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Old 05-16-2012, 06:22 AM
 
419 posts, read 340,225 times
Reputation: 439

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Yes, absolutely. I'm not really struggling money-wise, but I've got the same artistic goals at heart. I'd love to spend my life with such a like minded person. I also believe someone who pursues their dreams, with some degree of success, is happier than someone who has given up and resigned to generic work. I don't really care whether that's true or not either. I believe it!
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Old 05-16-2012, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Texas
28,114 posts, read 24,084,256 times
Reputation: 33733
Would You Date Or Marry Someone Struggling To Make Ends Meet In An Artistic Occupation?

No. Nothing to do with money.
I just generally don't get along well with artsy-fartsy types.
Have a few as friends...can't ever see it going past that.
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Old 05-16-2012, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Middle America
18,099 posts, read 15,621,234 times
Reputation: 21171
I very much get along with artsy types, and am one. But I also have a job that supports me. I don't buy the immature viewpoint that you're selling out if you opt for a regularly paying career over "your art." You don't stop being artistic because you're earning regular income. Most people I know engaged in the arts got over the idea that supporting themselves financially (and often in jobs that aren't directly related to their artistic interest) is "so establishment" sometime in their teens, early twenties at the latest.

My SO is a highly trained jazz pianist. He plays all the time. He also holds down a well-paying job in forensic accounting. It doesn't seem to have diminished his art in the least, somehow. People manage to pursue their interests WHILE earning a living. It can be done.
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Old 05-16-2012, 06:40 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
3,924 posts, read 2,820,185 times
Reputation: 2597
YES! I would love to have a mate in an artistic or creative occupation. This would be an ideal partner for me....
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Old 05-16-2012, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Texas
28,114 posts, read 24,084,256 times
Reputation: 33733
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
I very much get along with artsy types, and am one. But I also have a job that supports me. I don't buy the immature viewpoint that you're selling out if you opt for a regularly paying career over "your art." You don't stop being artistic because you're earning regular income. Most people I know engaged in the arts got over the idea that supporting themselves financially (and often in jobs that aren't directly related to their artistic interest) is "so establishment" sometime in their teens, early twenties at the latest.

My SO is a highly trained jazz pianist. He plays all the time. He also holds down a well-paying job in forensic accounting. It doesn't seem to have diminished his art in the least, somehow. People manage to pursue their interests WHILE earning a living. It can be done.
THIS!!!!!!!!!!!!


I think most of us have an 'artistic' side to us. Well, except my wife. She despises all things artistic. She enjoys viewing or listening or reading it. Just does not want any part of creating it.
I play piano and guitar, I like to write, and I love photography and drawing. I always wanted to write a book or work in comics.
Hell, I've even done needlepoint and knit.
The difference is that I don't guess it's enough a part of me to have pursued it as a career. And that is great for me because the lack of pressure and free creativity makes it FUN. Pure fun.

The viewpoint expressed by TR is so important and so mature.

I know so many people who are so determined NOT to embrace reality that I get to hear them whine and complain about not making ends meet because they insist that they only get to do what's fun and fulfilling to them (read: pretty much just FUN) all the time. Anything else is unacceptable. For some reason, most of the people I know who are like this are art-inclined.

Many times, these people will never be successful even in their artistic endeavors because what they lack, what they truly lack, is discipline.

Jazz pianists aren't borne from dicking around. That takes a lot of hard work, tens of thousands of hours of practice, and discipline.
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Middle America
18,099 posts, read 15,621,234 times
Reputation: 21171
You know, one of my creative pursuits of choice is writing. All my career choices have been ones that tap into my writing skill...some creative writing, some technical writing, some business writing, etc. But I've only had one job where writing for an audience was the prime job description - when I worked as a newspaper reporter, writer, editor, and columnist.

I did it for seven years before I finally dealt with the fact that when your artistic pursuits become your job, they sometimes become less fun. Writing is more fun to me when it's not an obligation. I've been out of the field for five years, now, and am just getting back to the point where I write for pleasure. Your interests can, and in the best case scenarios, SHOULD play into what you do for a living (I have to delve into the depths of my creativity every minute of every day, teaching kids who have learning disabilities)...but there is a fine line where sometimes, it being your job can suck the enjoyment out of things you love doing for leisure and personal fulfillment. Anything can get old when it's placed in a pressure context. Your artistic outlets can morph into something different when they become obligatory duties. I know that, for me, writing on demand was nowhere near as much fun, in the long term, as writing just for myself, on my own schedule, for my own enjoyment.
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:13 AM
 
4,231 posts, read 2,839,787 times
Reputation: 5132
I am a writer as well. Although I hate creative writing. I have been a copy writer and am currently a proposal writer getting my Masters in Professional Writing (private an public sectors-grant writing, IT, rhetoric, web content, etc). I enjoy structure and mechanical/technical language much more than novels or dialogue written in a story.

I do really appreciate people with artistic flair. Though I've chosen a very professional route with my artistic skill, I love a man who is musically or artistically gifted even if it doesn't pay the bills. I feel I will be successful enough in my profession to support myself along with someone with artistic talent that doesn't necessarily "bring home the bacon".
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Middle America
18,099 posts, read 15,621,234 times
Reputation: 21171
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan

I know so many people who are so determined NOT to embrace reality that I get to hear them whine and complain about not making ends meet because they insist that they only get to do what's fun and fulfilling to them (read: pretty much just FUN) all the time. Anything else is unacceptable. For some reason, most of the people I know who are like this are art-inclined.

Many times, these people will never be successful even in their artistic endeavors because what they lack, what they truly lack, is discipline.

Jazz pianists aren't borne from dicking around. That takes a lot of hard work, tens of thousands of hours of practice, and discipline.
I have a childhood friend who is a painter...she's a decent painter. In high school, I found her identification as an artist a bit pretentious, because her skills didn't seem anymore fully developed than anybody else's in basic art survey courses. But she got her MFA in painting, cool. She's grown and learned. She lives, unfortunately, in an area where the artwork that people buy for their walls are Thomas Kinkade prints from mall kiosks, not original works. Small, rural town, not urban locale with frequent art fairs, etc. Not much of a market for her to make a living doing abstract painting.

She uses her self-chosen identity as "artist" to beg off regular full-time employment, for sure. She has modeled different jobs...substitute teacher, graphic designer for a small press, assistant to a portrait photographer, etc., but always comes back to the fact that she'd rather "just be an artist" than work full-time. In her case, it's definitely a discipline thing. It's not like she's cranking out paintings while unemployed. She's just not very interested in working full-time, and saying, "But, I'm an artist," is a way that's worked for her to justify it. Her spouse is also skilled in the visual arts. But he works full-time in an unrelated field and always has. Still an artist.
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Middle America
18,099 posts, read 15,621,234 times
Reputation: 21171
Quote:
Originally Posted by findly185 View Post
I am a writer as well. Although I hate creative writing. I have been a copy writer and am currently a proposal writer getting my Masters in Professional Writing (private an public sectors-grant writing, IT, rhetoric, web content, etc). I enjoy structure and mechanical/technical language much more than novels or dialogue written in a story.

I do really appreciate people with artistic flair. Though I've chosen a very professional route with my artistic skill, I love a man who is musically or artistically gifted even if it doesn't pay the bills. I feel I will be successful enough in my profession to support myself along with someone with artistic talent that doesn't necessarily "bring home the bacon".
I'm the opposite, as a writer. I'm good with a clinical approach to writing, which is essential in my profession (and was important in hard news stories crafted in "just the facts" inverted pyramid model), but my writing of choice, even in journalism, was always in human interest features, personality profiles, reviews, and opinion editorials, and columns. I was the recipient of several press association awards during my tenure, and they were consistently for my writing in "color" pieces...never straight news reportage. I can do it...it's just not as interesting. I'm not so much for fiction writing (although I loved it as a teen), but I do strongly prefer feature writing to any other type. The narrative approach has always been my preference, although I am not especially interested in writing fiction.
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:34 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
1,569 posts, read 1,075,871 times
Reputation: 1573
no, a woman needs to hold her own to be with me. If she was atractive, cooked, cleaned and had sex with me any time I wanted it than I might be OK with her not bringing home the bacon and doing her art. But otherwise she would have to hold her own while doing her art.
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