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Old 01-20-2008, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Waldo County
1,220 posts, read 2,620,496 times
Reputation: 1363

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boomerang View Post
I was hoping that somebody would ask about or explain the packs of Subarus I sometimes see travelling 95 north around Portsmouth. Most of them head off towards VT though.
My neighbor here in Maine has a Volvo but it's from the 80's and just blew its engine, so there's one less....

The packs of Subarus are owned mostly women and others who are Volvo wannabees, OR their Volvos from the '80's have finally rusted out.

Now there are some Volvo owners who own them because of their all wheel drive system, and they own them instead of Audis due to initial price.

And there are quite a few Subaru owners who know that SUV's are short on both "sport" and "utility" and have made the intelligent choice to buy a car that works in Maine, but will manage to travel the distance between gas pumps above the Volvo Line.

As a side note, it must be mentioned here that "The Volvo Line" is an archaic term, much as the French found out "The Maginot Line" was outdated in 1940.
Once Ford bought Volvo cars and General Motors acquired Saab cars from their parent companies, former members of the Volvo Bund, who would NEVER be seen in an American owned/produced car, all switched to Subarus or Japenese made SUV's with a few Priae mixed in.
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Old 01-20-2008, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
6,302 posts, read 8,152,991 times
Reputation: 4375
Farmington and Rumford are way below the Volvo Line. The line falls considerably north of Sugarloaf USA which is infested with Volvos. The Volvo Line is 45 degrees north latitude. That way it's above Orono.

-break-

I wonder what I wrote last nght that was deemed "off topic". My mind doesn't usually wander.
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Old 01-20-2008, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
7,504 posts, read 14,627,148 times
Reputation: 4707
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
It's all of the above. It lies half way up Maine at precisely 45 degrees north latitude. That also happens to be half way up Maine.
If it is 'all of the above' then wouldn't the line zig-zag all over the place? I find it interesting that the line lays just above Orono.

I am almost certain that a Southern Mainer would move the line below Lewiston/Auburn.
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Old 01-20-2008, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Glendive, MT
7,392 posts, read 8,524,301 times
Reputation: 5345
I just have to add a little tidbit to this....

I didn't realize that Jon Reisman coined the term "Volvo Line".....I know him personally. Now I have to say it doesn't surprise me at all that the phrase is difficult to define and creates controversy. I would venture to guess that was quite possibly the goal of the phrase.

I'm adding more to this because the way I said that came out to sound different than how I meant it. One of Prof. Reisman's concerns is the loss of rural culture in Maine--I wouldn't be surprised that *if* he coined this phrase it was done intentionally to provoke thought and discussion....and controversy enough to keep the discussion going. I hope that's a bit more clear.....

Last edited by mollysmiles; 01-20-2008 at 08:28 AM.. Reason: trying to clarify :)
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Old 01-20-2008, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Maine's garden spot
2,490 posts, read 3,082,312 times
Reputation: 2170
Pembroke, Harrington and Whiting are just a few towns that I wouldn't consider Volvo infested. They are close to the 45th parallel, but are still south of it.
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Old 01-20-2008, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
6,302 posts, read 8,152,991 times
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Sugarloaf USA is definitely below the Volvo Line and does lie a little above 45 degrees north. I will grant that there are also a few non-Volvo enclaves below the line. Central Waldo County comes to mind.
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Old 01-20-2008, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
7,504 posts, read 14,627,148 times
Reputation: 4707
Quote:
Originally Posted by mollysmiles View Post

One of Prof. Reisman's concerns is the loss of rural culture in Maine--I wouldn't be surprised that *if* he coined this phrase it was done intentionally to provoke thought and discussion....and controversy enough to keep the discussion going. I hope that's a bit more clear.....
Rural Maine is a very long way from being threatened. Despite the population of the Greater Portland Area, Lewiston/Auburn and the other "larger" towns (well, large by Maine standards) the state is still, what, 90% rural, maybe?
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Old 01-20-2008, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
6,302 posts, read 8,152,991 times
Reputation: 4375
Rural Maine is under wholesale attack. I was at the LURC hearing in Greenville yesterday. A landowner wants to rezone and develop about one percent of the land they own. To obtain this benefit, the environmental industry has forced them to give up their rights on over 400,000 acres. It isn't enough. Though they came to an agreement with three environmental organizations, there is a whole alphabet soup of organizations allied against them. If their application is approved, the buyers of those lots must still submit applications to build something. It's a huge gamble for all involved.

I heard a new term yesterday and it's a great one. "Anchor families" are multigenerational and have roots deep in a community. They are dedicated and their roots are hard to dig out. They are trying to keep the next generation here in Maine. The environmental industry has a particular hatred for them. They call such families "microcapitalists". They are the ones who own the grocery store, lumber yard, general store, excavator business and funeral home. They knit the community together and the viros hate them. They not only want you and me gone, they want the anchor families gone too.
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Old 01-20-2008, 11:39 AM
 
2,766 posts, read 3,422,680 times
Reputation: 2967
Anyone have a map for visualization?
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Old 01-20-2008, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Glendive, MT
7,392 posts, read 8,524,301 times
Reputation: 5345
Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
Rural Maine is a very long way from being threatened. Despite the population of the Greater Portland Area, Lewiston/Auburn and the other "larger" towns (well, large by Maine standards) the state is still, what, 90% rural, maybe?
for my input on your remark--NMLM said it best....read his post.
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