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Old 11-09-2010, 10:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eleanora1 View Post
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/07/ed...trategy-t.html



I understand if one is blind or deaf. But if you have a learning problem it seems to me you'll have to solve that problem facing the same criteria everyone else does. Would anyone want to hire a doctor who needed "special accommodations" to fix your medical problems? How about a lawyer who took far longer than average to compose an argument?

FYI, I don't have particularly strong feelings one way or the other but I thought it was an interesting topic for debate and a fascinating article.
Actually if you are blind and the test is in braille, you probably don't need extra time. If you are deaf and can read, you also probably don't need extra time.

If you have a physical disability which means you write more slowly, then you certainly need extra time.

And, if you have a true learning disability, you *may* need extra time. For example, if you read much more slowly because of dyslexia, but still comprehend at the college level, more time would be a good idea.

I think that many people do not really understand what ADHD does and why kids need less distractions and more time. Children with ADHD often have trouble with speed of information processing. They can and do process the information well, but it can take them more time.

ADHD Kids Can Get Better - TIME

Quote:
Scientists have found that the brain development of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is delayed but otherwise typical, according to a new study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Comparing brain scans of children aged 6 to 16 who had the common psychiatric disorder with scans of those who did not, researchers found that some areas in the ADHD brain particularly those involved in thinking, attention and planning matured an average of three years later than "healthy" brains, but otherwise followed normal patterns of development.
This may mean that for most kids with ADHD, they will develop the ability to do better on timed tests as they mature, but it is hard to say.

There is a Canadian comedian who has done a special on ADD

ADD & Loving It (http://www.globalnews.ca/Loving/2009300/story.html - broken link)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRjbjYeUI7U

You can buy the dvd here:
TotallyADD.com: A complete guide to ADD, ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) in adulthood and the documentary ADD & Loving It?! | dvd (http://totallyadd.com/shop-products/dvd/add%20&%20loving%20it?!%20documentary/ - broken link)

Dorothy
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Old 11-09-2010, 11:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smooth23 View Post
NO NO NO they should NOT be given extra time. Why should normal students have to compete for spots in their preferred colleges with idiots who've been told all their lives that they are special, and catered to. When reality is that they won't be able to hack it in the no BS realm of real college classes and will give up or fail out anyhow.
In reality, the ONLY place where you see timed tests is in school. At work, I could always go look up answers I needed and data. I did not have to memorize most facts. At work, sometimes we were under deadline, but mostly we could use whatever time we needed to get the work done.

My husband's favorite quote to a customer was *the project can be on time, under budget or correct - which of these would you prefer.* He worked for IBM for 30 years and most customers want the project to be correct.

Dorothy
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Old 11-09-2010, 11:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattie View Post
Fortunately, more intelligent people than you make the determination for accommodations.

My son is not an idiot. If he was, he never would have qualified for an IEP. He is highly intelligent, with a learning disability. He deserves a level playing field when it comes to testing. And yes, he gets extra time at his college also. He also spends much more time on his homework than his friends, because he has to read everything several times to make sure he's clear on it. Some of his buddies have already flunked out, including one of his roommates, and they have no learning disabilities.
There is a huge difference between someone who learns differently and a learning disability. And the difference is that those with a disability aren't capable of learning at the same rate and volume as those without. Pure and simple. Someone who learns differently can adapt themselves, without being coddled. Someone with a learning disability isn't going to realistically keep up with someone without.

I'm not saying those with a disability cannot get educated to some degree, and hold prosperous careers, but as someone else said I surely wouldn't want my surgeon to need an extra 5 minutes to stop the bleeding.
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Old 11-09-2010, 11:06 AM
 
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Originally Posted by LeavingMassachusetts View Post
I can name 7 off the top of my head and I don't know a ton of kids. My kids old pediatrician told me that about 1 of every 5 mothers came in asking for it insisting their child had ADHD. He gave it to exactly one child, but he also said that unfortunately, not all Dr's thought like him.

I realize the CDC stats but I must have lived then and currently live now in some weird paradox because it is rampant here.
I agree, there are far more kids being drugged for adhd and similar 'conditions' than 3 or 4%. When I was in school in the mid 90's I'd say it MIGHT have been that low
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Old 11-09-2010, 11:09 AM
 
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Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
I don't think they should be given extra time. They just have to learn how to work the problems in a way that work for him/her. Think of how Jim Abbot got by with his disabilities.
He was an amazing man and made his own accommodations for not having a hand, but... while his pitching was not a problem for him, the accommodation made for batting was the fact that the league used a designated hitter for him when he was pitching in the majors. It is possible that this was not needed, but it was done anyway.

Dorothy
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Old 11-09-2010, 11:13 AM
 
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If you give extra time on these tests then you need to change the nameof the test. If it is a standardized test that should mean it is the same test for everyone. PERIOD
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Old 11-09-2010, 11:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeavingMassachusetts View Post
I can name 7 off the top of my head and I don't know a ton of kids. My kids old pediatrician told me that about 1 of every 5 mothers came in asking for it insisting their child had ADHD. He gave it to exactly one child, but he also said that unfortunately, not all Dr's thought like him.

I realize the CDC stats but I must have lived then and currently live now in some weird paradox because it is rampant here.
I have a grandson with autism and a granddaughter with asperger's and adhd. Everyone on my boards concerned with special needs avoids medications for as long as they possibly can. They certainly do NOT go to docs asking for meds for their kids. Every parent I know agonizes over whether or not to allow the doctors to prescribe meds. They will try all kinds of diets. They will try all kinds of behavior therapies before they ever use meds.

Not only that, but many of us get told *your kids are normal, they are boys, they will grow out of it, you are a paranoid mom.* Guess what, it is not true.

Also, teachers are by law, not allowed to suggest that parents get meds despite all the hype you hear.

Dorothy
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Old 11-09-2010, 11:20 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smooth23 View Post
There is a huge difference between someone who learns differently and a learning disability. And the difference is that those with a disability aren't capable of learning at the same rate and volume as those without. Pure and simple. Someone who learns differently can adapt themselves, without being coddled. Someone with a learning disability isn't going to realistically keep up with someone without.

I'm not saying those with a disability cannot get educated to some degree, and hold prosperous careers, but as someone else said I surely wouldn't want my surgeon to need an extra 5 minutes to stop the bleeding.
You are wrong. My son can learn at the same volume as everyone else, and has proven it. Yes, he needs more time to process the written word, but once he has that extra time, he understands what he has read.

Should he choose to go into medicine, he would probably do well. He has no difficulty learning with a hands-on approach. Med school would be tough because of the sheer amount of reading involved. But, once that hurdle was passed, he would be capable of performing at the same pace as any other doctor.
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Old 11-09-2010, 11:20 AM
 
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Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Also, teachers are by law, not allowed to suggest that parents get meds despite all the hype you hear.

Dorothy
Please, do cite your source. Regardless of whether it is against the law or not, teachers DO suggest it very frequently. Shoot, when I was in first or second grade about 20 years ago I had a teacher telling my mom I was ADD and needed to be put on meds. Thankfully my mother was intelligent and laughed at the teacher and told her to mind her business.
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Old 11-09-2010, 11:24 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Mattie View Post
You are wrong. My son can learn at the same volume as everyone else, and has proven it. Yes, he needs more time to process the written word, but once he has that extra time, he understands what he has read.

Should he choose to go into medicine, he would probably do well. He has no difficulty learning with a hands-on approach. Med school would be tough because of the sheer amount of reading involved. But, once that hurdle was passed, he would be capable of performing at the same pace as any other doctor.
Good luck with him passing med school entrance exams and board exams.

So by your math, if I can learn say 100 pages of material in 3 days, your son can learn that same 100 pages of material.. that's great. But then you say once he gets more time. How much more time, 1 extra day? So lets say he learns 100 pages in 4 days, versus my 100 in 3 days. At the end of 12 days I'll have learned 400 pages to his 300 pages. See where the math is indisputable? Because I do.
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