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Old 04-01-2012, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,977,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Well, you were specifically talking about Ireland and the UK. Unlike the other places you listed, Ireland is not part of the UK, it is completely separate. Maybe you meant Northern Ireland?
No, I meant Ireland. Last time I was there, there were no immigration nor customs formalities between UK and Ireland, movement between the two was free, nor was there a linguistic impediment, and that had been the case for at least 50 years, so for the purposes of the OPs question, I counted the entirety of the UK and Ireland as one of the three English speaking countries, in his zone of interest, along with Guyana and Australia. No, wait, Trinidad is South America, as surely as the UK is Europe. If I had said four (or 5 or 6 or 7 or 8) instead of three, my case would still have been that the OP's restriction on the scope of the question placed the entire proposition in the realm of absurdity. Nomenclatural geography is not an exact science, and always has gray areas, which is why you cannot tell me how many continents there are..

Feel free to subdivide the entirety of the English-speaking islands to the west of Europe into as many countries as you wish, and be prepared for nitpickers to challenge you. I've made my statement with respect to the OP's interests, which is all I have to say about the topic.
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Old 04-01-2012, 09:25 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
25,947 posts, read 24,745,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
No, I meant Ireland. Last time I was there, there were no immigration nor customs formalities between UK and Ireland, movement between the two was free, nor was there a linguistic impediment, and that had been the case for at least 50 years, so for the purposes of the OPs question, I counted the entirety of the UK and Ireland as one of the three English speaking countries, in his zone of interest, along with Guyana and Australia. No, wait, Trinidad is South America, as surely as the UK is Europe, If I had said four (or 5 or 6 or 7 or 8) instead of three, my case would still have been that the OP's restriction on the scope of the question placed the entire proposition in the realm of absurdity.

Feel free to subdivide the entirety of the English-speaking islands to the west of Europe into as many countries as you wish, and be prepared for nitpickers to challenge you. I've made my statement with respect to the OP's interests, which is all I have to say about the topic.
Well, the thread is about freedom loving countries, Ireland is a completely separate state and country, the Irish are fiercely proud to be separate from the UK. You won't find any immigration or customs formalities between Belgium and France, either, they speak French on both sides of the border, you can move across the border without any checks, still why would anyone consider both to be one French speaking country?!?
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Old 04-01-2012, 09:27 AM
 
25,021 posts, read 27,933,813 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
I am not sure what you mean. Schengen? When you go to Ireland, you are certainly not in the UK and vice versa. Both countries, especially Ireland, would be offended by the way you put it
The ROI (aka Ireland) has a "mini-Schengen" with the UK. It's called the Common Travel Area (CTA for short). When you enter the UK or the ROI, you don't need a passport to travel in each other's countries. You will not pass through immigration on flights originating and ending in the British Isles
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Old 04-01-2012, 09:51 AM
 
1,089 posts, read 1,862,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagobear View Post
Montana
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Last edited by Yac; 04-03-2012 at 06:11 AM..
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Old 04-01-2012, 09:56 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
25,947 posts, read 24,745,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
The ROI (aka Ireland) has a "mini-Schengen" with the UK. It's called the Common Travel Area (CTA for short). When you enter the UK or the ROI, you don't need a passport to travel in each other's countries. You will not pass through immigration on flights originating and ending in the British Isles
Sure, but still, they are two completely separate states and countries, just like all the Schengen member countries.
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Old 04-01-2012, 10:08 AM
 
25,021 posts, read 27,933,813 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Sure, but still, they are two completely separate states and countries, just like all the Schengen member countries.
Yes. But everyone knows that when people say Ireland, they know they are talking about the Republic. People will not call Northern Ireland, Ireland unless you're an IRA type blowhard
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Old 04-01-2012, 10:24 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
25,947 posts, read 24,745,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Yes. But everyone knows that when people say Ireland, they know they are talking about the Republic. People will not call Northern Ireland, Ireland unless you're an IRA type blowhard
Well, I was just referring to jtur88's sentence:
"I counted the entirety of the UK and Ireland as one of the three English speaking countries, in his zone of interest, along with Guyana and Australia."

That just didn't make any sense to me...
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Old 04-01-2012, 10:29 AM
 
25,021 posts, read 27,933,813 times
Reputation: 11790
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Well, I was just referring to jtur88's sentence:
"I counted the entirety of the UK and Ireland as one of the three English speaking countries, in his zone of interest, along with Guyana and Australia."

That just didn't make any sense to me...
It made sense to me. I think the subtleties of the English language got lost on you. No worries, it happens to me sometimes as well. But jtur88 meant the ROI and the UK (including NI) don't have passport controls in place between them. NI is already part of the UK
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Old 04-01-2012, 10:46 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
25,947 posts, read 24,745,361 times
Reputation: 9728
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
It made sense to me. I think the subtleties of the English language got lost on you. No worries, it happens to me sometimes as well. But jtur88 meant the ROI and the UK (including NI) don't have passport controls in place between them. NI is already part of the UK
Sorry, that's not a linguistic subtlety, but mere sloppiness 'Country' is clearly defined. They are in no way one country and never will be again. I am not even Irish, any real Irishman would be offended or at best attribute such a statement to mere ignorance. The Irish are a different country in every way BECAUSE they are such a freedom loving country
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Old 04-01-2012, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,977,099 times
Reputation: 36644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Sure, but still, they are two completely separate states and countries, just like all the Schengen member countries.
However. the Schengen countries all speak different and mutually unintelligible languages (except Germany/Austria), which lends them an air of distinctness. And UK/Ireland were historically the same country until a century ago. And the absence of border formalities has existed throughout their history, and not just an economic contrivance that was added in recent years.
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