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Old 11-09-2009, 02:14 AM
 
26,182 posts, read 28,587,730 times
Reputation: 24920

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas User View Post
I was jumping up and down in joy when the House passed the Reform. Lets hope Senate does the same thing and that means 96% of Americans will get affordable health care.

How is he spreading the wealth? There is no pain!

COBRA is expensive if you leave your employer and buying health insurance for yourself cost arm and a leg.
The pain will merely be distributed around more evenly. The high costs of our bloated and inefficient system are still there. Getting everyone covered doesn't fix the cost problem at all--it just spreads it around more evenly, as states like Massachusetts have proven. At the rate we're going, we're going to bankrupt ourselves paying all this money for mediocre/poor results.
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Old 11-09-2009, 07:49 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
531 posts, read 1,807,255 times
Reputation: 302
To get back to the original question in this thread: yes, I retired at 38. Yes, paying for health insurance has been a mighty nightmare. No, I don't believe that the Minions of the Wealthy (congress) are going to do anything to help we Little People in the realm of healthcare or anywhere else for that matter.

If the Congress would just pass LAWS like they are supposed to, we could do the rest for ourselves, and it wouldn't cost a taxpayer dime:
--require all providers--hospitals, doctors, labs, drugmakers--operate as 401c3 corporations.
--require all providers post their prices (hey, like going to McDonalds!) so that finally we can do some comparison shopping.
--put a price on human life so that people can't sue and sue and sue (because guess who pays for all that?). Institute criminal charges for doctors that are truly negligent, take away their license to practice.

If we controlled costs in this way, we could say bye-bye to the profit-sucking insurance man and pay our chosen providers directly. But right now, costs are out of control. You can sure bet that Congress will do nothing to rein them in. We're doomed.
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Old 11-09-2009, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,732 posts, read 49,546,472 times
Reputation: 19166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas User View Post
You live out in the country?
Not way out in the boonies, but yes rural.

7 miles from the freeway another 12 miles into a city with multiple hospitals, colleges, shopping, and an international airport.

We are in an area that has no droughts, ever.

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Old 11-09-2009, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,721 posts, read 33,754,671 times
Reputation: 51993
If you retire in your 40s you will be spending your retirement with people the ages of your parents and older. If you intend to be active during the daytime when you would normally be at work, just consider that what you like to do and what they like to do, what you like to talk about and what they like to talk about, might not be the same. For example: They may like different movies, books, TV shows and music or they may be unwilling to drive any distance in a car or at night...but they'll travel to Europe or Asia if they traveled pre-retirement.

I retired at age 55 and my biggest shock were the number of seniors still computer illiterate, especially the ones who have been retired 10 years or more. They don't know how to get instant information. They have to have a hardcopy of everything or if you send them something electronically, they print it out. They check their e-mail once a week and sometimes less than that or not at all so they often miss announcements/cancellations/changes. They still write letters. They still want photo prints or send you prints even if they have a computer. If they do check e-mail, they'll send you an email telling you to call them instead of explaining what they want in the message. And, I'm speaking of intelligent people. They must have just missed out on the computer revolution at work, thought they never would have to get on that train if they retired, and now they are out there, adrift (in my opinion). (P.S. if you are reading this, it's not you I'm talking about.)

If you do activities, of course you will be with other people, regardless of age, who also do those activities, so that's not an issue. But, it will be harder to find friends to talk to and who share your interests beyond those joint activities because of the generation divide between a 45 year old retiree and a 65 - 85 year old retiree.

Just something to think about.
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Old 11-09-2009, 09:52 AM
 
8,648 posts, read 15,321,300 times
Reputation: 4570
Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
I understand.

Health coverage today is a nightmare.

Up until the 50's there was not this wide array of new drugs, and $1million test equipment that docs could use. You could go to a doctor and reasonably figure that after he treated you, you could pay with the cash in your pocket.

But today the tests are expensive, and it is not uncommon to see a month's prescription drug bill at more than a person's gross pay.

In my case, my employer covers me.

After 20 years in the military, uh 18 combat tours, it is assumed that each retiree has a laundry list of medical problems. Which is why we do not even mess with 'disabilities' or the VA. The military simply gives us a pension and provides health coverage. I can walk onto any US military base and usually be treated [Active Duty are treated first, retirees are a lower priority].

Since I do not live near a base, they automatically cover me with a policy [Tricare].

I have a duodenal ulcer, I have absorbed massive levels of hard radiation, I had a spine injury which acts up from time to time, multiple concussions and a list of minor junk. Most of it is like time-bombs just waiting for the long-term effects to kick-in.

The average 'vet' who served for a tour and got out, has to mess with the VA. Commonly the VA will only treat the complications from documented injuries received while they were on Active Duty. It is good that the VA exists, but the scope of what they will treat is very limited.
That's not true.....Take it from "The average 'vet'" that uses the VA Hospital... I'll admit that it is not as good as having private health insurance....but you are wrong on both of those statements.
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Old 11-09-2009, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Sierra Vista, AZ
16,133 posts, read 20,857,257 times
Reputation: 8293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Houston3 View Post
That's not true.....Take it from "The average 'vet'" that uses the VA Hospital... I'll admit that it is not as good as having private health insurance....but you are wrong on both of those statements.
Wow 18 Combat tours has to be a record

I agree, the VA covers everything, not just service connected problems. I get hearing aids, eyeglasses and Dental Care along with all of my Prescritions. What I find alarming lately is that these clinics can't handle walk ins. I have been to the Emergency Ward twice this year. Luckily I have TriCare For Life and Medicare
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Old 11-09-2009, 10:00 AM
 
8,648 posts, read 15,321,300 times
Reputation: 4570
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas User View Post
If Senate passes the HCR, you can buy it for affordable price.

If you want to honest about it, NO ONE even knows yet what it will cost anyone...
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Old 11-09-2009, 10:15 AM
 
8,648 posts, read 15,321,300 times
Reputation: 4570
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boompa View Post
Wow 18 Combat tours has to be a record

I agree, the VA covers everything, not just service connected problems. I get hearing aids, eyeglasses and Dental Care along with all of my Prescritions. What I find alarming lately is that these clinics can't handle walk ins. I have been to the Emergency Ward twice this year. Luckily I have TriCare For Life and Medicare
I only served three years so I don't get any of those, at one time I would have but it was all cut back because of underfunding of the VA..

But they have been keeping my bad heart running....and it's not service connected...

They also did an MRI on my back...and it is not service connected..

And I do get my heart meds thru the VA... It has saved my life..

I retired at 58 because of my heart... I missed getting up and going to work for about a year...but not now...LOL
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Old 11-09-2009, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,732 posts, read 49,546,472 times
Reputation: 19166
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
If you retire in your 40s you will be spending your retirement with people the ages of your parents and older. If you intend to be active during the daytime when you would normally be at work, just consider that what you like to do and what they like to do, what you like to talk about and what they like to talk about, might not be the same. For example: They may like different movies, books, TV shows and music or they may be unwilling to drive any distance in a car or at night...but they'll travel to Europe or Asia if they traveled pre-retirement.
We have not found this to be true.

I only really deal with older folks when I attend VFW meetings [once or twice a month].



Quote:
... I retired at age 55 and my biggest shock were the number of seniors still computer illiterate, especially the ones who have been retired 10 years or more. They don't know how to get instant information. They have to have a hardcopy of everything or if you send them something electronically, they print it out. They check their e-mail once a week and sometimes less than that or not at all so they often miss announcements /cancellations /changes. They still write letters. They still want photo prints or send you prints even if they have a computer. If they do check e-mail, they'll send you an email telling you to call them instead of explaining what they want in the message. And, I'm speaking of intelligent people. They must have just missed out on the computer revolution at work, thought they never would have to get on that train if they retired, and now they are out there, adrift (in my opinion). (P.S. if you are reading this, it's not you I'm talking about.)

If you do activities, of course you will be with other people, regardless of age, who also do those activities, so that's not an issue. But, it will be harder to find friends to talk to and who share your interests beyond those joint activities because of the generation divide between a 45 year old retiree and a 65 - 85 year old retiree.

Just something to think about.
I retired to an area where this is very common. Not just older folks.

Few businesses here have any web presence.

Our local newspaper has no website.
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Old 11-09-2009, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,732 posts, read 49,546,472 times
Reputation: 19166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Houston3 View Post
That's not true.....Take it from "The average 'vet'" that uses the VA Hospital... I'll admit that it is not as good as having private health insurance....but you are wrong on both of those statements.
I stand corrected.

I do know a lot of guys through the VFW who use the VA a great deal.

So I only know of the VA through what they say.

Thank you for the correction.
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