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Old 08-27-2006, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Florida but not for long :) :)
1,130 posts, read 1,260,924 times
Reputation: 50

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I love my little lizards out in the lanai. They are so cute!
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Old 08-27-2006, 03:59 PM
 
18 posts, read 52,317 times
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Good thing they allow killing those iguanas on Boca Grande. They outnumber people 10 to one. They are considered a nusiance.The poison is running off the shelves. About Charley, maybe Bamboosmom came out of it OK, but thousands of people were homeless. I saw mobile homes in a huge pile and debris scattered for miles. People that were prepared still lived in cars. It just did'nt devastate Deep Creek where she lives. So don't believe that crap that if you are prepared. So when your home is gone, those preparations don't mean alot. The police could not even communicate with each other right after Charley. Cell phones were down as was communication at the station. You couldn't call for help. You were on your own. Imagine if you have a house full of kids that are hurt but you can't get any help. But since Bamboosmom always paints an unrealistic picture of things here, I hope no one is stupid enough to use her advice.Hurricanes are a major danger to life and property and have raised home owers insurance to very high levels. If you want to pay those high levels and live in a risk zone, go for it. I don't want to hear that there is danger everywhere. Sure there is, but ask the people in New Orleans if they think it is worse than a tornado.
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Old 08-27-2006, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Central FL
1,683 posts, read 7,716,884 times
Reputation: 839
ByebyeFlorida, I think you have me confused with Bamboosmom. If YOUR home was one of the ones destroyed in a tornado then you would think it just as bad as a hurricane. In a hurricane, people have time, they can evacuate. In a tornado, people die because there is little to no warning. I've seen the damage tornadoes can do. There are more devastating than a hurricane everywhere except possibly right on the coast. How can you possibly compare even 130 mile an hour winds of a hurricane to the 160 - 300 mile an hour winds of a tornado. We had an F4 here in south Orlando a couple of years before Charley. The devastation was awful. Winds of 250+ miles an hour and 40 people dead in seconds!

I'm not trying to make light of hurricanes. I know the awful damage they can do to coastal areas. That's one of the reasons I would never want to live in a coastal community. But I stand by my original premise...there are hazards anywhere you live. YOU get to choose which ones you can live with.

If you don't want to live in Florida you don't have to. It's a free country.
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Old 08-27-2006, 04:45 PM
 
2,156 posts, read 10,365,075 times
Reputation: 760
Pianogal
say what you want about a tornado but I have lived in the Midwest all my life and never had a property damaged by one. Obviously tornadoes don't cause anything near the death and property destruction hurricanes do. With insurance companies continuing to jack up the rates for hurricane coverage down there, coastal Floridians I know are living on pins and needles afraid their coverage may ultimately vanish due to unaffordability. They have as much fear of losing their insurance as they do of hurricanes. Now you find me a Midwesterner who has that kind of a problem with tornadoes.

Last edited by Southside Shrek; 08-27-2006 at 05:01 PM..
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Old 08-27-2006, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Springfield MO for now :(
393 posts, read 1,625,572 times
Reputation: 265
Wink What's up shrek?

What's your interest in the affairs of southwest Florida, and what's up with the negativity and trying to stir up folks? Unless you have property here to worry about, I'm puzzled. We will do what we need to stay as safe as possible, and prepare as best we can for such a storm, but really would prefer some words of encouragement, rather than the attitude conveyed in your post. Yes, we know the realities of storm damage and increased insurance. We got it. Ok........so.........what's really the point of negative posts???
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Old 08-27-2006, 05:08 PM
 
2,156 posts, read 10,365,075 times
Reputation: 760
Sunshine
I was merely responding to the post suggesting that tornadoes were more awful than hurricanes.

as for my interest in S.W. Florida, I do have a property there and I am a frequent visitor. In fact, I plan to be down there again in November unless Ernesto or one of its successors blows away the property.
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Old 08-27-2006, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Central FL
1,683 posts, read 7,716,884 times
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Obviously tornadoes don't cause anything near the death and property destruction hurricanes do.

I just posted a FACT that 40 people died in a tornado in Orlando just a year or so before Charley. 25 Floridians died from Charley and most of them were because they refused to evacuate OR they were out DRIVING in the storm. Obviously a hurricane does more widespread property damage than a tornado.

Here are some that are just as devastating as a hurricane as a line of SUPERCELLS, commonly called KILLER tornados moved across Florida and these people had ZERO warning.

Three supercells dropped killer tornadoes in Florida on February 22-23, striking while people slept. 14 counties are eligible for Federal disaster relief.

Many structures were destroyed in the Altamonte Springs to Sanford area of Florida, much of it at the Sanford airport. Thirteen people were killed. In one residence, a couple, their daughter and her fiance were all killed. The young womans body was found by divers when they searched the creek behind the home. Her 5-year-old daughter survived. One man who was wearing a life-jacket when he fell asleep in an RV(a practice he followed on stormy nights)at Rod's Fish Camp was blown into the raging St. Johns River when when the vehicle was overturned. He suffered several broken ribs and other injuries, but remained afloat in Lake Harney, clinging to an overturned boat, until rescuers found him about a mile from the RV site. Another man was also blown into the river and was reported missing for several days until his body was found. Wreckage from the half dozen or so trailers was washed as far away as 6 miles up the river. Of the 14 deaths, all but occurred in mobile homes or RVs.

Numerous buildings, mobile homes and an RV park were destroyed from Campbell City to Boggy Creek Road in Kissimmee, Florida(Osceola County). Twenty-five people were killed, all but one of which were in mobile homes, modular homes, trailers or campers. Dogs were used to search the pine woods near the Ponderosa Park campground in the hopes of finding survivors still in the underbrush. An sleeping 18-month-old boy was flung, mattress and all, from his great-grandmothers home into the branches of a fallen oak tree in the yard. He was found a half hour after the tornado struck, tucked safely into the mattress, five feet above the ground, covered by sheetrock, boards, and branches which had blown onto it. The child survived with only a few scratches. The house he was in had been destroyed. A 70-year-old Episcopal priest was asleep in a chair when it was hurled 60 yards across the street. His modular home was destroyed and he was fatally injured. Seven other people in that same residential area were killed. About two miles away, every one of the 163 homes in the Flamingo Lakes subdivision was damaged to some degree. About half of these homes, valued at between $100,000 and $200,000 were "destroyed".

The unexpected morning tornado cut a 10-mile-long, half-mide-wide path, killing 12 people and injuring 103 in northeastern Florida. Seven of the deaths occurred in the 45 mobile homes that were destroyed or damaged. Forty-one homes were "100%" destroyed, and 132 houses were damaged. Some of the damaged homes cannot be lived in. All deaths occurred in mobile homes. Two of the deaths in a mobile home occurred when the home was blown into a pond.

I know you can find some of the same types of examples from people who find themselves in the throes of a hurricane. BUT, those people had the choice to evacuate - they did not have to put themselves in harm's way.
Why do people whine that they can't get emergency help during a storm? Our officials BEG people to evacuate, but there's always some who refuse to even go to a local shelter.

You state you have not had any property damage from a tornado...well, I have lived in Florida for 25 years, my mother in law has lived here for 60 years and other than a few shingles neither of us have ever had any damage from a hurricane so that really means nothing. But it means ALOT to the people whose lives have been devastated by either event. People who live on the coast take more chances with hurricanes, but that is their choice. If you love the beach and want to live on it, you have to take the bad along with the good. If you can't handle it...MOVE. Nobody is forced to live on the coast.
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Old 08-27-2006, 05:35 PM
 
11 posts, read 9,382 times
Reputation: 9
This year has been quiet so far. Let's hope that it stays that way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pianogal View Post
Obviously tornadoes don't cause anything near the death and property destruction hurricanes do.

I just posted a FACT that 40 people died in a tornado in Orlando just a year or so before Charley. 25 Floridians died from Charley and most of them were because they refused to evacuate OR they were out DRIVING in the storm. Obviously a hurricane does more widespread property damage than a tornado.

Here are some that are just as devastating as a hurricane as a line of SUPERCELLS, commonly called KILLER tornados moved across Florida and these people had ZERO warning.

Three supercells dropped killer tornadoes in Florida on February 22-23, striking while people slept. 14 counties are eligible for Federal disaster relief.

Many structures were destroyed in the Altamonte Springs to Sanford area of Florida, much of it at the Sanford airport. Thirteen people were killed. In one residence, a couple, their daughter and her fiance were all killed. The young womans body was found by divers when they searched the creek behind the home. Her 5-year-old daughter survived. One man who was wearing a life-jacket when he fell asleep in an RV(a practice he followed on stormy nights)at Rod's Fish Camp was blown into the raging St. Johns River when when the vehicle was overturned. He suffered several broken ribs and other injuries, but remained afloat in Lake Harney, clinging to an overturned boat, until rescuers found him about a mile from the RV site. Another man was also blown into the river and was reported missing for several days until his body was found. Wreckage from the half dozen or so trailers was washed as far away as 6 miles up the river. Of the 14 deaths, all but occurred in mobile homes or RVs.

Numerous buildings, mobile homes and an RV park were destroyed from Campbell City to Boggy Creek Road in Kissimmee, Florida(Osceola County). Twenty-five people were killed, all but one of which were in mobile homes, modular homes, trailers or campers. Dogs were used to search the pine woods near the Ponderosa Park campground in the hopes of finding survivors still in the underbrush. An sleeping 18-month-old boy was flung, mattress and all, from his great-grandmothers home into the branches of a fallen oak tree in the yard. He was found a half hour after the tornado struck, tucked safely into the mattress, five feet above the ground, covered by sheetrock, boards, and branches which had blown onto it. The child survived with only a few scratches. The house he was in had been destroyed. A 70-year-old Episcopal priest was asleep in a chair when it was hurled 60 yards across the street. His modular home was destroyed and he was fatally injured. Seven other people in that same residential area were killed. About two miles away, every one of the 163 homes in the Flamingo Lakes subdivision was damaged to some degree. About half of these homes, valued at between $100,000 and $200,000 were "destroyed".

The unexpected morning tornado cut a 10-mile-long, half-mide-wide path, killing 12 people and injuring 103 in northeastern Florida. Seven of the deaths occurred in the 45 mobile homes that were destroyed or damaged. Forty-one homes were "100%" destroyed, and 132 houses were damaged. Some of the damaged homes cannot be lived in. All deaths occurred in mobile homes. Two of the deaths in a mobile home occurred when the home was blown into a pond.

I know you can find some of the same types of examples from people who find themselves in the throes of a hurricane. BUT, those people had the choice to evacuate - they did not have to put themselves in harm's way.
Why do people whine that they can't get emergency help during a storm? Our officials BEG people to evacuate, but there's always some who refuse to even go to a local shelter.

You state you have not had any property damage from a tornado...well, I have lived in Florida for 25 years, my mother in law has lived here for 60 years and other than a few shingles neither of us have ever had any damage from a hurricane so that really means nothing. But it means ALOT to the people whose lives have been devastated by either event. People who live on the coast take more chances with hurricanes, but that is their choice. If you love the beach and want to live on it, you have to take the bad along with the good. If you can't handle it...MOVE. Nobody is forced to live on the coast.
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Old 08-29-2006, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Miami
566 posts, read 1,913,475 times
Reputation: 162
Well, Jim did come, he's been here since yesterday. It's 11:30 pm Tuesday... & the good news is that so far this tropical storm hasn't even been that. Just a wet day w/gray skies and a bit of mild rain here and there... & hardly any winds. Last week we had regular old afternoon thunderstorms that made more of a roar than this. I'm going out to walk my dog (again, for the second time this evening).
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Old 08-30-2006, 02:01 AM
 
Location: FL
1,318 posts, read 5,480,992 times
Reputation: 927
Thumbs up Thank God!

Yes-I didn't go into work since I'd be driving home at between 1 & 2AM & at the time I was up for work (1PM) they still didn't know how bad the conditions would be. I work at a hotel & they offer everyone to stay, but I wanna be in my own home thank you very much. So it turns out I could've gone although I don't really know how 195 & 95 would've been or the streets near my house that have no street lights and get puddles from hell when it rans! So it was better safe...
And best of all WE HAVE OUR POWER!!!!!! And enough gas for the next few months!
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