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Old 08-28-2019, 07:51 AM
 
30,032 posts, read 35,174,797 times
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https://time.com/5662200/elderly-hunger-in-america/

The above is shared for information and discussion and not advocacy.
We often have discussion in here about the safety net for seniors.
So here is some FOOD for thought.

The following is from the link:

(Indeed, millions of seniors across the country quietly go hungry as the safety net designed to catch them frays. Nearly 8% of Americans 60 and older were “food insecure” in 2017, according to a recent study released by the anti-hunger group Feeding America. That’s 5.5 million seniors who don’t have consistent access to enough food for a healthy life, a number that has more than doubled since 2001 and is only expected to grow as America grays.

While the plight of hungry children elicits support and can be tackled in schools, the plight of hungry older Americans is shrouded by isolation and a generation’s pride. The problem is most acute in parts of the South and Southwest. Louisiana has the highest rate among states, with 12% of seniors facing food insecurity. Memphis fares worst among major metropolitan areas, with 17% of seniors like Milligan unsure of their next meal.)

 
Old 08-28-2019, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Arizona
218 posts, read 126,179 times
Reputation: 933
Should I ever find myself in that situation it would be really difficult for me to accept help. Too much pride to admit defeat I guess, so I understand those who don't but wow...It's a sobering reminder of how bad things are for some people.
 
Old 08-28-2019, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
24,247 posts, read 18,067,064 times
Reputation: 28506
It's easy to forget the hardship out there if you live in an affluent area or are pretty affluent yourself, as are many people here.
 
Old 08-28-2019, 12:48 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,268 posts, read 1,414,259 times
Reputation: 6637
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sibay View Post
Should I ever find myself in that situation it would be really difficult for me to accept help. Too much pride to admit defeat I guess, so I understand those who don't but wow...It's a sobering reminder of how bad things are for some people.
Pride vs Hunger. I think I would teach myself to accept help.

Many senior centers provide low-cost or no-cost lunches. I would go if I had to.
 
Old 08-28-2019, 12:52 PM
 
6,540 posts, read 5,228,547 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
Pride vs Hunger. I think I would teach myself to accept help.

Many senior centers provide low-cost or no-cost lunches. I would go if I had to.
yes - all you have to remember is that most of the food that you see in the stores is already being subsidized by the government. They don't seem to be too prideful to take - so just see it as being passed on to you

We have a food bank truck or pantry in our small town almost every single week. When i help, i sure do take stuff home.

Sometimes we have so much left over too.
 
Old 08-28-2019, 12:55 PM
 
Location: La Jolla
348 posts, read 173,257 times
Reputation: 634
I know that the senior center my parents play bridge at offers low cost meals. I think my mom said that lunch costs $4, but if you can't afford it they will just give it to you for free.
 
Old 08-28-2019, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Asheville NC
1,653 posts, read 1,346,230 times
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One of the main charities that we personally support and volunteer for, is the MANNA food bank in Asheville.

https://www.mannafoodbank.org/

It services five counties in Western North Carolina.
 
Old 08-28-2019, 03:21 PM
 
39,091 posts, read 15,358,684 times
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During my social worker days, it was not unusual to come across older people who did not have anything decent to eat. Or towards the end of the month, nothing to eat at all.

Though there were soup kitchens and food pantries available, transportation was often a barrier. As was pride. Walking to the bus stop and navigating the bus system was often too physically or cognitively demanding.

Without family to help them navigate the paperwork to sign up for meals on wheels, get them to senior center meals, etc., they relied on monthly cab trips to the grocery store where they stocked up on mostly canned goods and rationed them the rest of the month.

They would come to the attention of the county social workers when a neighbor, landlord, or repair person would report that they were worried about some unusual behavior. During a welfare check, the food situation would come to light.

Last edited by GotHereQuickAsICould; 08-28-2019 at 03:33 PM..
 
Old 08-28-2019, 04:06 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,268 posts, read 1,414,259 times
Reputation: 6637
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
yes - all you have to remember is that most of the food that you see in the stores is already being subsidized by the government. They don't seem to be too prideful to take - so just see it as being passed on to you

We have a food bank truck or pantry in our small town almost every single week. When i help, i sure do take stuff home.

Sometimes we have so much left over too.
I wonder, do people know the truck is there? Do they list it on the community calendar of your local newspaper? Or put up flyers at the senior centers or libraries? Lots of places to advertise for free.
 
Old 08-28-2019, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Northern Wisconsin
9,064 posts, read 7,873,965 times
Reputation: 15651
Sorry, but I dont buy the food insecurity schtick. First, there is social security and welfare food stamps meals on wheels and various free food offers from others. Many cities also have food pantries with free food. We had one in Lubbock Tx. They had so much money they were paying kids in summer to come and be paid and taught how to grow food.

If these people are shut ins (cant get out of their house on their own) family needs to take them in or be put in nursing home or some assisted living arrangement. Maybe the local govt could take over and then bill the family. I've seen situations where the children of the elderly completely shirk their duty.
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