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Old 03-16-2015, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,056 posts, read 3,043,677 times
Reputation: 8527

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Why would homeschooling parents bother doing the work they assigned to their children? Were they then correcting it and assigning themselves grades for their own benefit? That makes no sense at all...

We live in what's considered a good school district, but I don't know what the districts are "graded" on... if it's how many kids pass the standardized tests, though, then that's probably not the school for my family. I don't care for the constant prep-test-prep-test-prep-test cycle that seems to be going on lately.
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Old 03-16-2015, 04:46 PM
 
3,072 posts, read 4,047,697 times
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The problem (from the teacher perspective) is that when homeschooling is done poorly, it can be disastrous. That being said, I have several HSing associates who are trained public teachers (or intelligent and motivated non-teachers), and the results are great. The problem isn't HS, it is that some children need more help than their parents can offer.
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Old 03-16-2015, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Texas
596 posts, read 473,124 times
Reputation: 1806
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Reading comprehension is your friend.

But defensiveness blinds us.

Note that I didn't even say that we were choosing to homeschool. Nor did I say that a good school isn't a better choice than a parent who is either unwilling or unfit to home school. We must be neighbors, as the school district we live in is not only tops in the area but one of the tops in the state.
That being said, I still have to ask myself if my son and daughter will do better in that environment or if they will do better in a homeschool environment or a private school environment. The reason this is even a debate in my mind is that I went to these schools. I credit these schools for my success in college; however, I also blame the way the schools are set up in this country for my eventual hatred of the school system, my feelings that most of the day are a waste of time rehashing the same things over and over again, & I don't want my kids to wind up hating school like I did.

The simple fact is that in the 6 hours kids spend in school, they learn about 45 minutes worth of stuff.

I started my education in a private international school in another country. The school days were short. The curriculum was fun and engaging. I really love going to school. There was no homework. And when I moved here, I was at least one grade ahead of everyone else I was in class with. Our education system wastes a lot of time and kills the spirit of fun in learning. I went to school in California. I went to schools in Texas. While the schools in Texas were slightly better, they were nothing like the private school I went to.

And outsourcing your car or your dirty dishes is slightly different than outsourcing your children. If you don't see the difference, I can't really help you.
Honestly, I am not being defensive about it at all. And I apologize that I came off that way.

I am not against homeschool at all. I have taught secondary math for 10 years in both public and private schools and have taught children who were homeschooled. I have absolutely nothing negative to say about those kids. They were wonderful. Before we finally moved to the area that we lived in, I did consider homeschooling. Once I saw that my eldest loved school and the school he was attending was doing a good job, I didn't give homeschooling another thought.

I never implied you were set to homeschool. The op's questions was asking why more people don't. It seems like a lot of posters have been stating every other reason besides the obvious one - that those who have thought about hs and have chosen not to generally like public school. That was my only point.

What I don't understand is why a lot of hs think we are selling out kids if we choose not to homeschool. And I don't outsource my children. I outsource their formal education to professionals. Also, I stated many examples not just a mechanic that are just as important as education like healthcare, nutrition, etc.

Last edited by Jayerdu; 03-16-2015 at 05:41 PM..
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Old 03-16-2015, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 5,163,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aliss2 View Post
The problem (from the teacher perspective) is that when homeschooling is done poorly, it can be disastrous.
Obviously this is true for any method, as I'm sure most of us have seen.
Quote:
That being said, I have several HSing associates who are trained public teachers (or intelligent and motivated non-teachers), and the results are great. The problem isn't HS, it is that some children need more help than their parents can offer.
Generally speaking, those kids will be the ones who don't do well in public school, either.
Homeschooling is probably their best option...

So far as homeschooling failures, yep, they're out there. I can think of several...
And while the failure rate amongst homeschoolers is still well below the failure rate for public school, I'm not going to judge public schooling as a whole based on the kids who have done poorly.




See what I mean?
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Old 03-16-2015, 06:48 PM
 
5,724 posts, read 3,015,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
Nah, it's not really that complicated.
Up until about 7th or 8th grades, most adults DO have the knowledge and ability to teach kids, just straight out of their heads...though texts make it easier.
Speaking as a certified K-8 teacher with nearly 20 years of experience, I didn't learn anything in college that really taught me subject matter. What I learned was methodology and classroom management, neither of which are particulalrly relevant in a one-on-one with your own kids.
(High school is a different category, but again, that's why a lot of homeschooling parents farm out subjects they're not totally confident with.)

The Little League/soccer coach is actually an excellent example.
Are those people trained as coaches? Were they superstars in the sport? Are they experts of some sort?
Or...do they merely know the rudiments of the game, happen to like kids and want to see them succeed?

Seriously, that's really all it takes--a devotion to your kids and their success.

Maybe those adults you know have the knowledge, but that's far from most adults. In fact, following the example, most of those coaching are NOT trained as coaches, they were NOT superstars (except in high school), they are NOT experts. And as far the rudiments of the game, they know just enough to be dangerous. They don't know the actual rules of the game, regardless of the fact they played as a kid. They don't know how to actually coach the skills. They see a kid who happens to be a bit stronger/faster than the others and assume that kid's the star. Then a few years later that "star" kid comes up against kids who had actual skilled coaches and bam! They never progressed beyond what they thought they knew. Then they pass that ignorance along to the next generation.

None of this is against homeschooling. I've known plenty of parents who did. But I'm very much against the idea that anyone can just teach their kids. How can a parent who's illiterate teach a child to read? How can a parent who can't make change teach math?
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Old 03-16-2015, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 5,163,461 times
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By using a text that does. ...Online resources, classes or even entire school programs.
By being willing to educate themselves as well as their children.

That's part of devotion to one's kids' success, afterall.
This is the 21st century. Anyone who is willing to put forth the effort will be capable.

Last edited by itsMeFred; 03-16-2015 at 08:51 PM..
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Old 03-17-2015, 02:37 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
20,744 posts, read 37,369,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
,,,, most of those coaching are NOT trained as coaches, ... They never progressed beyond what they thought they knew. Then they pass that ignorance along to the next generation.

None of this is against homeschooling. I've known plenty of parents who did. But I'm very much against the idea that anyone can just teach their kids. How can a parent who's illiterate teach a child to read? How can a parent who can't make change teach math?
You are giving WAY too much credit to the 'parents'... (and Homeschooling is NOTHING like sports... actually an antonym. i.e.... not about the competition / superstar.)

Instill to your children CHARACTER skills / qualities / public service and a desire to learn and capability / freedom to explore how to learn, and the parent's teaching job is minimal. My Homeschooled kids (10 yrs beyond college) are much more resourceful / capable than their illiterate parents (who were public schooled) Their neighbors / elder friends / peer mentors / experiences had many times more influential impact than their lowly / incapable parents! (thank goodness). Can't imagine them have wasted the thousands of hours sitting in a classroom of misbehaving / dis-interested students and a teacher (?) who was public schooled K 1-20 and has SQUAT for savvy / skills / personality / personal vested interest in your kids. (Teachers vary, just like students / administrators / bosses / co-workers). I had one good teacher in 20 yrs edu. and about 70% of teachers were 70%ers. 29% were less than that, MUCH less.

Certainly different for all, but as mentioned... just go hire some public school kids and some homeschool kids and put your company's capital / cash / reputation / liability / future & customers in the hands of a 17 - 18 yr old and see how you come out.!

As usual,,, the proof is in the pudding.
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Old 03-17-2015, 10:34 PM
 
8,201 posts, read 7,140,010 times
Reputation: 7731
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
Nah, it's not really that complicated.
Up until about 7th or 8th grades, most adults DO have the knowledge and ability to teach kids, just straight out of their heads...though texts make it easier.
Speaking as a certified K-8 teacher with nearly 20 years of experience, I didn't learn anything in college that really taught me subject matter. What I learned was methodology and classroom management, neither of which are particulalrly relevant in a one-on-one with your own kids.
(High school is a different category, but again, that's why a lot of homeschooling parents farm out subjects they're not totally confident with.)

The Little League/soccer coach is actually an excellent example.
Are those people trained as coaches? Were they superstars in the sport? Are they experts of some sort?
Or...do they merely know the rudiments of the game, happen to like kids and want to see them succeed?

Seriously, that's really all it takes--a devotion to your kids and their success.
Where did you go to college and what did you major in?

I'd ask for my money back if that's all you got out of your undergrad education!

Last edited by Informed Info; 03-17-2015 at 10:45 PM..
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Old 03-17-2015, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
10,236 posts, read 13,502,646 times
Reputation: 25856
To those of you who have had success in homeschooling your children.. and to those of you who were homeschooled and liked it.. God bless you all. Seriously!

Had my own mother attempted to homeschool me I would have viciously fought it kicking and screaming and made all of us miserable. School was the only sociable access I had to peers and playmates because I wasn't allowed to have them at the house or go to theirs. I'm assuming - hoping - that most successful homeschooling families allow for intermingling with other children somehow.
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Old 03-17-2015, 11:54 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,520 posts, read 21,695,724 times
Reputation: 44139
I instill values at home and through my church. And my children attend school and meet others with values and opinions that are different from ours.

That does not frighten us. In the real world not everyone will agree with you. Deal with it.

One of the things that children and young adults need to negotiate is dealing with people - including teachers who's ideas and thoughts differ from theirs.

I home schooled my daughter for one term when we moved in the middle of the year. It was fun at times, but it also tested our relationship.

I firmly believe in school that is outside of the home. And a good public school is best. Although a private school may be needed at times.

This year at my daughter's diverse public school she has made three movies, video taped games for ESPN Cleveland, volunteered as a big sister to an under privileged child, and taken AP classes. Three of them. She also was able to enroll in a class at Kent State University.

She is on the swimming and diving team. And she is a cheerleader.

My daughter is doing normal high school things. We bought her prom dress yesterday. I think that's cool and normal. She is also on prom committee.

There is no way that I could provide these experiences at home. I have a masters degree. And I have taught HS and college classes.

I feel sorry for kids who are home schooled.

We can't keep our children in a world created by us. Well... we can. But I think it's a bad choice.
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