U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Kentucky > Louisville area
 [Register]
Louisville area Jefferson County
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-04-2016, 05:29 PM
 
Location: IN
20,173 posts, read 34,510,109 times
Reputation: 12513

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by shinestx View Post
I really like Cincinnati. Has a lot of character. Great German food and culture. Really making a big comeback. Those townhouses are the first thing a driver in from the South notices, as you come down that steep hill and see the city on the river bank. Glad Cinci is getting its act together. It has long been the hub for that tri-state region, but will now blow away all the wannabes along the Ohio.
It will also be even better once continued improvements in air quality occur as it was quite bad in the past.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-04-2016, 07:05 PM
 
94 posts, read 76,290 times
Reputation: 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
You really need to go down to UofL library, and the Filson historical society, and browse old photos on microcache.
It is precisely that moment when I feel in love with a city I already liked, and felt I discovered a New Orleans type city that was a bit of an "atlantis."
I should. Is there much there that isn't available on the digitized UofL archives?

Quote:
Originally Posted by shinestx View Post
I really like Cincinnati. Has a lot of character. Great German food and culture. Really making a big comeback. Those townhouses are the first thing a driver in from the South notices, as you come down that steep hill and see the city on the river bank. Glad Cinci is getting its act together. It has long been the hub for that tri-state region, but will now blow away all the wannabes along the Ohio.
Yea, as a Louisvillian I don't like it but by some stroke of luck they managed to not tear down so much that I can't help but be fascinated. It's so unique and so urban compared to anything in this region or the south.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2016, 08:45 PM
 
6,297 posts, read 13,187,373 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by shinestx View Post
I really like Cincinnati. Has a lot of character. Great German food and culture. Really making a big comeback. Those townhouses are the first thing a driver in from the South notices, as you come down that steep hill and see the city on the river bank. Glad Cinci is getting its act together. It has long been the hub for that tri-state region, but will now blow away all the wannabes along the Ohio.
Another pot shot at Louisville. Wannabes? No one in Louisville thinks a thing about Cincinnati and if it were;t for job sin Cincinnati, many young people would (and do) move to Louisville as it is more of a hipster city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-06-2016, 10:34 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,589 posts, read 20,475,294 times
Reputation: 9079
The point isn't that Louisville's urban isn't walkable, its' that it's less dense than Cincinnati's urban core. Anyone that's been around both cities understands that. Old Louisville is the densest neighborhood in Louisville by a lot, in Cincinnati many urban neighborhoods have a similar density to Old Louisville - Covington, Newport, Mt Adams, Over the Rhine, Northside etc certainly as dense. It's not a matter of good vs bad, just different. Personally I prefer a bit more breathing room that you find in Pre WW1 New Albany vs Covington or Over The Rhine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2016, 02:20 PM
 
6,297 posts, read 13,187,373 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
The point isn't that Louisville's urban isn't walkable, its' that it's less dense than Cincinnati's urban core. Anyone that's been around both cities understands that. Old Louisville is the densest neighborhood in Louisville by a lot, in Cincinnati many urban neighborhoods have a similar density to Old Louisville - Covington, Newport, Mt Adams, Over the Rhine, Northside etc certainly as dense. It's not a matter of good vs bad, just different. Personally I prefer a bit more breathing room that you find in Pre WW1 New Albany vs Covington or Over The Rhine.
Moderator cut: see below There is nothing "wannabe" about Louisville or its urbanity. I'd put Louisville's urban nabes neck and neck w Cincy as far as well being, economy, walkability, and general urban feel. It's just one city has more east coast style architecture, and the other one more midwest and southern.

And as well as you know Louisville, Census, I think you leave out some integral areas. Just because Louisville does not have as much row housing intact does not mean it does not have density....Butchertown, Clifton, even parts of Russel, Limerick, Smoketown, Shelby Park, Original Highlands. They all have very high density areas...just different architecture.The rows of very dense shotguns in Louisville....those are Louisvilles answer to those neighborhoods in Cincy.

The only part of Cincinnati which I would say "blows" away anything in Louisville as far as density goes would be Over the Rhine. That is a special neighborhood in the Midwest, but also with lots of very special challenges and problems. There is still much work to do there. The difference between Cincy and Louisville? Cincy was able to preserve (and mainly I mean not give the wrecking ball to) many more of its urban vernacular structures than Louisville. As I noted, almost all of SoBro and even the east and west ends of downtown were very dense, multistory, mixed used retail, residential areas not unlike OTR. Sadly, those areas are parking lots or were replaced with some pretty uninspiring 1960s era midrises.

Last edited by Oldhag1; 07-07-2016 at 06:44 PM.. Reason: A please discuss the topic only, not other posters
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2016, 09:15 AM
 
2,391 posts, read 3,870,440 times
Reputation: 895
I think Louisville is behind in many ways of how bigger cities are~!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2016, 01:17 PM
 
6,297 posts, read 13,187,373 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by veggienut View Post
I think Louisville is behind in many ways of how bigger cities are~!
Chicago? Sure. Which cities do you speak of? I think the biggest issue with native Louisvillians is they have very low expectations and esteem for their city. My thought is this was from years of decline in the 70's and 80s. The biggest proponents of the city are those of us which are transplants here.

Louisville could work on alot, the biggest of which is higher education, particulary for minorities, racial integratoion, and ESPECIALLY, mass transit. But guess what? Every city struggles with these issues, particularly those in the top 20-50 in MSA
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2016, 07:24 AM
 
94 posts, read 76,290 times
Reputation: 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Moderator cut: see below

The only part of Cincinnati which I would say "blows" away anything in Louisville as far as density goes would be Over the Rhine. That is a special neighborhood in the Midwest, but also with lots of very special challenges and problems. There is still much work to do there. The difference between Cincy and Louisville? Cincy was able to preserve (and mainly I mean not give the wrecking ball to) many more of its urban vernacular structures than Louisville. As I noted, almost all of SoBro and even the east and west ends of downtown were very dense, multistory, mixed used retail, residential areas not unlike OTR. Sadly, those areas are parking lots or were replaced with some pretty uninspiring 1960s era midrises.
But I think a lot of Cincinatti is much more dense than anything in Louisville. Pretty much all of the neighborhoods around downtown are built in that very urban style and so much survived compared to almost nothing surviving in Louisville. I was on Eight just north of Broadway and there are two buildings both built right up to the street and it really gives you a hint of what the city was like when pretty much the entire downtown area was built up block after block. Whenever I bring people downtown I try to stick to the 4th st. Main st. T shaped area and it makes people think the city is much cooler than it actually is, not seeing the giant crater of parking lot that surrounds that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2016, 06:39 PM
 
2,391 posts, read 3,870,440 times
Reputation: 895
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Chicago? Sure. Which cities do you speak of? I think the biggest issue with native Louisvillians is they have very low expectations and esteem for their city. My thought is this was from years of decline in the 70's and 80s. The biggest proponents of the city are those of us which are transplants here.

Louisville could work on alot, the biggest of which is higher education, particulary for minorities, racial integratoion, and ESPECIALLY, mass transit. But guess what? Every city struggles with these issues, particularly those in the top 20-50 in MSA
I've been to many cities much, much larger and they offer more than what Louisville has. But like you mentioned: transportation & education. For one our bus service stinks and always have~! And secondly our education here is awful as far as the public schools goes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Kentucky > Louisville area
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top