically, they are all over the map, from Edina, which is considered the "old money" WASP suburb, to St. Louis Park, which is middle-to-upper middle heavily Jewish with Russian Jewish immigrants moving in, to West St. Paul, which is blue collar, transitioning from largely white to Hispanic, to Maplewood, which looks 50s suburban and has had a heavy influx of lower middle class Asians, to Columbia Heights, which was working class white, with large numbers of African immigrants moving in, to Brooklyn Park, which now has a sizable African American population--and lots more in between.

The ones I hear the most about as being troubled would be Columbia Heights, Richfield, parts of Bloomimgton and to a lesser extent West St Paul. Brooklyn Center also seems to be struggling, though technically it is second ring, not first ring.
Brooklyn Center is a first ring (confusion with Brooklyn Park there, maybe). But as the city of Minneapolis improves, the reverse is happening in Brooklyn Center and Richfield. This should not imply all inner ring suburbs, though. Most cities, and Minneapolis is no exception, develop spokes. Alot of people who live in the southern suburbs have some tie to the corresponding area in the city proper. Richfield, then, is an extension of the Nicollet Avenue corridor and the Chicago Avenue corridor. These corridors are rapidly gentrifying, and the people getting pushed out tend to go for the suburb in their same spoke. The same is true for Brooklyn Center -- an extension of the Northside. Edina or Saint Louis Park won't decline because they are extensions of Hennepin/Uptown and the Lakes, respectively. The disturbing problem arises in how these relatively small cities can cope with their burgeoning reality, their social support and police systems are not as developed as the City.
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Old 01-23-2009, 02:01 PM
 
Location: moving again
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within the beltway of DC in PGcounty, things are really bad
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Old 01-23-2009, 02:28 PM
 
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Originally Posted by polishdill86 View Post
In Detroit there is quite a variety with regards to inner-ring suburbs. Many inner-ring suburbs have distinct ethnic and socioeconomic distinctness. Suburbs immediately north of Detroit along the Woodward corridor are doing very well (e.g. Ferndale, Royal Oak, Pleasant Ridge). Metro Detroit's Gay and Lesbian community is heavily concentrated in this area, and home prices and gentrification have increased greatly throughout the past decade. To the west of the aforementioned communities lies Oak Park, which in the south is largely African-American and in the north is the center of the metro areas Jewish Orthodox community. Just west of Oak Park is Southfield. This community is host to several different communities, including; Armenian-Americans, African-Americans, and a sizable Jewish community (largely Conservative and Reform). Southfield is home to a large middle and upper-middle class African-American community. To the south and southwest of Southfield are the communities of Redford and Livonia. These communities are largely white working and middle-class communities (Detroit's version of the "Bungalow Belt"). On Detroit's southwest side are Dearborn and Dearborn Heights. This area has diverse ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. Dearborn in particular has a heavy concentration of Arab-Americans (over 1/3 of the cities approx 100,000 residents claim Arab-American ancestry). Dearborn is also home to North America's largest Mosque. South of Detroit is known locally as "downriver". This area is largely white and Latino and represents all socio-economic levels. In recent years "downriver" as seen a great increase in the number of Albanian-Americans. The "eastside" (Grosse Pointe and Macomb county) is a patchwork of many different groups. The Grosse Pointes are noted for a rather WASP like feel. Warren (Detroit's largest suburb) is a mix of Polish-Americans and more recently Arab-American residents.
You are even starting to see some Blacks move into Warren, a community that at one time had restrictions that discouraged Blacks from moving there.

I think some of the rougher suburbs of the Detroit area are Ecorse, River Rouge and Inkster.
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