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Old 05-24-2014, 06:59 PM
 
24,843 posts, read 31,265,068 times
Reputation: 11427

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrWillys View Post
Doctor who performed abortions shot to death - CNN.com

Did he kill anyone like anti abortion protesters do?
I do not care.

If I had my way most babies would be aborted.

Only people that can afford them should have them......of course.....it is not up to me.
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Old 05-24-2014, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,874 posts, read 12,928,374 times
Reputation: 28957
It's very common for other unions to join in support of a strike, especially for a company whose employees are new to the world of standing up for their rights as workers. I'm not a union member at present but I have been. I owe much to unions given that my parents educated me on decent salaries they were able to earn thanks to the United Steelworkers.

I wish the fast food workers of America good luck in their quest to earn a decent wage. I do what I can to support an improvement in the minimum wage. It can only make our economy stronger. I will never understand a person who doesn't think Americans working 40 hours a week deserve healthy food, decent shelter, clothing, transportation, and good education for their children. That cannot be bought, even for one person, on the usual fast food worker's salary.
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Old 05-25-2014, 04:47 AM
 
33,050 posts, read 12,521,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
It's very common for other unions to join in support of a strike, especially for a company whose employees are new to the world of standing up for their rights as workers. I'm not a union member at present but I have been. I owe much to unions given that my parents educated me on decent salaries they were able to earn thanks to the United Steelworkers.

I wish the fast food workers of America good luck in their quest to earn a decent wage. I do what I can to support an improvement in the minimum wage. It can only make our economy stronger. I will never understand a person who doesn't think Americans working 40 hours a week deserve healthy food, decent shelter, clothing, transportation, and good education for their children. That cannot be bought, even for one person, on the usual fast food worker's salary.
Many of us not in unions owe a lot to those who were. People risked their lives to organize for decent wages and working conditions. The rest of us are riding on their coat tails.

Standing beside those who are organizing now for decent wages and working conditions is an honorable endeavor.

A strong economy is based on money in circulation. Money stashed away in Cayman Island and Swiss bank accounts does nothing for our economy. Paying fast food, retail, child care, farm... workers a decent salary puts that money into circulation. Even if those who believe these workers should be paid in peanuts might want to consider the economic effect of paying them a decent salary. We'd all be better off if they were.

In New Zealand, fast food workers organized to secure dependable work hours. They earn $12.35/hour and Big Macs cost a nickel less than in the U.S. Here's the link:

Working At McDonald's Is Starkly Different In These 3 Countries
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Old 05-25-2014, 05:02 AM
 
33,050 posts, read 12,521,075 times
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In Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America, Barbara Ehrenreich describes her experiences fifteen years ago working as a waitress, hotel maid, cleaning lady, nursing home aide, and Walmart sales clerk.

She discovered "no job is truly "unskilled," that even the lowliest occupations require exhausting mental and muscular effort. She also learned that one job is not enough; you need at least two if you want to live indoors."

Millions of Americans work full time, year round, for poverty-level wages. They work when they're sick because they have no sick leave and can't afford to miss a day.

I could go on, but read the book for yourself. Only those with a heart of stone will finish it and still believe that these hardworking people don't deserve to earn a living wage.
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Old 05-25-2014, 05:58 AM
 
24,843 posts, read 31,265,068 times
Reputation: 11427
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
In Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America, Barbara Ehrenreich describes her experiences fifteen years ago working as a waitress, hotel maid, cleaning lady, nursing home aide, and Walmart sales clerk.

She discovered "no job is truly "unskilled," that even the lowliest occupations require exhausting mental and muscular effort. She also learned that one job is not enough; you need at least two if you want to live indoors."

Millions of Americans work full time, year round, for poverty-level wages. They work when they're sick because they have no sick leave and can't afford to miss a day.

I could go on, but read the book for yourself. Only those with a heart of stone will finish it and still believe that these hardworking people don't deserve to earn a living wage.
I worked three jobs together....at times very sick.....all minimum wage.

It taught me I did not like being poor.
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Old 05-25-2014, 06:06 AM
 
8,112 posts, read 4,457,906 times
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i went yesterday to get an oil change at walmart. it took four people hour and half to do a twenty minute job at most. oh they claimed they had to check this and that. I did not want this and that but just oil. They was just freaking slow

so i feel they are worth their minimum wages and not much more. I doulbt i will ever take it back to wally world. my time is worth more than they wasted. I gladly pay a company extra to get me out quicker
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Old 05-25-2014, 07:01 AM
 
33,050 posts, read 12,521,075 times
Reputation: 20942
Quote:
Originally Posted by Driller1 View Post
I worked three jobs together....at times very sick.....all minimum wage.

It taught me I did not like being poor.
Who does, really?

I'm always amazed by people who believe that those who are poor are that way because they are lazy, unmotivated.

Some of the hardest working people I know are working at minimum wage jobs. But how do you get a college degree if letters swim around in front of your eyes, if your brain doesn't work right?

What about those who've spent twelve years in public schools and still can't read or add? Recent study came out that something like a fourth of high school seniors can't read. How do you learn from books if you can't read?

Many poor people have cognitive and other limitations that make moving up the ladder of life an overwhelming challenge.

Taking care of kids, cleaning buildings, stocking shelves, cashiering, preparing food... this is all honorable work. Why we think these workers are subpar is beyond me.
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Old 05-25-2014, 07:08 AM
 
33,050 posts, read 12,521,075 times
Reputation: 20942
Quote:
Originally Posted by brownbagg View Post
i went yesterday to get an oil change at walmart. it took four people hour and half to do a twenty minute job at most. oh they claimed they had to check this and that. I did not want this and that but just oil. They was just freaking slow

so i feel they are worth their minimum wages and not much more. I doulbt i will ever take it back to wally world. my time is worth more than they wasted. I gladly pay a company extra to get me out quicker
Not only did you help cover the cost of their low wages, but your taxes also covered their share of taxes for defense, schools, police and fire protection as they don't make enough to pay taxes. On top of that, your taxes likely help fund the food stamps, subsidized housing, and medical care needed to subsidize their meager existence.

So that oil change cost a bundle.

We go to a neighborhood place that also does a dandy job on car repairs. It's a better bargain in my book.
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Old 05-25-2014, 07:10 AM
 
24,843 posts, read 31,265,068 times
Reputation: 11427
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
Who does, really?

I'm always amazed by people who believe that those who are poor are that way because they are lazy, unmotivated.

Some of the hardest working people I know are working at minimum wage jobs. But how do you get a college degree if letters swim around in front of your eyes, if your brain doesn't work right?

What about those who've spent twelve years in public schools and still can't read or add? Recent study came out that something like a fourth of high school seniors can't read. How do you learn from books if you can't read?

Many poor people have cognitive and other limitations that make moving up the ladder of life an overwhelming challenge.

Taking care of kids, cleaning buildings, stocking shelves, cashiering, preparing food... this is all honorable work. Why we think these workers are subpar is beyond me.
I did not go to collage....I was lucky to graduate HS.
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Old 05-25-2014, 08:27 AM
 
33,050 posts, read 12,521,075 times
Reputation: 20942
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
Who does, really?

I'm always amazed by people who believe that those who are poor are that way because they are lazy, unmotivated.

Some of the hardest working people I know are working at minimum wage jobs. But how do you get a college degree if letters swim around in front of your eyes, if your brain doesn't work right?

What about those who've spent twelve years in public schools and still can't read or add? Recent study came out that something like a fourth of high school seniors can't read. How do you learn from books if you can't read?

Many poor people have cognitive and other limitations that make moving up the ladder of life an overwhelming challenge.

Taking care of kids, cleaning buildings, stocking shelves, cashiering, preparing food... this is all honorable work. Why we think these workers are subpar is beyond me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Driller1 View Post
I did not go to collage....I was lucky to graduate HS.
Clearly, you can read and write. Many people can't. It's a huge barrier to moving up in the world.

Cognitive disabilities and mental health issues present barriers to successful. Read the other day that 40% of homeless people are veterans and wondered how many of them struggle with PTSD. Many folks in jail have a mental health diagnosis.

The deck is stacked against some people.

I suspect that you drew a number of high cards or at least figured out how to play the cards you were dealt. Not all are so fortunate.

Our nation is not lacking the necessary resource for everyone to have enough to eat and a decent place to live. When people stand beside McDonalds' employees who are asking for a fair living wage, we are standing up for an American tradition of treating people fairly. Fair and just treatment of one is what our nation was founded on.

I, for one, am proud of the 84% that were standing shoulder to shoulder with McDonalds' employees .
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