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Old 08-01-2011, 04:52 PM
 
10,102 posts, read 19,299,358 times
Reputation: 17432

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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Most primary care doctors do not actually run most tests in the office. Pretty much anything more than a basic CBC or urinalysis and perhaps things like rapid strep tests is sent out, with the lab determined by the patient's insurance. Sometimes, if the volume is high enough, the lab will actually provide a phlebotomist. Each lab that is receiving specimens from a given office or clinic will have a courier that goes from office to office and picks the material up.

Encouraging people to go to the ER for things that are not emergencies is not good. No one is going to get rheumatoid arthritis treated appropriately in the ER. That just clogs the system and contributes to long wait times.

All doctors end up providing free care, some more than others, medical schools provide millions in indigent care, and helping folks like the OP is what hospital associated Social Workers do. I know. My son is one.

And, by the way, not everyone who looks Hispanic is illegal.

I'm not "encouraging" her to go to the ER----I suggested it as a last resort---

Getting back to the OP original post---she can't jerk an RX out of her PCP, that's why I suggested the ER as a last resort. I know all about treating RA, having lived with it 30+ years! However, I'm concerned about her thyroid, she needs an Rx NOW she can't keep playing the doc-go-round game.

I suggested a doctor with courier service for basic tests because some patients, like the OP, and my mother, have extreme difficulty getting around. My last doc visit, I was sent to a lab in another building, about a mile away, it meant another visit just due to logistics. But I was able to make it. for my mother, she just about gave up her last few years. she spun in circles going from one place to another, barely able to crawl or hobble, finally found a PCP who had a "blood drawer" on staff, they sent her basic tests to the lab, all she had to do was get to the doctor. But, she had medicare and a supplement, and it still cost her OOP at times.

Lots of times, it isn't a matter of money or insurance, its a matter of logistics, just getting there. Of course, you have to get there somehow, but I do wish doctors would realize how difficult repeated visits are when some things can be handled via phone, etc.


I think there's an attitude there's more out there for the OP than there actually is, have any of you heard of "falling in the cracks?" she keeps telling you she's exhausted all the indigent care she's eligible for, still falls in the cracks where she can't get an RX for thyroid meds. that's why I suggested the ER, perhaps they could at least write an RX for something---
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Old 08-01-2011, 05:55 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,250 posts, read 42,625,789 times
Reputation: 20198
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
Of course the doctor is not going to give a prescription without examining the patient .Most continuing care requires a visit every three months to dispense medicaine under prescription.There are reasons the prescription law requires you be seen and he write the need. Its the law ;basically.
It depends on the medication. Levo isn't a controlled substance. Once your doctor has determined your levels are healthy, you can generally live with new level tests once every 6 months. And if you've been maintaining your levels for several years without needing adjustments, you end up only getting tested once a year, unless you're experiencing symptoms that would prompt the doctor to ask you to get tested again sooner.

You can get 300 days worth of Levo in a single prescription, broken up into 30 or 90 day refills (90 day is usually mail order coverage) as long as the doctor is comfortable giving it to you.
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Old 08-01-2011, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Chanute, KS
302 posts, read 471,122 times
Reputation: 880
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
I called the number in my link above. The rheumatology department at the medical school is taking CICP patients. They are booking appointments for new patients in November, but you must have a referral and they review your records concerning the RA before they will make the appointment.
Last week I requested an appointment with an endocrinologist at UCH. I figure I need to get that taken care of first. I have tried before to get into a primary care physician there, but they are not taking new CICP patients or any Medicaid patients. At UCH, you have to have a referral from one of THEIR physicians, or at least that is what they told me when I spoke with them before. I am trying again anyway. They were supposed to get back with me with an answer within 48 business hours. I have not heard from them.

Perhaps if I become psychotic enough from being hypothyroid, the ER will give me a referral to an endocrinologist. They sent me to a dermatologist when they were unable to come up with a diagnosis as to why my skin was skin was blistering off...
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Old 08-01-2011, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
36,961 posts, read 40,898,119 times
Reputation: 44884
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadKittehs View Post
Last week I requested an appointment with an endocrinologist at UCH. I figure I need to get that taken care of first. I have tried before to get into a primary care physician there, but they are not taking new CICP patients or any Medicaid patients. At UCH, you have to have a referral from one of THEIR physicians, or at least that is what they told me when I spoke with them before. I am trying again anyway. They were supposed to get back with me with an answer within 48 business hours. I have not heard from them.

Perhaps if I become psychotic enough from being hypothyroid, the ER will give me a referral to an endocrinologist. They sent me to a dermatologist when they were unable to come up with a diagnosis as to why my skin was skin was blistering off...

The reason I suggested trying rheumatology is because in the long run, the RA is the more serious condition.

If your hypothyroidism has been well controlled when you were able to get the medication, it is likely that the rheumatologist would be willing to do the TSH and write the script for you. The rheumatologist could also refer you to an endocrinologist, but frankly unless there is something complicated about your thyroid condition you really don't need an endocrinologist. You just need someone to bridge you over until you find a primary care doc that you like.
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Old 08-02-2011, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Chanute, KS
302 posts, read 471,122 times
Reputation: 880
Heard back from UCH today. The good news is they take CICP and don't need a referral, the bad news is that the waiting list for seeing a specialist is one year.

Checked into the internet assistance program kindly given to me by MerryLee. Looks great except for they charge you $250 assessment fee for each condition they will be treating you for, after that, prescriptions, drugs, etc are affordable as is the monthly fee.

I refuse to give up, there has to be something out there so I can get my dang $4 a month prescription...

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Old 08-02-2011, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
36,961 posts, read 40,898,119 times
Reputation: 44884
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadKittehs View Post
Heard back from UCH today. The good news is they take CICP and don't need a referral, the bad news is that the waiting list for seeing a specialist is one year.

Checked into the internet assistance program kindly given to me by MerryLee. Looks great except for they charge you $250 assessment fee for each condition they will be treating you for, after that, prescriptions, drugs, etc are affordable as is the monthly fee.

I refuse to give up, there has to be something out there so I can get my dang $4 a month prescription...

Did you get on the list? Remember, some of the folks on the list will drop out for various reasons. Get in the queue now!

Anything on this list that might be helpful?

NeedyMeds
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